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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I couldn't shoot my old glock very well so I sold it and got a 1911. I can't shoot the 1911 very well either. I'm a military officer and can shoot good with an m9 though which puzzles me. Without buying a book, is there something out there that gives pistol shooting techniques/tips? Thanks
 

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Hate to tell you, but...

If you base your shooting ability on the standard 240 point course everybody on this board is an expert. If you do the watchstander qualification (that might be Navy only) it's even worse. The best thing you can do is get some basic instruction from a pro or a good book written by one of the recognized masters of the "modern technique". Over the net instruction would be hard to do without illustrations or personal correction.
 

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I would think that as long as you have the basic understandings of marksmanship, grip, breathing, sight alignment, trigger control and so on.....the rest is practice practice and more practice. The basics will get you on target and proficient(sp?) with your weapon, unless your going for bullseye style shooting, and thats a different gig. But for a good qual on the range, the basics have always gotten me an "E". FWIW
 

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cobranx said:
I can't shoot the 1911 very well either. I'm a military officer and can shoot good with an m9 though which puzzles me.
Puzzles me a little too. You are not the only soldier I've heard from that can shoot the m9 better than some other weapons. It has an obvious sight picture and a relatively long sight radius. It is also very front heavy. (It is actually quite heavy for what it is in any case). I have found that it really helps to have friends that I can trust that can shoot much better than I. I like to go with them to the range and get them to critique one thing each time. One of the most common errors with a new gun is to shoot a box of 50 rounds and decide whether you are any good with that gun or not. Not good. Shoot 200 rounds and note any changes in sight picture, POA vs POI. If it improves somewhat from where you stand, come back a day or so later and do it again. Still improving? When the rate of improvement begins to slow, engage expert friends for the finishing touches. (I still have some of the friends, we're all older and smarter now though). :p
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
stillwater said:
Puzzles me a little too. You are not the only soldier I've heard from that can shoot the m9 better than some other weapons. It has an obvious sight picture and a relatively long sight radius. It is also very front heavy. (It is actually quite heavy for what it is in any case). I have found that it really helps to have friends that I can trust that can shoot much better than I. I like to go with them to the range and get them to critique one thing each time. One of the most common errors with a new gun is to shoot a box of 50 rounds and decide whether you are any good with that gun or not. Not good. Shoot 200 rounds and note any changes in sight picture, POA vs POI. If it improves somewhat from where you stand, come back a day or so later and do it again. Still improving? When the rate of improvement begins to slow, engage expert friends for the finishing touches. (I still have some of the friends, we're all older and smarter now though). :p
on the 9 mil qual range, I am dead center mass of the target and I usually always hit dead center.....the first double action shot throws me every now and then
 

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Could be that your pistol is not mechanically capable of the accuracy you are looking for (not likely, but possible). Could be that your pistol, while mechanically accurate, is not shooter friendly, and could have a heavy SA trigger pul (very likely)l. Perhapse you are recoil sensitive (I am at times)? Perhapse your ammo is of poor quality (possible, depends on what you considder a bad group)?
In other words there could be lots of reasons why you are not shooting well, but my WAG would be you are having a problem with trigger control. One way to test my theory is to shoot the gun from a rest. When rested on a bag, you can concentrate more on trigger control. Try a few dry fires from a rest and watch whether the muzzle dips or the sights jump off target.
I have always liked the SA pull on most of the M9s I have fired. Could be your 1911 has a poor trigger, and the heavier recoil could be causing you to jerk.
It usually takes me a period of time to get used to a new gun, so don't panic.
On that note, try a little dry fire practice.
 

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cobranx,have you shot alot of different handguns?
a Hi-Power 9mm? that gun shoots 17 rds of 9mm
and is dead on from first to last shot, I can't shoot
a M-9 worth a crap, it is too bulky muzzle heavy
I shoot the 1911 .45 pretty good, and Glocks are
crap too.I do my best shooting with a .357 revolver.
I wonder what your idea of" can't shoot the 1911 very
well either."your quote"
 

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cobranx said:
I couldn't shoot my old glock very well so I sold it and got a 1911. I can't shoot the 1911 very well either. I'm a military officer and can shoot good with an m9 though which puzzles me. Without buying a book, is there something out there that gives pistol shooting techniques/tips? Thanks

Saying you cannot shoot is a very very open statement. Can you tell us how you stand, how you hold the gun, and where you hit on the target? (would not shock me if you said right handed and low and left) Heck, if you live close to Woodbridge Virginia I would be happy to teach you.

Oh, and what caliber were the other guns? Can you post a 7 yd or 10 yd target picture?
 
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