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I've got a Remington 870 setup with a folding rear stock and an extension tube, 6 shot side saddle, and I added a Surefire forearm light (that I love!).

The only problem is, I have no sling!

I need some recommendations on slings. I don't have a hunting/gun background, so I've never been around rifles & shotguns before to see/try various types, etc so I'm hoping to glean some information from you guys.

Like I said, this is a home-defense type situation if that matters at all.

Thanks guys!!
 

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FWIW, a sling on a home defense shotgun would seem to be unneccesary. I think that it would only get in the way.
 

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A sling is a great option. Only though, if it is long enough that you can have it over your back and across your chest when the gun is in the firing position. That way if you should drop it for any reason it will still be at your side and easy to get back into action.

This is the way you can do it for transistions from a long gun to a handgun. Not that you would need that for HD. That is mostly an LEO type of action.
 

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DO NOT LISTEN to anyone who says that a sling is not an essential accessory to any long gun in virtually any practical situation. A sling is NECESSARY for many reasons. If you have to use your hands for something other than shooting, you don't want to have to put your gun down, especially if it is still loaded. You may need your hands to detain a bad guy until law enforcement arrives. You may need to use your hands to circumvent an obstacle (open a door, climb out a window, move furniture, etc.). You may need to use your hands to help family members to safety. Your long gun may malfunction, or run dry, or be too long to clear a particular corner and you may need to transition to a handgun. You need to be able to sling your long gun on your person, so it is with you at all times.

I personally prefer that it is slung in a manner that it is readily accessible to fire, and also where I can drop it to my side without hesitation to free my hands for other tasks.

My preferred sling is the single point from The Wilderness.
 

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If you get a sling, get a 3-point tactical sling that allows you to carry the weapon at ready, shoulder and/or point and shoot, but also allows you to release the weapon and keep it close to your body and allows the use of your hands without repositioning the sling. Cheaper Than Dirt has a decent one for your weapon setup that isn't overly priced. Look under slings or shotgun accessories.
 

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I prefer the single point over the 3 point because on the single point there are no forward straps to get in the way of or tangle up in the tac light or interfere with manipulation of the pump/forend. The 3 point is probably capable of carrying the gun in a slightly more readily accessible position, but the very simple single point will do just fine without all the fancy straps going every which away.
 

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As will a conventional, but very long sling. I have used these on AR's and shotguns and they work very well. They are simple and inexpensive.
 

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But the conventional sling still has an attachment point up front where it is in the way of the light and the forend. I still say that this is the #1 advantage of the single point sling...simple and out of the way. I use different style slings for different guns and different purposes. But, I am a believer in the single point for any CQB type use.
 

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I prefer the three point sling also. A well made one will not get in your way. It is more versatile, and covers about any situation you could come across.

If you want it for home defense, sling it over your strong side shoulder and under your weak side armpit.

For the patrol, ready position, Over your weak side shoulder, under your strong side armpit. (good for long walks on logging roads and strip shoeflies looking for grouse.)

If you ever do choose to use your shotgun for hunting then separate the shoulder straps and sling your gun like you would a back pack. This, I have found, is useful if you live in a steep terrain like I do and you need both hands to climb highwalls , and steep slopes and still carry your long gun. There are many more ways to carry your long gun with these slings.

Shoot your gun with your sling to get familiar with it and you shouldn't have any trouble.
 

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Sundance said:
You may need your hands to detain a bad guy until law enforcement arrives.
While I agree that slings are very useful for many reasons, the above is not one of them (unless you're a law enforcement officer with proper training).

I'm trained to defend myself, not "detain" people. If a bad guy wants to leave, I'm not going to try to stop him and he's just done my job for me. I'll be happy to testify against him later.:D
 

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I'll agree that you may have a point as to this factor. I was thinking like a cop and just trying to list all possible uses for a sling. This one might not have been practical for the non LE trained. But I still stand firm that a sling is an essential item on any long gun used for any practical (anything away from the range) purpose.
 

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Sundance said:
I'll agree that you may have a point as to this factor. I was thinking like a cop and just trying to list all possible uses for a sling. This one might not have been practical for the non LE trained. But I still stand firm that a sling is an essential item on any long gun used for any practical (anything away from the range) purpose.
Now we're on the same page!

I admit that I don't have a sling on my 1100, but I'd have to exhaust several other choices before I had to go to it.

In any case, I only have one sling that stays on me instead of permanently attached to my long gun. It's a single point arrangement made from a commercial bungee sling. I just wear it and clip the long gun onto it with a light duty carabiner.

Now I need to put a carabiner on my 1100!
:D
 

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Skunkabilly said:
I have a Wilderness Singlepoint on my Benelli M1 Super 90. Will post pics.
Please do.

Off topic now, in response to your question of the day for last thursday: Why is the last samurai white? Samurai can be singular or plural. They werent saying Tom Cruise alone was the last samurai. All those guys charging with him on horseback with katanas out were samurai as well.

I for one am looking forward to seeing what Tom Cruise does with that movie. His last two movies, Vanilla Sky and Minority Report have had cool things to say about society. Cant wait to see what he says about the Samurai being reduced from men to disarmed property by their own government. Hopefully its not a movie full of BS anti gun sword good guns bad imagery. The important lesson was about disarming people, not the type of arms. If they didnt miss the point it will be a good film.
 

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We have a sling on our HD shotgun and really like it. Unlike the CQB or 3 point slings, ours is just a 2 pointer, but I think it serves the function better. CQB and 3 point slings are a really great for various types of activities not associated with home defense, like holding or carrying a long gun for an extended period of time in a fairly ready position. Unless you are one of the Hatfields or McCoys in a modern fight, you aren't going to be having a long term home defense carry issues.

We use a GG&G receiver end plate sling attachment on both our shotgun (REM 870) and AR15. The attachments can be used for a single point sling, but I use them in conjunction with the butt stock base sling attachment as well. So the sling runs from the base to the receiver and does not get in the way of pumping the shotgun. The sling is long enough to loop over the neck and shoulder, running under the strong side arm, around the back and over the weak side shoulder.

The sling will swing the gun muzzle down and to the side if dropped and can make access to a side arm easy (not what I would be wearing in the middle of the night). The biggest and best benefits are that the sling goes on very easily without fumblng for the right loop to pass through as there is only one. Also, it serves as a retention item. Short of breaking the stock or strap, when on, the sling is worn with enough slack removed such that the gun cannot be taken and turned on the wearer, with the exception of the feet and shins. This was originally an option I was concerned about and thought would be a good idea for my wife. As it turns out, it is just a fine idea in general.

The single loop is simple, effective, and performs very well as a short term tactica. and safe carry method. It is very easy to put on in the dark, by feel, even when sleepy. It does NOT get in the way and serves to keep the shotgun very handy.
 

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Speaking for myself, and no one else, I don't like a sling on a HD shotgun; sort of like mudflaps on a top fuel dragster.
 

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MattB said:
Speaking for myself, and no one else, I don't like a sling on a HD shotgun; sort of like mudflaps on a top fuel dragster.
I dont understand the analogy. A better one would be putting a sling on a shotgun is like putting slicks on a dragster so you have better traction, or wearing your seatbelt in a dragster so you can be held in your seat better.

Both of those make sense to me. A sling lets you do stuff with your hands. If you get in a retention situation it makes it difficult to be taken away and used on you.
 
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