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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just wanted to throw this out there and get some feedback on what you all do to try and combat condensation on guns? What is happening is, I keep my guns indoors in an air conditioned home, like I assume most of us do. Where I live, it's common to have 80%+ humidity every day during the spring and summer months.

Anytime I want to take a gun outside the house, the condensation literally pours off of them. Keeping them in safe helps somewhat, but there's a few I keep out for ease of access. 60 seconds after stepping outside it's like you soaked it with the water hose. Forget about trying to use a scope, they stay fogged up for 20-30min before you can even think about using it.

This is no good, I can't have my guns sweating like a toilet tank every time I need to take it out of the house. I've all but turned the AC off in my house. There has to be a compromise here. I have one pelican case that does a pretty good job, but still the rifle in it sweats when taken outside, just not as bad as the guns I try to keep handy.

Anyone got any tips for this? Short of turning my AC off or storing my guns outside on the porch? I'm thinking there must be some solutions out there I just wanted to throw this out there and see what you all do? I'm surely not the only one that has dealt with this scenario...
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'm curious if installing a dehumidifier in my ductwork for the central AC may help? I am going to pick up a room dehumidifier for my bedroom and give that a try. This condensation is seriously cramping my style...
 

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Unfortunately, it is the fact that they are so cold and the outdoors is hot and humid, that is causing the problem. You must keep one chilly house. 😀

Photographers have the same problem, in reverse. They use their cameras outdoors in the winter in very cold climates and have to protect their expensive equipment when they walk inside a building. They do this by putting the equipment in a zip lock bag, squeezing out as much air as possible before sealing it, and then carrying it inside. They leave it in the bag until the equipment warms up to room temp and condensation forms on the outside of the bag. After it warms up, they take it out of the bag.

Obviously that isn't a convenient solution for you carrying your gun from a really cold house out into a warm and super humid outdoors.

The only solution is to find a way to keep the guns you want to carry outdoors warmer while they are indoors. This is the only way to keep the cold metal from causing all the humidity in the air outside from condensing on the gun when you go outside.
 

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Dew point issue. My glasses do that until they reach a temperature above the dew point. You may try to warm up the gun before you take them outdoors. The dew point is where the moisture in the warm hot air hits a cold object, like a piece of cold metal or glass and water droplets condenses on it. It happens to my camera lenses as well. You could ask an air conditioner person about your options. Some people have their home over air conditioned too cold when you could change the cycling a bit, drop the humidity and raise the temperature, the air conditioning people refer it as the comfort zone.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Unfortunately, it is the fact that they are so cold and the outdoors is hot and humid, that is causing the problem. You must keep one chilly house. 😀

Photographers have the same problem, in reverse. They use their cameras outdoors in the winter in very cold climates and have to protect their expensive equipment when they walk inside a building. They do this by putting the equipment in a zip lock bag, squeezing out as much air as possible before sealing it, and then carrying it inside. They leave it in the bag until the equipment warms up to room temp and condensation forms on the outside of the bag. After it warms up, they take it out of the bag.

Obviously that isn't a convenient solution for you carrying your gun from a really cold house out into a warm and super humid outdoors.

The only solution is to find a way to keep the guns you want to carry outdoors warmer while they are indoors. This is the only way to keep the cold metal from causing all the humidity in the air outside from condensing on the gun when you go outside.
I've got my t-stat on 76degF for the last week or so trying to reduce this. I live in WV and right now the humidity is 86%. That's a pretty good average humidity, it's just muggy all the time during the summer. But even at 76degF, my guns still sweat. Same with optics, flashlights, etc.

I'm thinking that keeping the guns in something like a Pelican/Hardigg case that is air tight may help keep the indoor air temp from affecting the gun temp so much. I'm also thinking maybe a dehumidifier may help? Hoping someone on here knows more about HVAC than I do, lol...
 

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I've got my t-stat on 76degF for the last week or so trying to reduce this. I live in WV and right now the humidity is 86%. That's a pretty good average humidity, it's just muggy all the time during the summer. But even at 76degF, my guns still sweat. Same with optics, flashlights, etc.

I'm thinking that keeping the guns in something like a Pelican/Hardigg case that is air tight may help keep the indoor air temp from affecting the gun temp so much. I'm also thinking maybe a dehumidifier may help? Hoping someone on here knows more about HVAC than I do, lol...
One of those cases might help. They should insulate them from the colder temperatures in you house.

A dehumidifier won't help. It isn't moisture in your home that makes them wet when you carry them outside. It is the moisture in the air outside. It's just the cold metal comes in contact with the moist air outside and the humidity starts condensing from the outside air onto the gun. Like taking a warm, empty, dry tea glass outside, put ice and tea in it, and as the glass gets cold, water starts condensing on the outside.
 

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Anyone got any tips for this?
Carry IWB and get, dressed 15-20 minutes before you leave the house. THe gun will slowly come up to near body temp and will not sweat upon leaving the house.

Rifles- My scope fogs too- but it you can clear the door and get a shot off inside about 6-8 seconds, you're ok. (the remaining coyotes hate me!)

I keep a silicon gun rage inside the door of the safe so that I can wipe em' down upon putting them away.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
One of those cases might help. They should insulate them from the colder temperatures in you house.

A dehumidifier won't help. It isn't moisture in your home that makes them wet when you carry them outside. It is the moisture in the air outside. It's just the cold metal comes in contact with the moist air outside and the humidity starts condensing from the outside air onto the gun. Like taking a warm, empty, dry tea glass outside, put ice and tea in it, and as the glass gets cold, water starts condensing on the outside.
Well my thinking with the dehumidifier is that I can possibly run a higher a temperature inside the house and not have the guns so cool. As PolymerMan mentioned, lowering the humidity inside the house should allow me to run a higher temperature and not be miserable and getting griped at by my wife, etc.

I suppose my question is, how to insulate the gun/s from the indoor temperature to decrease the difference between the indoor/outdoor temp and decrease condensation. I'm just looking for any little thing I can do to help at this point...

Crookeds, I haven't heard of the golden rod before. That's a good idea, I'm looking into it as we speak.

Flechero, coyotes are the major reason that I'm griping over this. I have a infestation of them at the moment. Lately I've been sitting my coyote rig outside to sweat it out before dark. Take it down, lube everything and go from there. Its not as bad as I'm making it out to be probably. But it's irritating and I was thinking maybe I can try to find multiple ways to combat this? The optic fogging up is the big downer, anything I use for HD during the summer wears iron sights because of this.

Thinking of putting scopecoats on my optics to help insulate. Inside a sealed type case and find a way to increase indoor temperature without making the house overly hot. I work in a steel fab shop most days when I'm not in the field baking in the sun. So I can deal with the heat to a point, but don't overly enjoy it when I'm not at work, lol...
 

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I don't have such extreme humidity but I do live within a block of the ocean. My carry gun lives outside the safe and is either on me or on the nightstand. That gun gets wiped down with a silicone cloth pretty regularly. The rest of the guns live in Bore Stores and get a generous coat of Renaissance Wax before they go in the safe. In the safe they live with a golden rod and a very large can of desiccant that gets refreshed as needed.

I think if I was dealing with temp/humidity extremes I'd go with Ren Wax, put them on before I went outside so they warm up a bit, and then give them a wipe down to get the condensation off once they were outside. I realize that's not very convenient. Keeping them in bore stores might might also help insulate them from such a large temp fluctuation. Might be worth trying on a gun or two to see how it works.
 

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Well my thinking with the dehumidifier is that I can possibly run a higher a temperature inside the house and not have the guns so cool. As PolymerMan mentioned, lowering the humidity inside the house should allow me to run a higher temperature and not be miserable and getting griped at by my wife, etc.

I suppose my question is, how to insulate the gun/s from the indoor temperature to decrease the difference between the indoor/outdoor temp and decrease condensation. I'm just looking for any little thing I can do to help at this point...

Crookeds, I haven't heard of the golden rod before. That's a good idea, I'm looking into it as we speak.

Flechero, coyotes are the major reason that I'm griping over this. I have a infestation of them at the moment. Lately I've been sitting my coyote rig outside to sweat it out before dark. Take it down, lube everything and go from there. Its not as bad as I'm making it out to be probably. But it's irritating and I was thinking maybe I can try to find multiple ways to combat this? The optic fogging up is the big downer, anything I use for HD during the summer wears iron sights because of this.

Thinking of putting scopecoats on my optics to help insulate. Inside a sealed type case and find a way to increase indoor temperature without making the house overly hot. I work in a steel fab shop most days when I'm not in the field baking in the sun. So I can deal with the heat to a point, but don't overly enjoy it when I'm not at work, lol...
Got ya!
The Goldenrod is great. I live in Huntsville, Al. And it gets pretty humid here at times. Not as bad as you are dealing with. But I was using two large rechargeable desiccant packs in my safe and I had to recharge them (dry them out) every week. I bought the 36" Goldenrod and have never had to recharge those desiccant packs since.
 

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For all the complaining about the perpetually-wet PNW weather, the truth is the climate here is very mild and we almost never have to deal with that sort of humidity. I don't have AC as simply opening the windows and cranking up the fans is more than sufficient all but a few days of the year. As a result I never have to worry about condensation or rust on my firearms as long as I remember to give them their bi-annual cleaning and oiling.
 
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Talk to an air conditioning specialist. Find a source for large bags of dessicant. I have found that they are in the shipping boxes for TVs and large appliances. I've never used a Goldenrod, just dessicant, and never had rust on anything in the safe or gun cases.
 

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I live in Houston and deal with the same issue with humidity. I just field strip and apply a clean coat of oil to my carry guns once a month. No rust as of yet. Once a year I’ll shoot the carry ammo and load fresh rounds but due to current ammo situation I haven’t done that yet. Sometimes I’ll get the condensation after getting out of the truck.
 

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Just wanted to throw this out there and get some feedback on what you all do to try and combat condensation on guns? What is happening is, I keep my guns indoors in an air conditioned home, like I assume most of us do. Where I live, it's common to have 80%+ humidity every day during the spring and summer months.

Anytime I want to take a gun outside the house, the condensation literally pours off of them. Keeping them in safe helps somewhat, but there's a few I keep out for ease of access. 60 seconds after stepping outside it's like you soaked it with the water hose. Forget about trying to use a scope, they stay fogged up for 20-30min before you can even think about using it.

This is no good, I can't have my guns sweating like a toilet tank every time I need to take it out of the house. I've all but turned the AC off in my house. There has to be a compromise here. I have one pelican case that does a pretty good job, but still the rifle in it sweats when taken outside, just not as bad as the guns I try to keep handy.

Anyone got any tips for this? Short of turning my AC off or storing my guns outside on the porch? I'm thinking there must be some solutions out there I just wanted to throw this out there and see what you all do? I'm surely not the only one that has dealt with this scenario...
How about putting a gun in a Ziploc bag and set it in a pot of hot tap water while you get ready to go out. This might warm it up sufficiently so that water does not condensate on it when you go outside. Clip the bag to the edge of the pan so the zipper slide does not get submerged.
It’s called sous vide.


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Sounds like you’re storing guns in foam lined cases. If you are, that’s not a good practice. If not, good.

This stuff is a good metal preservative. Try spraying this stuff on your stored guns and leaving them in plastic bags in their cases.



Cases trap in moisture. Humidity will absorb right into the padding.
 

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Don’t adjust your AC, you gotta be comfortable! Anything you do to raise the temperature of the gun to closely match the outside temperature will help, whether you use body heat or heating pad or hair dryer or whatever. If I’m going to the range, I just set my range bag (with pistol inside bag) in my enclosed garage an hour or so before I leave. The bag protects the gun as it slowly warms up. On the way to the range, my bag is in the back of the SUV, not up front by the AC ducts. If concealed carry, getting dressed ahead of time should warm the gun.
 

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Flechero, coyotes are the major reason that I'm griping over this. I have a infestation of them at the moment.
If you are hunting them, you can set the gun out early... but if you are opportunity shooting them as they run through a pasture, you can't predict that. I fight the same thing and don't have a good answer to it. My bride keeps the AC on 70-72, (I'm in Central Texas) so I know exactly what you are talking about and the gun can literally drip with sweat on humid days.

When I hunt, I set the gun out, inside a case, so it warms slowly. This solves any sweat issues on planned hunts. However, most of my coyote shots are a quick step out the back door, shooting before or as it fogs.

I'll be watching this one for more ideas... I hope someone can provide a better answer.
 
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