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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I love my Para U.S.A. 1911, but it is much harder to field strip and get back together than a striker fired pistol. Why cant they do this ease of assembly for the 1911? I compare my 1911 reassembly to that of the Ruger 22 pistols. I want to say my Para U.S.A pistol is as accurate as my striker fired pistol but at this time I can not say that because they are about the same. The striker fired holds way more rounds I.E. 15+1 and is easy to brake down and reassemble. the 1911 is easy to brake down but its like doing a dance to get it back together. My Para only has 100 rounds through it. Should I get an extended guide rod? Would that help? Guys help me out here because I just want to get this Para to where I can put it up against any striker fired. I know it has to be possible.
 

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How many times have you field stripped your Para? It probably doesn't need it, but have you detail stripped it?
I think when you are used to it field stripping ( and detail stripping) a 1911 becomes second nature and can be done in the dark. I believe the design is so intuitive that once you have become quite proficient with stripping a 1911 that many other pistols will become either easier to strip or make no sense, and either go away or become a staple. Personal taste and mileage WILL vary.
 

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A little more practice and you will be able to field strip your 1911 in no time. I think I can detail strip one in a minute or two.
 

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luv freedom:

The 1911 design (and in this discussion, the LDA's are essentially the same) is now over 100 years old. The disassembly methods for the 5" (i.e., "Government Model") guns is the same for almost all of them....

(Newer short-barreled - primarily - versions are somewhat different, and tend to be a little goofy or even more difficult to strip. I'm going to assume that this is not part of the discussion right now. FWIW, I've got three Tupperguns and four 1911's, two of which are Government Model clones.)

So, you take your trusty bushing wrench (or some serious fingers) and carefully remove the barrel bushing and recoil spring. Some full-length guide rod guns want you to stick a screwdriver in the muzzle end and back out part of the guide rod before trying to remove the bushing.

Then, help the slide back to the point where the disassembly cutout lines up with the slide stop. Using a convenient tool, your fingers, or a bullet tip, gently press the slide stop out of the gun.

At this point, you can remove the slide by just drawing it forward and off the frame.

The barrel, recoil spring, and guide rod (or parts of it) are now in the slide, and loose.

The Tupperguns generally involve a lever (S&W's M&P's, and Springfield XD's) or some slide-switch like projections that are used to disengage the silde from the frame. In some cases, the striker assembly needs to be disengaged from the sear - pulling the trigger, or with a lever of some kind. The slide should come off, leaving the barrel and spring still in the slide for fairly easy removal.

By now, both types of guns are about as pulled apart as is sensible for normal cleaning. The Tupperguns I've played with require various punches and other specific tools to further disassemble them. The manufacturers generally suggest that you don't do that.

The 1911, OTOH, while further disassembly is not recommended, were designed to be disassemble without tools. The thumb safety can be used to remove assorted pins, and in some cases they may be used to remove other pins. Pretty much everything else falls out without tools. I do it once in a while for deep cleaning.

So, where are we? If you just want to clean your 1911 v.s. your Tuppergun, there's not a heck of a lot of difference. It's just different. It also presumes some instruction, which is available just about anywhere.

The Tupperguns are also generally "no tools", and it appears were usually designed to be a little easier to take apart, but how they work is a little closer to magic :D. IF you only want to clean them....

Regards,
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I am 100% sure it is me and I need more practice Thanks guys just kinda frustrating when use to the striker fired type gun.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I am taking it out before. The problem im having is reassembly. When I go to put the slide back on it seems like everything has to be just perfect or I cant get the slide stop pin in. The slide acts like it keeps hitting something and then that throws the barrel out of place and then I have to restart. I have gotten it back together in as little as 30 seconds but most of the time it takes a lot up and down and rotating and just plain getting lucky before I can get it in to position to insert the slide stop pin and then the barrel lug.
 

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I have a Glock 17 and a Ruger SR1911. It is true the striker fired Glock is super easy to field strip, once you get the hang of the stock short slide lock lever, but the 1911 while it takes a little longer is also fairly easy to field strip. Now reassembly without producing the dreaded "idiot mark" takes a few tries but after you do it a dozen times its not hard.
 

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I am taking it out before. The problem im having is reassembly. When I go to put the slide back on it seems like everything has to be just perfect or I cant get the slide stop pin in. The slide acts like it keeps hitting something and then that throws the barrel out of place and then I have to restart. I have gotten it back together in as little as 30 seconds but most of the time it takes a lot up and down and rotating and just plain getting lucky before I can get it in to position to insert the slide stop pin and then the barrel lug.
Ok, just checking. I thought that's what you were getting at, trouble with re-assembly. Some slide stops go in easier than others, there are a few factors that make that the case. I've owned well over a dozen 1911's, some slide stops have gone in very easy and others were/ are much tougher. There is a little mod you can make to the slide stop to get it to slide past the detent easier. I'll have to search for a proper thread for you.
 

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IMO guide rod length on a full length or commander length gun makes no difference in ease of field stripping. On a bull barrel gun it is a different story though depending on how the recoil spring and guide rod are designed and fit. I have had bull barrel 1911's that I could do without any additional tools and one I could not. YMMV
 

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How many times have you field stripped your Para? It probably doesn't need it, but have you detail stripped it?
I think when you are used to it field stripping ( and detail stripping) a 1911 becomes second nature and can be done in the dark. I believe the design is so intuitive that once you have become quite proficient with stripping a 1911 that many other pistols will become either easier to strip or make no sense, and either go away or become a staple. Personal taste and mileage WILL vary.
This is literally true that it can be field stripped with your eyes closed. I've done it! Thousand of soldiers, Marines and sailors have done it, perhaps millions. As for capacity, 14+1 is only 1 round down from the striker fired pistol. Hardly an important difference.
Just have to get used to it.
 

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Just part of owning a 1911. Do it enough and you should be able to field strip & reassemble a 1911 with your eyes closed. Seriously.
 

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I must be odd. A 1911 and a Glock come apart just as easily. Want a challenge? Try remembering how the sear cage on a CZ or clone goes back together your first time.
 

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Well, so far my Sig P220 is the easiest I've tried for field strip (Pretty much applies to all the Sig Classic P series) I'm down to about 2 minutes to clean after a range session. The 1911 has a few more steps and stuff like taking the recoil spring out and lining up the slide stop can be a little challenging some days but I can probably do a quick clean after a range session in about 5 minutes now. Both of which are tool less field strips (I guess you could use the bushing wrench but I never do)

I wouldn't say the 1911 is difficult but I definitely notice a speed improvement now over the first couple of times trying it. Do it a few dozen more times, it gets easier...

-Jim
 

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The slide acts like it keeps hitting something and then that throws the barrel out of place and then I have to restart.
You holding it upside down when putting the slide on? I've seen a few videos showing the upside down reassembly. I know the plunger bar comes out when you do it upside down and you need to just hold it in to get the slide to go on...
-Jim
 
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