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Discussion Starter #1
So I was able to take my Sp101 apart for the second time to smooth things out a bit. The first time I just used metal polish and oil. This time I used 1500 grit sandpaper to smooth the contact points of each part. I didn't change springs or use shims, but I am surprised how much smoother it made the action. However, I'm not sure if the made sandpaper difference or the fact that I removed the gunky powder residue from the cylinder pin. Although it is not much lighter of a pull now, it feels more pleasant than I had expected.
 

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On every Ruger I have slicked up over the years just removing all of the burrs left in the gun by the factory makes a huge difference in DA pull - even with the stock springs. Especially in the small holes where springs ride -they're usually pretty rough and nasty inside and the stamped mainspring guide rod has very rough square corners left on it which need to be radiused and dressed down smooth so the inside of the mainsprings doesn;t drag on it. You'll need something coarser than 1500 grit paper to clean these surfaces up. I use stones ranging from 320 grit to 600 grit on most surfaces. 1500 grit pretty much just smooths the tops of the high spots. Ruger designs and manufacturers some very fine handguns but they don't spend very much time de burring them when they come off of the mill. If you are new to DA revolver shooting one thing that happens to most people is your hand quickly develops new muscles and will make the pull "seem" lighter to your brain.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I haven't smoothed the main spring guid rod like you mentioned. I finger powered a "like" sized drill bit to clean out the trigger return spring tunnel. I guess the best way to describe the difference, it use to feel like cutting a potato now it feels like cutting a stick of cold butter. I usually shoot 50 rounds of reloaded .38 sp. When I'm on my last last 5-10 shots I can feel the fatigue in my trigger finger, I have strong hands from replacing autoglass. The gun and I seems to like 38+p the best. It's a hard gun to learn to shoot straight at 15 yards, but I think it's a good skill to have.
 

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Agreed - DA revolver shooting takes considerable skill but it is a valuable skill and can be learned with practice. Many people try it and give up.:rolleyes:
 

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I dry fired my SP-101 about a thousand times, cleaned the innards, lubed with a high-quality lube, and kept dry firing almost daily. It now has an amazingly smooth trigger -- far better than my j-frame.
 

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I don't know about it ever getting better than a J frame but the final finishing on the innards of the SP-101 is poor. It's really a shame because it's such a nice little revolver with a lot of potential. I think demand has hurt the quality control.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
One thing I noticed about the SP101 is the barrel is slightly off center to right.
 

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I had a sp 101 I traded off..I completely disassembled polished every spot that could create friction. Even in the pin holes. I put a Q-tip lathered with filtz and chucked it up in a drill. I installed shims on the trigger, hammer, and hammer dog. I also installed wolf reduced power springs.
It was a fun little project to do on a rainy day and very rewarding..
I believe ruger triggers smooth out better the Smith and Wesson triggers. Who ever ended up with that gun was going to get spoiled.. It was such a smooth , light trigger pull..
 

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Rugers with roughly finished interiors are nothing new - they have always been like that. They are built to a price point. But the designs are good and they pretty much work as advertised out of the box and they are affordable. If you want a Ruger that is slick you'll have to do it yourself or pay someone else.
 

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I dry fired my SP-101 about a thousand times, cleaned the innards, lubed with a high-quality lube, and kept dry firing almost daily. It now has an amazingly smooth trigger -- far better than my j-frame.
This is all I did to my wife's SP-101.
Then she ran 500 rounds through it.
Smooth as a baby's but now ...

An din't didn't take her very long to start making 3 or 4 inch groups at 10 yards!
 

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One thing I noticed about the SP101 is the barrel is slightly off center to right.
Let me guess?
Somebody had sent back to the factory to be re-registered?

My wife's initially shot 6" left.
I sent the target with the pistol.

It came back with the barrel twisted slightly left.
But it shot dead center on the target.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Let me guess?
Somebody had sent back to the factory to be re-registered?

My wife's initially shot 6" left.
I sent the target with the pistol.

It came back with the barrel twisted slightly left.
But it shot dead center on the target.
I didn't mean it shoots to the right, I meant it off center by design. Study closely from a top view and you should see that the cylinder cut outs are about 1/2mm to the right, so is the barrel.
 

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The sight is mounted on the barrel.
So turning the barrel will turn the sight as well.

There are a lot of possible reasons for this to happen.
How the barrel and frame a threaded, concentricty of the bore inthe barrel,
a bit of angle on the front face of the frame where the barrel screws into.

Ours came out of the box with the barrel (and thus front sight) perfectly centered. But it shot to the left.

I don't know if they have to shave the front face a few thou more to let the
barrel turn, or if they just brute force it (probably not, but who knows?).

But NOW our front sight is off to the left a noticable amount (like yours) and
the gun shoots straight.

Not a lot of other options with the fixed rear groove sight.
 
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