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That AMT was made in Covina, CA. I put those grips back on as they came on it but were stinky. It usually wears a set of wood stocks. The wrap around rubber grips finally outgassed over the years so I put them back on to take some pictures of exactly how the pistol looked when I bought it.



I also bought a little Detonics back in 1985 (probably too much Miami Vice) and have not had any problems with it either.

 

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It's true that stainless guns cannot be fitted as tightly as a carbon gun.
One of my older stainless Colts is one that many here would call "loose as a goose", you could probably lube it with peanut butter and it would still run.
Another one is "semi loose", and some oil is all it needs.
Now, the older DW has no detectable slop at all, and even with lots of oil you could feel the slide slowing down after ~40>50 rounds.
The issue was not with the mating surfaces, it was the sharp edges of the rails on the frame and slide left from the machining operations.
Oil will "glide" on a smooth surface but oil does not adhere to a sharp/knife edge.
Once I had used some 1000 grit on the sharp edges the issue decreased markedly.
Smoothed/polished, mating flats and edges work wonders, but you still need lots of oil on stainless for a closely fitted gun.
AFAIK, their is no difference in alloys between slide and frame on a DW.
Flame suit on,, :)
 

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My only serious stainless 1911 is my ed brown and it has a coating over the stainless, it's also one of my tightest guns interestingly enough.
 

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The problem with galling appeared when manufacturers first started producing stainless guns and they would make two parts that wore on each other like the frame and slide from the exact same stainless alloy. They found out that if you use a slightly different alloy for one of those parts the galling problem is solved. And everyone does that today. .
^^This^^

Is what I read a long time ago. I have two, stainless 1911s; one of those was built for me 30-years ago. Have never had a problem w/ either one.
 

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I don't own a SS 1911, but I can't believe every manufacturer would offer them if they give a lot of problems?
 

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Never had any galling problems with my stainless steel 1911s or my stainless German SIG X Series Mastershop Pistols which are fitted to extremely close tolerances for accuracy.

Any manufacturer that’s still experiencing galling difficulties with their guns in this day and age is doing something wrong.

But stainless pistols should be properly lubricated nonetheless.
 

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Slide fit is near perfect and locks up tight.
Built in Alabama in 2016 and just recently fired for the first time.
It is showing a lot of promise as an extremely accurate piece.


 

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From what I've seen, the current SS 1911s are commonly 416, slide and frame. 416 is relatively affordable, it easily hardens to the common gun hardness range (RC 30-40), machines very well because of the added sulfur, and it is better at avoiding galling than other SS.

I don't see any reason to avoid a contemporary 1911 built from 416.
 

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I remember hearing about galling years ago when I was much younger and was lusting after a stainless AMT. Their Commander size model, don't remember the "moniker." I kind of changed my mind after that and never did get one.

No internet in those frontier days, just word of mouth and whatever was printed in the gun magazines. Different times.
 

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I'm just curious because I came across a pre-owned EB Kobra Carry for a good price...
As already mentioned, I certainly wouldn’t be concerned about galling, especially on an EB pistol. The overwhelming majority of EB pistols are stainless, be they in-the-white, or genIII/IV coated, nearly all are stainless, with few exceptions.

My 2010 EB KC is genIII over stainless. Get the Brown, they’re mighty fine pistolas.
 

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I had an early Colt full size stainless, Commander stainless, and Defender stainless that never gave any galling issues. Other issues yes, but not galling.
 

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I would purchase and own a stainless gun with no fears, since I know that modern manufacturers have done what they needed to do, and with good lube hygiene I just wouldn't be too worried about it.

I've built two 1911s so far from the ground up, and the first one was stainless. There's a reason the second one was not stainless. I will almost certainly never attempt another stainless 1911 on a scratch build.

Short version: I didn't understand what galling was about, and while fitting my slide to my frame I decided to try the "tap on, tap off" method using some fine grit on the rails. Tapping a stainless slide onto a stainless frame will result in almost instantaneous galling. The parts literally weld themselves together at the microscopic level where asperities in the surface contact each other at high pressure. I had to beat the slide back off with a rubber mallet and a shocking level of violence. So I tried to be more careful, and was for a while, then I galled it again. So, I gave up tapping on/tapping off and used at most some hand pressure to work the grit where it got tight. Guess what? If you push a tight slide onto a frame a little too hard by hand it can or even will gall. Who knew? Not me, that's who.

So yeah, I experienced galling something like 4 or 5 times while fitting my SS slide/frame together, and the frame rails still show faint evidence of the little trails impressed into the surface where little microscopic chunks of stainless steel had ripped out of the frame rail onto the slide rails and then been drug across the surface of the frame rails as I beat the slide back off with the rubber mallet. It's embarassing, and I hope none of you ever see this in person.

So, I've seen what galling is and the destruction it can cause first hand. But guess what? I experienced said galling because I was ignorant of galling and what caused it and how to avoid it, not because it is inevitable. I'm willing to give manufacturers the benefit of the doubt that they are not ignorant about successfully machining and fitting guns made from stainless steel, and that they do it right and it's just not an issue. I mean, there are zillions of gun companies making zillions of stainless guns, and there aren't zillions of stories of these guns locking up due to galling.

So yeah, I'd buy a properly made stainless gun, by which I mean I'd buy a SS gun from a company with a good track record of successfully making SS guns.

What I will not do, however, is attempt to build another stainless gun by hand, as I've done with my two 1911 projects so far. I got 99 problems, but galling on a new stainless steel gun project ain't one.
 

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It's apparent that the market embraces stainless steel guns and for some years a great many shooters consider the material to be the essential component of their firearms so gun makers give the customer what he wants.

I've been reluctant to embrace stainless steel handguns over the years. I never have liked the appearance of stainless steel guns and still don't. I've also always felt that I could discern that stainless steel guns are never are quite as smooth as their plain ol' blued steel counterparts, but that may just be a figment of my imagination. I'm sure through shooting use or careful tuning that stainless steel guns can be slicker'n snot on a door knob.

I also heard and read of stainless steel galling tales before the rise of the internet firearms forums and have inspected a few stainless steel offenders that belonged to others. This contributed to my reluctance to acquire stainless steel guns.

In more recent times few stainless steel guns have come to roost in the safe. Only about three of them have seen regular shooting use and those are perfectly serviceable. The Colt Delta Elite is regularly shot as is a Smith & Wesson Model 649 revolver.





The 2 1/2-inch Smith & Wesson Model 66 has been on hand here the longest of any stainless steel gun. It's very nice, but the blued K-frame Smith & Wessons on hand are all smoother in action feel and that ol' 3 1/2-inch N-Frame .357 seen with it here is like "driving a Cadillac" by comparison when both are used for double-action work.


I'm glad I'm getting to know stainless steel guns. Should have better acquainted myself with some years ago. Don't want an infestation of 'em roosting in the safe though.
 

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Slide fit is near perfect and locks up tight.
Built in Alabama in 2016 and just recently fired for the first time.
It is showing a lot of promise as an extremely accurate piece.
Does yours also weigh a metric crapton compared to a carbon steel 1911? Mine sure does!

Tom
 

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Something to consider if you use your gun for defense: a SS gun looks really big to a BG after dark!:)
 

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None. Type 416 is actually 1.3% LESS dense than 4140.
All the non-GI "1911s" being cloned, there is a lot of variation in contour and thickness; maybe even enough to feel at the extremes.
 

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Something to consider if you use your gun for defense: a SS gun looks really big to a BG after dark!:)
You can accomplish the same thing with a stainless barrel and/or bushing on a blued gun. With a .45 that big hole up front is made even bigger by having a silver ring around it. :)
 
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