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Recently I got a Staccato-XC. This thread will be to record some thoughts about it. Bottom line at the top: so far, only 120rds in, it seems great! Not for everybody ... If you see no reason to spend >$700 on a pistol, this one could shake your worldview: stear clear. If a m1911-action on a frame impossible to make in 1908 is heresy: run!

First of all, the "origin story": reading a fairly recent thread led me to the Wilson Combat site. There greatly admiring the ”X-TAC Elite Carry Comp Professional”, I started actually thinking about a role for such a pistol. But I'd want an optical sight plate system - not be locked into irons nor any particular sight footprint. More, I'd rather not wait 9months for anything less than a baby. So looking for alternatives, I asked the forum for some advice / help:

Reverse review: What m1911 maker would you choose next...

Based on prior good experiences, the Dan Wesson custom shop and Dawson Precision were in my list of finalists from the get-go. Dawson Precision is marketing a package based on a Staccato; the package is a close match for my requirements. Since I was going to ask a price-&-schedule from DP sometime anyway, I called them. What surprised me was when I asked "How soon could you ship one?" the answer was "Tomorrow." uhhh ... "Done!".

The package is a very complete kit: kit bag; three magazines*1;mounting hardware for at least two differing optical sight footprints; two iron rear sights; lots of screws and pins; an owner's manual; test target; sight drifts; a chamber flag. It appeared to be lubed but I made certain. My word! what a smooth action. The finish, I understand, is a DLC: It's attractive though simple. My skin oils and/or sweat is unusually caustic (not as bad as Dad's though). Looking at the chemistry involved in DLC, I have high hopes: it shouldn't react. Also it oughta wear like ... diamond. Still, I think no Kydex holsters. Trigger breaks cleanly just before reaching 2 1/2lbs. Thumb safety is as crisp and positive as the best in my experience.

Some family events intervened, preventing me from taking it to the range for a few days; so I did some dry-fire with it. Finally got to the range the weekend of 04/16 - 04/18. Using the pre-installed iron sights, at 13.5m / 15yds it shoots almost precisely 2" high for me. In evaluating the sight picture, with five three-shot strings, three of the strings were 1-hole. After getting the sight picture, I bagged the pistol and took it to the shop area to have the optical mounted ... and to look at lights.

With Leupold's "Delta Point" sights no longer available with a delta point, I chose a Holosun 507C, mainly for it's reticle. Zero'ing the optic was fairly impressive too. Again about 1/2 the 3-shot strings each produced only one hole. Now it's zero'd, I'm pleased with the results. More to follow.

*1- IIRC, I wanted a total of six, so going on memory of how many were included.

View attachment 609315

View attachment 609316
A good friend of mine just picked up his Staccato-P. I am looking forward to comparing it to my Wilson Combat 1911. It is a great looking gun.
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 · (Edited)
Finished reliability acceptance testing today: 300rds; no cleaning; [ generously ] re-freshing lube. The pistol came through with flying colors. The pistol is well-named: stack-auto. It stacks the brass automatically. Today of 60 rounds fired, 59! were stacked automatically in a pile. True, I'd arranged the bench so as to discourage brass from bouncing down-range. But I do not recall a center-fire self-loader that ejected gently and uniformly enough for that to give such results..

Speaking of results ... Wish I'd shot the last 10rds of the test as well as the 2nd-to-last:
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
Dry-fire flag built, so likely to start the Staccato-XC to work tonight.

E85C9657-C54A-44EA-925A-47C2BC6CE725.jpeg
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 · (Edited)

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Discussion Starter · #25 · (Edited)
During another break, I mounted a relatively inexpensive weapon light. Other than temporary installation on a hunting rifle for wildlife management, this is the first I’ve mounted a weapon light. Gotta say, I like it. The light is a Firefield FF25015. On/Off/Strobe switches conveniently at either side at the front of the trigger-guard. It emits only 120 lumens ... which I can confirm is quite startling when it unexpectedly flashes on into one’s eyes ... for example when you seat the battery the correct way and the switch was already on.

A more expensive, higher power light is on order ... but a regular supplier had this FF25015 on sale and it arrived first. So the 600 lumen light, when it arrives, will have to duke it out for the Staccato. The loser likely to be mounted on the primary home defense long-gun.

Oh! and with the light mounted, it still fits easily in the holster that I have in mind for it. Now ready to try working on a draw-stroke.
W-e-l-l ... the higher output, more expensive light arrived today ... The main challenge it faced was to fit in the holster: it did; easy. The winner, and new champeen: an Olight “Baldr Pro”. In addition to the 600lumen lamp, it has a green sighting L.A.S.E.R. Haven’t shot with it ... the package was waiting on my return from the shooting range. But a nice thing about three sighting systems, I just made the L.A.S.E.R. agree with the reflex: it’ll be very close.

The sight must be removed to change batteries ... BUT ... it’s a quick release camming mount. And it takes two CR123A cells: oughta last a long time on a charge. So very little inconvenience involved.

. 1B90FE24-604D-4B4B-9037-EA16F413481A.jpeg
 
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Discussion Starter · #26 · (Edited)
This morning I installed the 3rd weapon-light on this pistol (3rd such light I've owned all in the last month or so). Despite some design / manufacture flaws, I think this light may stay.

The light is a Nightstick "TCM-550XL-GL".

Flaws:
1st to bother me is the off/on switches. The right-hand switch seemed inoperative, so I planned to return the light. Eventually I figured out the switches are pressed down to actuate. Pressing inward, as on other weapon lights, mostly worked on the left-hand switch. By now, I'm accustomed to it.

2nd, was finding that the light does not slide onto the rail. Probably not uncommon ... only one light so far does slide on. That one, you run a bar through to lock onto a rail notch.

3rd, was discovery that with the tension screw as tight as I was willing: the light still rattled and wobbled. About now is when I figured out the switches ... so reject, accept, reject, all during installation. But I thought of a trick previously used to stop sloppy parts wiggling and adapted it. Using scissors, I cut three flats on a foam ear-plug. Laying the middle flat on the back-end of the light, so it says put while mating light and gun. With that foam in place, the light doesn't wiggle. If I dismount it, I'll replace the foam with self-adhesive velcro-tape: ought to be just as good/better in the role of a spacer / spring; I have the tape in black :- j ; the foam oxidizes, gradually losing its springiness but if velcro does, it's much slower - effectively permanent.

Now, the features that led to going to this much trouble ...

Size and weight: this light is much smaller than its rival; also significantly ... lighter. The OLight is enough heavier to affect the balance of the pistol ... though not unacceptably so. The same holster accepts either light mounted, so size is mostly aesthetic.

Best battery-bay yet: the lamp-reflector assembly is the bay cover. No need to dismount to change batteries ... with eyes closed and no witnesses anyway.

off / on switches are easy to reach. Now I'm working on support-thumb activation.

Lamp and L.A.S.E.R. seem about equivalent between the two lights. The OLight lamp may have an edge. And I mostly like that the OLight has a physical switch to change modes, sight-light-both. Mode can be seen, with the unit off. But it's easy to bump that switch and change mode unintentionally. The Nightstick mode change, the light must be on: so better have an appropriate mode set before you need it. Maybe I'm just difficult to please.

Have yet to zero the OLight ... my Friday session was disrupted by unsafe shooters on the line. So zero'ing the Nightstick today is, IIRC, the 1st I've ever used a L.A.S.E.R.-sight. It'll take a little getting used to ... but not a lot. Clearly the wildly waving dots I see at the range are not a flaw inherent to the sights. 20rds from 13.5m/15yd/45'; 1st 4 5rd strings after zero'ing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
...
Lamp and L.A.S.E.R. seem about equivalent between the two lights. The OLight lamp may have an edge. ... Maybe I'm just difficult to please.
...
Comparing the lamps back-to-back, the OLight is much brighter ... oh! Because they sent me the 1350lumen light, when what I asked for was 600. Makes sense.
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
Hopefully now that I’ve suddenly taken to both L.A.S.E.R.-sights and weapon lights, this is NOT going to be the kind of long and expensive exercise that was choosing holsters ...

A different vendor had a sale price on a L.A.S.E.R.-light combo that I’d previously passed over due to a higher price. It‘s essentially the same features as the Nightstick; very similar in appearance; but once in hand, first impression of build-quality is much better. This sight/light is a Streamlight TLR-8A. Even on sale, much more expensive than the Nightstick: probably ought not to have bought it. The entire pistol, however, is a once-in-a-lifetime extravagance (I hope?) -: so the Streamlight TLR-8A fits right in.
\ -;

Almost exactly the same design as the Nightstick: battery type; battery bay location and access method; mounting approach; safety setting*1; trigger-paddles operation; etc. Build quality seems better in:

- mount:
With the tension screw loosened, the clamps popped right on. Perhaps this is my tiny amount of experience in using such things coming into play rather than an actual build difference ... but ...

- fit:
The TLR has a slightly better fit than does the Nightstick; it was still loose enough to rattle slightly. And I take seriously the sight function. Having learned on the Nightstick, I snipped a bit of self-adhesive velcro and stuck it on the back end of the TLR and re-mounted it: perfect!

- sight adjustment:
Though not likely to be used often, this was the most encouraging difference in build-quality. Dialing the Nightstick felt very hit-or-miss, and as I recall one of the controls had the direction mislabeled in chassis markings ... that might just have been that the Nightstick’s dot didn’t move until turning a tension-screw back-and-forth a time or two. The Streamlight TLR-8A dot, however, moved smoothly first go in each dimension in accordance with the R <-> L / U <-> D markings. This gives me more confidence of the sight holding zero. It’ll take a 100rds or so before regarding that confidence as rational.

- trigger-paddles:
Though operating in the same U/D orientation, those on the TLR seem better executed: springs are covered; motion is smooth; there’s a crisper tactile feedback to it switching off/on.

A small design difference is the orientation of the windage tension-screw. The Nightstick has the more intuitive approach, oriented horizontally. The TLR screw is angled. Only took a few seconds to figure out. And this may be an engineering factor in the TLR’s improved ergonomics: IDK.

On the whole, I’d say the TLR is the better device: worth at least $10 difference in price*2; it would, however, have to also last ~20% longer than the Nightstick to entirely justify the price difference. Maybe it will: small differences in build-quality can effect big differences down the line.
\ -:

*1- Supposedly disengages the battery for longer-term periods of disuse: no shooting your eye out with coherent light; battery savings. The same kind of safety on the Nightstick is subject to emitting a single flash during dis- & re-engaging. Haven’t seen this happen yet on the Streamlight - so a possible factor toward justifying the price difference: preserving one’s retinas from L.A.S.E.R. damage - priceless!

*2- sigh ... And I paid a lot more than $10 more for the Streamlight.
 
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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
At the range today, comparing the PoI when shooting 147JHPs with sights zero’d using 115grJRNs. Expecting a slightly higher PoI: not to be, mon che’ri. After making certain that I was on, with 20rds of 115gr, 5rds each on four 3” Shoot-N-C spots, from 13.5m/15yds/45ft: 5rds on the 5th spot; not my best group - five distinct holes, in a “+” pattern centered on the little orange dot. Still, looks as though zero’ing this pistol with 115gr has served for 147gr as well.

Not sure why that would be: comp? greater grip-to-hand surface contact from the 2011 grip-frame? lightening cuts? such slick-smooth action? Ideas welcome ... but experimental results seem pretty clear: difficult to believe five consecutive hits within a ~1” radius, from a distance of 540” as chance.
 
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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
Oh! And today was my second outing using a L.A.S.E.R.-sight: only the 1st five rounds of settling in described in my previous (reflex for the remainder). Using the L.A.S.E.R. printed the 2nd best group of five groups @5rds. So it seems that sleeping on it has processed the L.A.S.E.R. as an accepted sighting approach in my motor-cortex.
 
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I finally shot the XC on Saturday at an event with Todd Jarret! Amazing! I can really understand the form and function much better, though I did almost as well with the P Duo. My heartfelt congratulations once again- RC
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 · (Edited)
Yesterday, I finally did another little hack on the pistol: added a self-adhesive patch of the coarse velcro, 5/8 x 13/32 or 1.5 x 1cm, to the grip safety speed bump. The reason: In a significant number of practice draws, being certain to disengage the safety was still slowing me. Haven't experienced this with my other 2011s or other double-stack m1911-derivatives. The Staccato has slightly smaller grip corner radii, thus longer perimeter, than do some of these ... but it may be that these days I can draw faster, so more sensitive to any delay. At any rate, the velcro fixed it.

A more elegant solution may occur, but this was immediately to-hand, quick to do and it works.
 
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I found that commitment to riding the thumb safety resulted in a stiffer right hand purchase from the rear and a very positive grip safety engagement. This coupled with the Staccato grip width I felt like I was "choking" the grip to allow my trigger finger to be more relaxed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
I found that commitment to riding the thumb safety resulted in a stiffer right hand purchase from the rear and a very positive grip safety engagement. This coupled with the Staccato grip width I felt like I was "choking" the grip to allow my trigger finger to be more relaxed.
hmmm my competition pistol for IDPA has always been a Bul M-5 and for some time shooting steel a P-O 189S. After learning with a 1911A1, never had to think about disengaging the G.S. on those. And my main competition / S.D. instructor taught riding the thumb safety from the get-go. Now with single-stacks, I do usually replace flat MSHs with arched, the better to fit my hand. The Staccato speed-bump looks similar to what I've used.

So I have three suspects:

  • grip perimeter
  • grip shape
  • much greater muzzle-&-overall (loaded) weight

... including a combination of those. Whatever it was affected about 1 draw in 50. Hasn't yet recurred since the velcro.

Thanks,
 
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