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I don't know how long you're talking about...

But in years past, when I would buy, say, a new Colt 1911... I would buy one to have customized as I saw fit, and buy a second to keep for if/when I wore that one out, to have one just like it made.

All these years later (30+), I still haven't worn out the ones I had customized for carry. And, I still have a few 1911's in their original packaging (from Styrofoam boxes, cardboard boxes, to plastic bags in plastic boxes), with no rust or other issues whatsoever. As well as dozens of rifles, shotguns, & pistols kept around the house, ranch, shop, and trucks, that have had absolutely no care whatsoever for a few decades, and still look pristine (and a lot that have been used hard, don't look very pristine, but aren't rusty; and, many that stay in the safe and haven't been removed for years--pristine). Unless you are taping them inside your septic tank, or burying them in a rag in your backyard, I just don't think you can go wrong.

In addition, concerning ammo... I have recently loaded rifle, pistol, and shotgun ammo with primers (and in some instances, powder) that I had left over from the 1960s. It shoots just fine. And I have a LOT of ammo (factory & reloads) from every decade since the '60s, through 2018. It all shoots just fine, despite having been stored inside the house, in a garage, a shop, in vehicles, the ranch, in old range bags, hunting vests, extreme heat, extreme cold, wherever. I have NEVER had any ammo that became unreliable in 50+ years of storage.

If I never bought or loaded another round of ammunition (God forbid that ever happens), I would probably have enough to last another lifetime. And, I would trust it to function, no matter how it had been stored. I just don't think that, barring submersion or storing outside in the elements, you can go wrong.
 

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My very first rifle was a hand-me-down that is nearly 60 years old, it’s never been in a “climate controlled” environment other than my house, and while it hasn’t been fired in about 30 years, I was meticulous about cleaning it after firing it, and now it gets wiped down with a oiled rag 1x/year. It’s in great shape. I’d be very comfortable coating it in a light grease (or heavy oil) and then storing it. Not sure about vacuum sealing it, but placing it in a watertight container (mil ammo box) with a good gasket after it’s lubed up should be just fine for several decades
 

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Texas, but I plan on keeping it indoors and air conditioned/heated (those 3 days a year we need heat)

you're overthinking it Brother

the requirements for the environment it will be in just aren't that challenging.
Not a whole lot of need for concern

it's not like you're storing it under the chicken coop

..L.T.A.
 

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Once I put my handguns in long-term storage, and I soaked them in Break-Free and put them in heavy-duty Zip-Loc bags, then inside pistol rugs. They were still perfectly fine and oiled up a couple of years later.
 

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I shootem up with breakfree or similar, then seal them in those blue vpi bags.

Ammo goes in military ammo cans with some desiccant.
I have 45 ammo from the 40's that is 100% reliable.
When I tried ammo from 1917, 1926, 1929, 1932 they were all duds.:bawling:
 

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Flip side:

We had a minor, undetected roof leak a few years ago. A seldom-used closet got a bit damp inside before we discovered it.

The closet held, among other things, a couple of overflow rifles that wouldn't fit in the safe. One will never be pretty again, the other is going to need a new barrel to be safe to shoot.

Therefore, my ideas of unattended long-term storage involve things like those heavy plastic storage bags and dessiccant packs.
 

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^^^

Good point about unexpected sources of water damage.

I begin by thoroughly spraying my LT storage guns with Barricade.
Then place in a Borestores gun sock (treated to combat corrosion).
Next place in watertight and virtually airtight container purchased at Container Store.
Prior to closing the container, I place both an Eva-Dry unit and a standard safe dessicant pack in the container.
Also prior to closing, I place a humidity gauge in the transparent container, with face of guage facing outward (obviously).
Soon after closing, the humidity gauge reading goes below 20%.

I live in Texas. High humidity.

There are obviously multiple good ways to reach the same objective. The above is merely my approach.
 

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If you bury it, literally cover it (encase) in full synthetic motor oil. Most common plastic bags are not good for wrapping as most are biodegradable, you need something like polyethylene, PEX won't degrade when buried. Some type of PEX jug with lid, big enough to hold pistol, fill with oil, silicone on lid threads, put lid on, bury.
 

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Does anyone made long rifle length zip lock bags? That would be pretty neat. Spray on the Breakfree and slip it into a long zip lock bag, etc. Years ago I had bought some long rifle size bags with a rust retardant paper insert. I still have a few of them that I use still. But I haven't located a new source for them.
I ran across these when I searched so far: https://www.amazon.com/ShieldPro-SafeCache-Gun-Storage-Kit/dp/B00EV3VTRA
 

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All good ideas. Another option is what the Navy uses, it's available on the commercial market as "Fluidfilm", a key ingredient ids lanolin.

Whatever you choose be sure it is designed for it's intended use whether it's for cleaning, daily care or long term storage. I get a kick out of people using products for cleaning that contain acids and then complain about rust and corrosion!

Chemical product's MSDS information can help find out what's in there!

Smiles,
 

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If you bury it, literally cover it (encase) in full synthetic motor oil. Most common plastic bags are not good for wrapping as most are biodegradable, you need something like polyethylene, PEX won't degrade when buried. Some type of PEX jug with lid, big enough to hold pistol, fill with oil, silicone on lid threads, put lid on, bury.
P.S. remove the wood grips and store In the bag along with tools you'll need, remember you'll need to thoroughly degrease and properly re-lube the gun....unless you think It's a good Idea to shoot It with a firing pin channel full of oil.
 

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If I were doing this I would also go for a Glock and a few mags. Make sure grease does not migrate to what ever ammo you might stash.
 

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P.S. remove the wood grips and store In the bag along with tools you'll need, remember you'll need to thoroughly degrease and properly re-lube the gun....unless you think It's a good Idea to shoot It with a firing pin channel full of oil.
I had assumed retrieval would not be for immediate use.

Any fluid will eventually fill in everywhere, so whether it be oil, water, or other, the item would need to be drained out accordingly.

Whatever fluid used it has to be something that will not absorb water.
WD40 might also be an ok choice.

Underground animals/bugs are a risk to be accounted for.
 

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If I were doing this I would also go for a Glock and a few mags. Make sure grease does not migrate to what ever ammo you might stash.

Personally, I think I'd lean towards a revolver for long term storage. The lack of needing magazines would be a big benefit, and in the case of a 357, you'd get a survival gun that could use more than one cartridge.
 

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Discussion Starter #38
I'm not looking to bury this, it will be stored in a climate and humidity controlled area. It would not be for immediate use, but more of an "oh crap, house burned down, there's nothing I own left" kind of situation.
 

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I'm not looking to bury this, it will be stored in a climate and humidity controlled area. It would not be for immediate use, but more of an "oh crap, house burned down, there's nothing I own left" kind of situation.
Unless it's zero humidity the water in the air will cause corrosion on everything.
But, if you keep it in such a place like you say, put it in plastic jug with wide mouth lid, drop item in, fill with WD40, put lid on.
 
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