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I would look for a used M&P for the same reasons as others have stated. It would need very little prep for long term storage. A major amount of the pistol that's not polymer is stainless steel. Sights, Complete Chassis/slide rails, Sear housing block,Guide rod, Slide, and barrel. There may be other parts, but these I know are. We used M&P's as our duty guns and were subject to the humidity (Florida) and rain exposure for months at a time with almost no maintenance. I never saw one come training time that had any rust on it anywhere.
 

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I would look for a used M&P for the same reasons as others have stated. It would need very little prep for long term storage. A major amount of the pistol that's not polymer is stainless steel. Sights, Complete Chassis/slide rails, Sear housing block,Guide rod, Slide, and barrel. There may be other parts, but these I know are. We used M&P's as our duty guns and were subject to the humidity (Florida) and rain exposure for months at a time with almost no maintenance. I never saw one come training time that had any rust on it anywhere.
Months?
It's in the DP sub forum and the Q was "long term storage". I was thinking years. But, stainless is not a bad choice, but, if one was to keep the item in say WD40 or oil then it doesnt matter what metals. Wood grips should be removed, etc.
 

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Months?
It's in the DP sub forum and the Q was "long term storage". I was thinking years. But, stainless is not a bad choice, but, if one was to keep the item in say WD40 or oil then it doesnt matter what metals. Wood grips should be removed, etc.

Yeah, Months. Of course you left out the important parts like "Florida humidity, and rain" that would be worse to a weapon than years in a climate controlled air conditioned storage facility as the OP was stating this weapon would be secured in.The M&P would, in my opinion, not need any special care other than a light lube on the metal parts for an extended period. No need once so ever for a drastic oil dunk that in time of need would be a messy clean up proposition. If he asked for a method to bury it in the yard,(which he didn't) your suggestion would be very good.
 

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Personally, I think I'd lean towards a revolver for long term storage. The lack of needing magazines would be a big benefit, and in the case of a 357, you'd get a survival gun that could use more than one cartridge.
I agree with this, and the other similar posts. Hard to beat the simplicity, robustness, reliability of a steel revolver. And no magazines is a plus.
After that, I agree with the posts to consider a cheap,used Glock or M&P (not hard to find on sites like Armslist).
 

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A Glock in 9mm or a 686 would fit the bill.

Out a coat of Renaissance Wax on it, and put a small tube of gun oil and 50-100 rounds with it. Holster and some speed loaders or spare mags depending on the gun, and you should be good to go.
 

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Something tells me I ought to take a metal detector with me each time I go hiking in the woods from now on. Never know what I might find. ;)
 

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I figure your only joking but, I don't think I'm the only one who has anti tampering measure's In place on all my stashes. put It this way If you happen across a plastic wrapped entrenching tool about a foot underground STOP and walk away. Just putting that out there.
 

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Rock Island M200. 38 Special, revolver, 4" barrell. $200 new.
 

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I'm just trying to understand your scenario. Is the offsite climate controlled storage, too far away to periodically check on the firearm, and perform any maintenance? If not, then why not just check on the firearm periodically? If it is too far away to do that, how is it less inconvenient than just going to a gun store, and picking something up? The money you'd be spending to store it could be used for an emergency gun fund. It just seems like there's details missing, that would help others understand the situation.
 

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I was confused by the title of the thread, in the DP forum. "Stash gun" doesnt bring me a vision of secured climate controlled storage.
 

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Discussion Starter #53
I'm just trying to understand your scenario. Is the offsite climate controlled storage, too far away to periodically check on the firearm, and perform any maintenance? If not, then why not just check on the firearm periodically? If it is too far away to do that, how is it less inconvenient than just going to a gun store, and picking something up? The money you'd be spending to store it could be used for an emergency gun fund. It just seems like there's details missing, that would help others understand the situation.
it is close enough to check up on, but that's not always how I'll want to spend my time. Looking to mostly ignore it, but still have it in a pinch. that's pretty much my whole DP/prepper mentality. not the biggest part of my life, but just prep work in the background.
 

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"need it in a pinch". Does that mean "need it within 5min", or does that mean "i have no guns and need to get the one i stashed, that is buried 250mi NW in the yellowstone wilderness"
 

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My brother has stored several long and short guns by first liberally spraying them with WD40, then vacu sealing them.
He periodically checks them. So far, after several years they seem to be doing just fine.
But, we don't have much of a humidity problem out here in CA.
 

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My brother has stored several long and short guns by first liberally spraying them with WD40, then vacu sealing them.
He periodically checks them. So far, after several years they seem to be doing just fine.
But, we don't have much of a humidity problem out here in CA.
Vacuum packed in what, a plastic bag? Plastics allow air and water to pass through over time. Or is it perhaps a glass case using silicone gaskets.

If i were to do something like that it would be evacuating the air and then filling with argon to get net pressure of zero.
 

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Vacuum packed in what, a plastic bag? Plastics allow air and water to pass through over time. Or is it perhaps a glass case using silicone gaskets.

If i were to do something like that it would be evacuating the air and then filling with argon to get net pressure of zero.
Vacuum sealed using a "Seal a Meal" system. I'm not saying it's perfect, but it seems to be working so far.
 

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Vacuum sealed using a "Seal a Meal" system. I'm not saying it's perfect, but it seems to be working so far.
With a silica dry pack inside that's an ok solution. However, thise are usually spec'd to be stored on dry shelf.

I just had in my mind that "stashing" for DP was like hiding it in wilderness for when the need arises, so i figured burined in ground.

So, perhaps the food bag w/ silica pack(s), then placed into 5gal bucket, lid with gasket (or siliconed) and then buried. 5gal bucket you can stash a few other items too.
 

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If you store your weapons in a fire proof safe, that should do the job. Off site only beckons the call after one forgets where one puts it. Forgotten many stored items over the years. Of all the things I have lost, I miss my mind the most.
 

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Back in the 80's I had a friend that was a prepper of sorts. He lived in Tucson, and owned a piece of property in Northern Arizona. He bought several AK-47's when they were $89.95 all day long in gun stores. He also bought several thousand rounds of surplus Com-Block ammunition for them.

He then set about locating caches of AK's and ammo around his 40 acre property. He found some sort of large military surplus ammo cans, in which a certain amount of these under folder AK's, magazines, and ammo would fit. He then coated the outside of the cans in roofing tar, and then let them sit. Once the tar had cooled and solidified, he placed the rifle and accessories in the cans. He had covered the rifles and magazines in a heavy oil, and wrapped them in butcher paper. The ammunition he placed in a plastic container inside the cans with the rifles. He then buried these cans in locations around his property.

He has since retired, and moved full time to his Northern Arizona property. Last year he was building a large shop, so he had to dig up one of the boxes. He said he opened up the box, and the rifle, magazines, and ammo were still serviceable. He cleaned the rifle and magazines, and then proceeded to shoot all the ammo without a single failure to fire.

Not bad for a weapon and ammo that have been buried in the ground for 36 years.
 
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