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Good day,

I have a WWII replica, ammo crisis aside, I'm trying to learn more about what ammo grains/brands/types will work best?

I have a box of '43 fmj that shoots smooth, but that stuff is generally kind of expensive and hard to come by.

I'm a pretty new to 1911's and aside from my 9mm service pistol, haven't had much experience with handguns.

Can anyone recommend where I can go to learn more? What ammo would be best to use and what websites are reputable to purchase from?

Thank you
 

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You can shoot any .45 acp out of that. It is throated for hollow points. It is essentially a Springfield Armory Milspec made to look like a WW2 1911A1 (vertical slide serrations, lanyard loop on the mainspring housing and the tiny sights). They were quite popular. I wish they still made that model.
 

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If ya gotta use factory ammo , the cheapest ammo is always plain ol' 230gr FMJ or GI 'ball' ammo. It's what the basic 1911A1 was designed to use. I reload and use a 230 hard cast RN that mimics the copper jacketed bullet , but costs 1/4 what it costs.

Unfortunately any factory ammo or reloading component is hard to find and very expensive right now.

BTW; , that '43 ammo used corrosive primers. Be sure to clean your bore with a proper solvent or HOT soapy water.
 

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With the ammo crisis a lot of weird ammo that nobody ever heard of has been rising to the surface. Odd brands and bullet weights. Avoid the temptation to buy whatever you can find and stick with good ol' 230gr FMJ.

BTW speaking of that 1943 ammo, not only is it corrosive but it's also becoming collectible, so it's probably better to sell what you have or trade it for some new ammo instead.
 
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DSK is correct, that 43 ammo is corrosive. Be sure to clean your gun. Soap & water used to be the recommended cleaner. Dry & lube it well.
 

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In the old days military bore cleaner had a high concentration of ammonia, which helped dissolve the corrosive salts left behind. Today's bore cleaners are generally not meant for corrosive ammo and often won't get rid of those salts. When I shoot my blackpowder firearms I always clean them out with hot soapy water first, then follow up with WD-40 and finally wipe them dry and re-oil. A similar procedure would likely help clean a firearm that was shot with corrosive ammo as well.
 
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BTW speaking of that 1943 ammo, not only is it corrosive but it's also becoming collectible, so it's probably better to sell what you have or trade it for some new ammo instead.
Full boxes in VG-excellent shape , yes . Partial box , loose rounds , not so much.
 
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