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Discussion Starter #1
I recently bought a NIB PX4 in 45 ACP and it may be because I'm used to the smooth recoil of my Springer 1911 but the recoil spring on that PX4 is tough!! It takes quite a bit of force to rack the slide.

If I keep the action open for a couple of days, will it soften the recoil spring? I know one way of softening it would be to put some rounds through it but it's not as fun as my 1911 and why shoot tupperware when you have steel?!?
 

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If you mean "weaken" by leaving the slide locked back. NO, If it did, that would change a lot of how the pistol performs with a given load. If it is not used for protection, you could try an extra amount of lube to break-in the moving parts.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Does the pistol in question have an exposed hammer that can be precocked, removing the hammer mainspring from the equation?
Yes. Any be cocking the hammer the sliding of the rack is relatively easier but still a bit on the strong side.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
If you mean "weaken" by leaving the slide locked back. NO, If it did, that would change a lot of how the pistol performs with a given load. If it is not used for protection, you could try an extra amount of lube to break-in the moving parts.
I've lubed it quite a bit but it's just due to a very stiff spring. I guess with time the slide will get smoother but I figured locking the slide would speed up this process a bit. It's similar to loading a brand new magazine to full capacity for about a week to soften up the spring.
 

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I've lubed it quite a bit but it's just due to a very stiff spring. I guess with time the slide will get smoother but I figured locking the slide would speed up this process a bit. It's similar to loading a brand new magazine to full capacity for about a week to soften up the spring.

I know this will probably sound like a ridiculously-radical idea, but what about just changing the recoil spring out to one a couple of pounds lighter? ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I know this will probably sound like a ridiculously-radical idea, but what about just changing the recoil spring out to one a couple of pounds lighter? ;)
I don't spend any money on the PX4. It's like an unwanted child and will remain stock. I just got it after I sold my 92FS and the only reason was so I could have both pistols in 45 ACP caliber. It's a decent pistol but nothing about it wows me and it's definitely going to get less range time than my 1911.

All of my money goes into my 1911:biglaugh: Why waste it on a PX4?
 

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crazy idea

Would it make more sense to trade for a back-up redundancy piece to your 1911?
You know, like another 1911?

I mean, since you already don't like the PX4, and admit you won't spend much time shooting it?
 

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Recoil spring

The recoil spring for any gun should match the load used. In a 1911 platform, there can be a wide variable of recoil spring tension, depending on the caliber, the load used, and the mainspring tension.

For most stock guns, the gun should be set up so it ejects the brass from 3 to 6 feet from the shooter.

I have used 16# recoil springs for lighter .45 loads, and 18#-20# springs for heavier .45 hardball loads. It all depends on the load and the gun. I also like to use a 19# mainspring for light .45 loads, and a 23# mainspring for heavy hardball loads.

If your new PX4 functions properly with the current spring, and ejects the brass from 3 - 6 feet, I would leave it as is. If however, the brass is just barely clearing the slide, then you may need to reduce the spring tensions for the load you are shooting. When the springs are too heavy on a light load, the slide may not cycle all the way back, and will short stroke. This may not allow the brass to hit the ejector, which may lead to gun jams, and may not even strip a round from the magazine, leading to FTF.
 

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.

All of my money goes into my 1911:biglaugh: Why waste it on a PX4?
Reminds me of my first ex-wife...always giving me questions/problems for which there were no answers. ;)

If you can't afford a new recoil spring, then maybe you can't afford to shoot. :)
 

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Springs loaded to normal deflection aren't weakened

It's similar to loading a brand new magazine to full capacity for about a week to soften up the spring.
The number of cycles is what causes spring wear, not normal compression. GI magazines stored loaded since 1945 have functioned fine.

So, whether you're working on your recoil spring or magazine springs, they aren't going to get "softer" with compression and time.

As posted by another, if you cycle the action a few thousand times, you may see some spring wear. However, the action may not function reliably at that point...
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Would it make more sense to trade for a back-up redundancy piece to your 1911?
You know, like another 1911?

I mean, since you already don't like the PX4, and admit you won't spend much time shooting it?
I have considered it but I like a variety. I know people that own several pistols of the exact model and I wonder why they do that. For me, one pistol per model is more than enough. My 1911 is my carry weapon and my main gun but the PX4 is something different for those days that I want a little different flavor.

I'll probably buy another 1911 down the road (perhaps a commander size) but I think I'll keep the PX4 since it's a pretty good gun stock and I've always been a fan of Berettas.

It's not that it's a bad gun, it's just that the 1911 feels better in my hands so I tend to favor it and spend time with it at the range more.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Reminds me of my first ex-wife...always giving me questions/problems for which there were no answers. ;)

If you can't afford a new recoil spring, then maybe you can't afford to shoot. :)
1. Did you just call me a woman? :biglaugh:
2. I can definitely afford a freakin' recoil spring. It's just the fact that I choose not to invest in one for the PX4. As I mentioned earlier, a lot of my money goes into my 1911 and the PX4 will remain stock and seems to be just fine as it came out of the box.

Think of it like a 1911 being a Nissan GT-R and the PX4 being like a Toyota Camry. Which one would you spend money on for custom parts and/or enhancements if you had both vehicles in your garage?
 

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I mean, since you called it a "weapon"

1......
Toyota Camry. ....
in your garage?

I would off myself if I had a Toyota Camry in MY garage.

As for 'two of a kind', there is an old saying about how "one is none, two is one".
If you need it defined, you won't understand.
If not, you'll trade for another 1911......you can add toys later.....
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I would off myself if I had a Toyota Camry in MY garage.

As for 'two of a kind', there is an old saying about how "one is none, two is one".
If you need it defined, you won't understand.
If not, you'll trade for another 1911......you can add toys later.....
I go by "one is one, two is two"...

However, the Springfield Loaded Champion is looking very favorable right now. Maybe that's what I'll get myself this Christmas.
 

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I would off myself if I had a Toyota Camry in MY garage.

As for 'two of a kind', there is an old saying about how "one is none, two is one".
If you need it defined, you won't understand.
If not, you'll trade for another 1911......you can add toys later.....

Very True,

doesn't make much sense to keep a gun you don't like. If its not enjoyable and your not going to use it much, why have it taking up space for a gun that you will hardly use. Trade that sucker in and get something you will shoot. Like your Commander size.
 
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