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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I posted this in the Colt forum, so if you're not a member over there, or missed it, here it is again.

Backstory:

My father-in-law was an avid gun guy/hunter. He especially loved Browning over and under shotguns, as do I, and we went clay shooting and upland game hunting several times together. Unfortunately he passed away about 4 years ago and my mother-in-law just recently decided to liquidate the leftovers of his collection - I say leftovers because many high end guns were bequeathed to his immediate family members. There were two pistols in particular that I wanted, one was a S&W model 629-1, and the other was a Colt prewar Super Match. I did get the "family discount", mostly because I was the one that sold his collection, and I also purchased several rifles and shotguns as well. I wish I could go back in time and pick his brain about the Colt, we never spoke in depth about it. This Colt represents 1 of approximately 4,000 Match/Super Match Super 38s ever made. I believe this gun came to him from his father, who worked for Browning, but I don't know that for certain. When I took ownership, I realized a couple of items were not correct. The magazine, which was a post-WWII replacement, and the trigger, which was a WWI era, 1911 style long trigger. I could tell that quite a few rounds had been put through it, due to the wear on the barrel and a seemingly weak recoil spring...and the whole pistol was unfortunately filthy dirty. I completely detail stripped it and she immediately shined up like a new penny. At this point I decided it was time to look for a correct mag and trigger - quite the daunting task I learned. Long story short, a mutual friend was able to help me locate a correct magazine for a reasonable price. I had also purchased a correct short, milled trigger, but it was parkerized, and I wasn't sure that I'd be able to correctly blue it. Over a period of about 2 days, I personally sanded off the parkerizing and took it to my gunsmith, who I had literally been pestering for weeks about getting a correct color of blue. He worked his magic and presented 3 samples to me, one of which was a near perfect match, and I gave him the green light. He correctly polished the bow, just like they did to the Super Match/National Match pistols back in the day. It turned out perfectly and I finally got it installed. Yes, she is not 100% original, but she is 100% correct now, and that makes me happy. I may shoot a few mags through it at some point in the future, just to try out the new trigger, but this gun is now a collector piece. I hope you guys enjoy!

Casey
 

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I posted this in the Colt forum, so if you're not a member over there, or missed it, here it is again.

Backstory:

My father-in-law was an avid gun guy/hunter. He especially loved Browning over and under shotguns, as do I, and we went clay shooting and upland game hunting several times together. Unfortunately he passed away about 4 years ago and my mother-in-law just recently decided to liquidate the leftovers of his collection - I say leftovers because many high end guns were bequeathed to his immediate family members. There were two pistols in particular that I wanted, one was a S&W model 629-1, and the other was a Colt prewar Super Match. I did get the "family discount", mostly because I was the one that sold his collection, and I also purchased several rifles and shotguns as well. I wish I could go back in time and pick his brain about the Colt, we never spoke in depth about it. This Colt represents 1 of approximately 4,000 Match/Super Match Super 38s ever made. I believe this gun came to him from his father, who worked for Browning, but I don't know that for certain. When I took ownership, I realized a couple of items were not correct. The magazine, which was a post-WWII replacement, and the trigger, which was a WWI era, 1911 style long trigger. I could tell that quite a few rounds had been put through it, due to the wear on the barrel and a seemingly weak recoil spring...and the whole pistol was unfortunately filthy dirty. I completely detail stripped it and she immediately shined up like a new penny. At this point I decided it was time to look for a correct mag and trigger - quite the daunting task I learned. Long story short, a mutual friend was able to help me locate a correct magazine for a reasonable price. I had also purchased a correct short, milled trigger, but it was parkerized, and I wasn't sure that I'd be able to correctly blue it. Over a period of about 2 days, I personally sanded off the parkerizing and took it to my gunsmith, who I had literally been pestering for weeks about getting a correct color of blue. He worked his magic and presented 3 samples to me, one of which was a near perfect match, and I gave him the green light. He correctly polished the bow, just like they did to the Super Match/National Match pistols back in the day. It turned out perfectly and I finally got it installed. Yes, she is not 100% original, but she is 100% correct now, and that makes me happy. I may shoot a few mags through it at some point in the future, just to try out the new trigger, but this gun is now a collector piece. I hope you guys enjoy!

Casey
I am an old guy absolutely qu**r for Supers, well aware of and lustful for a Super Match. That could be the neatest thing I have ever seen. You may know this but in one of Raymond Chandler's Phillip Marlowe mysteries, Farewell My Lovely, Marlowe carried "a Colt .38 automatic of the type known as the Super Match." I think that's actually a quote. I only have left one full size Super of much later vintage and a couple of Commanders. As luck should have it I was only just fondling the GM this morning.

What a beauty. Good for you and thanks for the pictures.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
You may know this but in one of Raymond Chandler's Phillip Marlowe mysteries, Farewell My Lovely, Marlowe carried "a Colt .38 automatic of the type known as the Super Match."
Actually, I did not. Was this quote from the film, the novel, or both?

Thank you for the kind works about the pistol! It is literally my prized possession :love:
 

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Actually, I did not. Was this quote from the film, the novel, or both?

Thank you for the kind works about the pistol! It is literally my prized possession :love:
That's a quote from the novel. I read it literally 50 years ago -- I discovered him while staying at a friend's house and although I'd seen a couple of the earlier film adaptations I'd never sure enough read one of his books. I have since read them all -- although it's been a while. I'm not likely to forget the line about "the type known as the Super Match." I had an oldie Government Model, possibly pre-war but let it get away from me.

I assure you, if I owned such a beauty it would be my most prized possession also.

Again, good wishes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Beautiful guns. Curious why the frame only has a serial number on it and no other markings? Don’t they usually say Colt on them right before serial number?
Thank you!
There are a few other small stamps on the frame that are difficult to see from the pictures. I can’t speak of ALL Colts, but pistols from this era typically have the name Colt roll marked into the slide only.
 

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Beautiful guns. Curious why the frame only has a serial number on it and no other markings? Don’t they usually say Colt on them right before serial number?
There are a few other small stamps on the frame that are difficult to see from the pictures. I can’t speak of ALL Colts, but pistols from this era typically have the name Colt roll marked into the slide only.
Correct, since the manufacturer (Colt) and place (Hartford) were prominently marked on the slide. My 1920 commercial .45 is stamped Government Model, and the serial number has a "C" to indicate a civilian or Commercial pistol (as opposed to a military or government contract weapon).

On the trigger guard on the left side you can see a "P" and the triangular "VP" for "Verified Proofed" stamp.
 
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