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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In winter I have problems with static electricity on my bench(heated room, very low humidity), causing inconsistent drops of powder (Dillon 650) and erratic reading on my electronic scale (also Dillon). I get around the scale problem by zeroing before each weigh. As for for the reloader, I have wiped the powder reservoir with the static pads one puts in the clothes drier, at the suggestion of others. They do not seem to be very effective for very long, but more than that I cannot stand the smell of them. Has anyone tried attaching grounding wires, or is their some other easy solution?
 

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You might want to try some of the static electricity spray. A buddy uses stuff you find at the grocery store (the name eludes me right now)

He will spray his shotgun hulls so that the powder doesn't stick when it is dumped in the hulls....I'm talking a quick spritz over the bin where they're stored.

A quick search for "static electricity spray" showed up with this. It might be worthwhile.

Other than that, the dryer sheets are always what I've heard of.

Good Luck.

esheato...
 

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I don`t know how you`re set up but could you maybe humidify the room some how? Maybe pick up a room humidifier or a pan of water on a hot plate when you load or something similar? It shouldn`t take much to raise the humidity in the room with the door shut. I think the price of a humidifier or hot plate would be worth it compared to the price of a possible faulty scales or ignition of powder on the bench from a spark.
Here in Michigan the humidity can get real low from the forced air furnace most have, and week + long bouts of sub 20 deg temps take a lot of moisture out of the air. I`ve experianced the problem you have with my measure but never my scales.
I do run a humidifier on the furnace when it gets to feeling dry and it always has helped.
 

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How about an anti-static pad on your work surface. I have one under my PC as I type this. It's about 2' x 3', maybe 1/8" thick, and connected to a small wire that you connect to the center screw on an electrical outlet. Touching the pad causes whatever static electricity buildup there is to discharge into the pad.

Not sure where I got this one, as it's over 10 years old.

Just an idea...
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Fremont--I checked the thread over on battle rifles and noted that it was started by another guy from Lubbock. Unlike him I forgot to mention how much the wind contributes to the static.

Thanks for the other responses. I will try to run down the static spray, but in the meantime I will try grounding the loader.
 

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I'm in Arizona and static can get really bad because of the dry air. I reload in my garage where I am constantly on a concrete floor and have not noticed anything, but once inside the house on the carpet it can get pretty bad sometimes.
I work a lot on open computers and have zapped at least one motherboard because of static.
Here are 2 cheap solutions:

1. A wristband to ground yourself. It works, but I do not like this one very much.

2. Spraying the carpet area slightly with fabric softener - this works wonders. It won't help against powder clinging against the powder measure, but it will help against a situation as mentioned in this other thread.
 

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Try grounding/bonding your press to your home ground. I called Dillon before I did this and they told me lots of folks do it. I used a 1 Megohm resistor. Make sure you scrape/sand the conections from the hopper to the actual bolts on the bench. Check it with a meter for continuity before you ground it. I used an 18Ga wire with a ring terminal on the bottom of my mounting bolts to the neutral/ground for the house. It seems to have helped. The static that builds on the plastic hopper still seems to make flakes of Clays stick to the plastic a little but my throw consitancy is dead solid. I wouldnt do it without a resistor on the minor chance of a surge of some kind.
 
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