1911Forum banner

Sundance Kid Syndrome

1497 Views 5 Replies 5 Participants Last post by  gtf
OK heres the problem. Remember in Butch Casidy and the Sundance Kid when the old guy asked sundance to shoot and he couldnt hit the broad side of a barn. THen he said he had to move and then was taking the wings off flies at 20 yards. I am experiencing something similer. Slow fire high concentration on a HK international training division target, bad guy picture, I'm all over the place. When I shoot fast and on the move like charging the target like a room entry scenario, I'm consistantly putting a 3 inch, two to the chest and one right between the eyes! How the hell am I getting an accurate shot while moving and going fast but sucking wind when concentrating and going slow?! Shot anticipation maybe??? Any suggestions are greatly appreciated.

------------------
George Orwell: "That rifle on the wall of the labourer's cottage or working class flat is the symbol of democracy. It is our job to see that it stays there."
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
118 Posts
Weird,

I'm sort of the same way. I went to my first Action Pistol match last Saturday and shot even better than I did shooting from one spot on a regular range. I only missed the "hit zone" twice on two stages and I'm missing by 1-2 inches at most. All my head shots were hitting the hit zone (about 2"X5" rectangle) from about 10 yards. Granted it's not a timed event, but it's still under pressure + shooting from different positions + tactical reloads and I shot better than I do in a normal range.

------------------
~ ScorpioVI
http://tacticalpursuits.com
 

· Registered
Joined
·
715 Posts
I shoot better in a Yaqui shoot - which calls for a certain amount of movement - than I shoot at a target. I'm not sure why.

(A long time ago, I had a fictionalized book on Robin Hood. One of his Merry Men took too long aiming and missed a shot. Robin said, "Overcare spilleth the milk." Maybe that's it.)

------------------
If God didn't want us to own guns, why did He make the 1911?
 

· Registered
Joined
·
252 Posts
I`m the very same way, i am always better at rapid fire defensive shooting than having all the time in the world.. If i have time to think about it, to many things creep in my mind.. I`m actually glad i`m this way, i wouldn`t want it the other way around.. Don`t think about it, just do it.. -Gilmore

------------------
ME,WE!
 

· Registered
Joined
·
112 Posts
What exactly is the problem? It seems that feeling confident about one's ability to effectively engage while under pressure or movement would be a good thing.


And I'm not sure I agree with your analogy. Sundance did not need to "move" like you or the other posters are talking about. He just had to shoot like he practiced: by bending his knees and shooting from the hip. I don't remember any actual movement.

But I agree that this appears to be an instinct vs. brain phenomenon. When moving, you don't allow yourself the luxury of over-thinking the shot, rather you simply allow yourself to shoot instinctively. Perhaps the answer is to use the same mental technique in your normal practice--by not allowing yourself to overanalyze your target or your shot.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top