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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm looking for the "ideal" personal defense round for my Kimber Compact CDPII. Speer advertises a bonded JHP; Hornady does not offer a bonded jacket (and as you look at the points on the rounds you can see that Speer's jackets are crimped down into the hollow point, while Hornady's end in a smooth circle around the outside).

Also the shape of the two bullets are quite different; rounded sides on the Speers and more conical on the Hornadys.

Any thoughts about the differences in performance of the two rounds????

Also, they both come in standard loads or +p. 200 gr or 230 gr. Any opinions on which load is best for personal defense?
 

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Shoot, flip a coin and be done with it.

You can't really go wrong with either speer or hornady as they both produce high quality shooting products. My suggestion is for you to buy oh, say, a hundred rounds of each and then take them to the range to see which rounds are the most accurate in your weapon and to see which round you are most comfortable shooting. After finding that out, go back to the store and stock up in large quantities with whatever load you decide to use in your gun.

BTW, as a general rule, I would stick with standard pressure 230 grain loads (fmj's for practice and jhp's for social work).
 

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I like the accuracy and penetration of the Hornady bullets better. I also reload Hornady instead of Speer for practice. Some don't like the expansion of the Hornady bullets, but you can't argue with their penetration.

I use 200 or 230 gr +p XTP factory rounds in my carry gun.
 

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If you research some of the "terminal ballisitcs" boards you will be told the Speer Gold Dot is the closest thing to a magic bullet you can get except for the almost holy (LE ONLY) Ranger Talon. The same people will tell you that the Hornady XTP is virtually the same as shooting Ball, particularly against 4 layers of denim.

My personal experience, having not shot anyone with either, is the Hornady XTP feeds like ball in every gun I've tried it in where as the Speer Gold Dot has bobbled a couple of times in (you ain't gonna believe this) two different Glocks - a G22 (40 S&W) and a G30 (45 ACP).
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
Not surprisingly, looks like it's a coin toss between Speer and Hornady.

Took my compact Kimber .45 to the range yesterday and shot a couple boxes of each (.45 ACP +p, 200gr in Speer and 230gr in Hornaday), along with some standard load Win JHP. All fed properly and grouped pretty much the same. Of course there was noticeably more recoil with the +p loads. Before my Kimber was adequately broken in, I'd had some feed probs with both Speer and Hornady +ps, but not now.

I did look at some of the terminal ballistic reports on the web, as one of you responders suggested. I found one report that suggested good penetration (15") and expansion (.71") in gellatin with the Hornady 230gr +p. I didn't find anything on Speer, but some other brands in 200gr +p did not penetrate as well. Speer and Hornady both make 200gr and 230gr in .45 ACP; Hornady makes both weights in +p, but with Speer, their heaviest +p is the 200gr.


What I'd heard about the Hornadys (which is the reason for this post in the first place) was that, since the jacket in not "bonded", it tends to shed quickly in impact, resulting in high weight loss from the core bullet, and the possibility of framenting. Couldn't find anything on this topic at all, though.

I've now loaded my carry mags with Hornady 230gr XTP +p.

Any other thoughts??? Otherwise, thanks for your repsonses.
 

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I would be real surprised if the hornady xtp shed its jacket at all. The xtp was originally designed to be used as a large caliber handgun hunting bullet. As I understand it (and I could be wrong) most or all xtp's are supposed to be able to obtain rather deep penetration (relative to their caliber) without fragmenting or failing. The most common (internet bulletin board) complaint that I have read about xtp bullets is their supposed tendacy to penetrate to much because their tough copper jackets inhibit adequate expansion at normal service pistol velocities.

As I stated in my initial response, I don't really think you could go wrong with either one. Pick the one that you are most comfortable shooting and which is the most reliable in your weapon and don't sweat it. It's a 45 ACP for cryin out loud.:biglaugh: :D
 

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Would like to follow up a question on this thread please. Although I am very satisfied with my 45 xtp rounds, which I use for personal defense, I also carry a 380 pistol. Based on some of the info here, the xtp round is not designed for low caliber? Does this mean that xtp ammo will not be good for a 380 caliber? :(
 

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Hello. Opinions will vary as some prefer more aggressive expanders while others will like the XTP's more limited expansion as it probably adds a bit of penetration. Still others will opine that ball is the only way to assure plenty of penetration in a wider number of situations. My own opinion is that with the .380, placement and probably multiple hits in the same will be the deciding factor.

I'd go with that which was reliable and accurate in my gun.

Best.
 

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Thanks a lot stephen,
I always thought that aside from good shot placement, the lower calibers might be more effective if it had the benefits of a good hollow point for it to expand into the likes of a larger caliber....Do you think that xtp's does not expand very well on low calibers?

I use my 380 as back up gun, but my war horse is still my Gold Cup loaded with 45 xtp.
 

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Hello. They've worked for me in informal expansion tests using water and super-saturated newsprint. They've expanded in the few varmints I've managed to shoot with them; but these are very limited. It seems that most have a hard time expanding in 10% ballistic gelatin after passing through 4-layers of denim. I'm not one that bases my choices entirely on this test, but thought I'd mention it. Were I carrying a .380, it would be loaded with JHP ammo, possibly XTP's, Federal Classic 90-gr. JHP, or Remington's 102-gr. Golden Saber.

Best.
 
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