1911Forum banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I was looking at getting a .357 and came across one that offered porting. Not wanting to stay in the dark I decided to ask the good folks here what porting is in regards to a revolver.

The model I'm looking at is the Taurus 608, the 8 shot .357. Anyone have any feed-back on it?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,492 Posts
Uncle Buck said:
I was looking at getting a .357 and came across one that offered porting. Not wanting to stay in the dark I decided to ask the good folks here what porting is in regards to a revolver.

The model I'm looking at is the Taurus 608, the 8 shot .357. Anyone have any feed-back on it?
Uncle Buck,

For 357's porting does indeed help/work. I have two revolvers that are ported, ones a Taurus 605 357 magnum that factory ported. You can shoot the most punishing cartridge round and it'll tame the recoil down allot. Be aware the alothough the recoil is reduced the ports redirect sound waves so you'll get a louder bang!

rimfire,22
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the insight. I'm looking at getting a Taurus because of the negative things I've read about S&W's locking system. Is the Taurus's safety system prone to malfuntioning?

I'm looking at getting a HD gun and am a bit concerned with the flash and additional sound indoors. The model .357 I'm looking for will have to include 7 rd or better capacity, 4 inch barrel semi or fully shrouded, and in stainless steel. With those listed features what model Taurus would ya'll recommend.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
64 Posts
Buck,

I have the 608, 6.5 barrel with the ports. They do work. I did notice that the muzzle flip was really controlled as well. I am glad I bought it. The only problem with the gun I have is the grips. A little then for my meat hook hands. I will replace them once I find some beefier ones.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,492 Posts
what ever floats your boat

Uncle Buck said:
Thanks for the insight. I'm looking at getting a Taurus because of the negative things I've read about S&W's locking system. Is the Taurus's safety system prone to malfuntioning?

I'm looking at getting a HD gun and am a bit concerned with the flash and additional sound indoors. The model .357 I'm looking for will have to include 7 rd or better capacity, 4 inch barrel semi or fully shrouded, and in stainless steel. With those listed features what model Taurus would ya'll recommend.

Uncle Buk,

None of my S & W's nor any Taurus revolvers has given me any problems what so ever. I can only assume anybody can make a lemon now and then. Just keep it clean and it'll take care of you. I suggest books for reference to help you along.

If you shoot indoors allot I wouldn't worry about the additional sound caused by the porting. This is because you have ear muffs. Since now a days muzzle flash is not much of a concern I'd go ahead and try some porting. You never know until one tries.

The type of revolver you may want I can't say cuz I usually favor short barreled revolvers. If you want a 4" heavy barrel then that considered an inductry standard. Guards usually get 4" barrels cuz it offers a good over-all usage revolver. If you can get stainless steel then that what I recommend. Blue os fine but you have to keep an oily rag with you so corrosion won't set-in. Their's nothing wrong with standard blue.

Keep the faith

rimfire,22
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
628 Posts
Tell me about porting...
....Loud, dirty, and bright in subdued lighting. A very poor choice for home defence. IMO when you weigh the advantages over the disadvantages you would be better off going to a lesser chambering that you can controll without ports.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,492 Posts
Uncle Buck said:
Any opinions on the Taurus 66?
If you had a pic of it then cosmetically it might look like a Smith model 66 with a 4 " barrel. It might be just what you need/want. Opinions opinions opinions..... everybody has them. It all up to you. Indeed it isn't really necessary unless you have money to spare. Porting does work so if you have the money go for it. Othrwise you have to out weigh what you want compared to your pocket book be it house gun or for field usage.

rimfire,22
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
997 Posts
Uncle Buck said:
Thanks for the insight. I'm looking at getting a Taurus because of the negative things I've read about S&W's locking system. Is the Taurus's safety system prone to malfuntioning?

I'm looking at getting a HD gun and am a bit concerned with the flash and additional sound indoors. The model .357 I'm looking for will have to include 7 rd or better capacity, 4 inch barrel semi or fully shrouded, and in stainless steel. With those listed features what model Taurus would ya'll recommend.
I think in almost all instances a Taurus is a cheap copy of a S&W . On close inspection the Smith is worlds ahead . Ahead again if you consider Taurus' bad rep for customer service and Smith's stellar industry leading service . Smith even pays shipping . Not that I EVER needed service on a S&W. The only reason to buy a Taurus is to save a few bucks , and in the long run the Smith is a much better investment.

The main thing porting does , whether for a shotgun , a rifle , or a pistol , is to reduce perceived recoil by reducing muzzle jump . Gases are directed somewhere else other than back down the barrel . This results in increased noise and flash at the muzzle which is a negative in a combat situation , indoors , or anywhere at night . If you are shooting with earplugs outside in daylight it might be very pleasant , but in a darkened bedroom with full house .357 loads you will be both deaf and blind for a few seconds ! Porting CAN make a violently nasty recoiling pistol manageable for those that couldn't handle it otherwise though...Tom
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,572 Posts
While not revolvers, I have several semi auto's that are ported. One of mine I have a ported barrel and a standard barrel. I have switched them on the range to see the difference. It is shocking how much recoil out of a 10mm or a 40 S&W a good porting or even a good comp can soak up. Never underestimate how much recoil a good port job will do on a high pressure cartraige.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,492 Posts
Peter M. Eick said:
While not revolvers, I have several semi auto's that are ported. One of mine I have a ported barrel and a standard barrel. I have switched them on the range to see the difference. It is shocking how much recoil out of a 10mm or a 40 S&W a good porting or even a good comp can soak up. Never underestimate how much recoil a good port job will do on a high pressure cartraige.

Peter,

I totally agree with you on the subject. For those that are torn between trying it out or not my only advice is to go for it only if one has the money. In reality porting isn't really necessary but for myself the only way to find out is to try it. For 357 fans porting is well worth good spent money. Just be aware of it's possible plusses and minuses.

rimfire,22
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,200 Posts
Don't "just do it" on your own gun. Borrow a gun that's already ported and try it out first. You can't go back, and if you ruin a favorite gun, you won't be a happy camper.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,492 Posts
tpdtom said:
I think in almost all instances a Taurus is a cheap copy of a S&W . On close inspection the Smith is worlds ahead . Ahead again if you consider Taurus' bad rep for customer service and Smith's stellar industry leading service . Smith even pays shipping . Not that I EVER needed service on a S&W. The only reason to buy a Taurus is to save a few bucks , and in the long run the Smith is a much better investment.

The main thing porting does , whether for a shotgun , a rifle , or a pistol , is to reduce perceived recoil by reducing muzzle jump . Gases are directed somewhere else other than back down the barrel . This results in increased noise and flash at the muzzle which is a negative in a combat situation , indoors , or anywhere at night . If you are shooting with earplugs outside in daylight it might be very pleasant , but in a darkened bedroom with full house .357 loads you will be both deaf and blind for a few seconds ! Porting CAN make a violently nasty recoiling pistol manageable for those that couldn't handle it otherwise though...Tom

Tom,

I agree with you regarding to a certain extent Smiths compared to Taurus revolvers and such. Now a days each company employees the same equipment and modern techniques. They both use MIM parts for the lockwork so to compare them as apples and oranges is a moote point. Besides Taurus's prices are just as expensive as Smiths. NONE of any of my Taurus revolvers/pistol have ever failed.

rimfire,22
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
I have checked online and have noticed that the prices for a S&W revolver are always higher than for a Taurus. The S&W model seven shot .357, the 620, goes for around $470+. The price for the same type of revolver from Taurus, the model 66, goes for $320+. I'm seriously leaning toward the Taurus just because of the price difference.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,492 Posts
Uncle Buck said:
I have checked online and have noticed that the prices for a S&W revolver are always higher than for a Taurus. The S&W model seven shot .357, the 620, goes for around $470+. The price for the same type of revolver from Taurus, the model 66, goes for $320+. I'm seriously leaning toward the Taurus just because of the price difference.

Uncle Buck,

Personally you can't go wrong with a Smith. However don't discount the Taurus revolvers. They're made well just like the Smiths using the same materials and modern machinery as everyone does. My house gun is a Taurus revolver stoked with the same ammo that'll fit the Smith. Besides does Smith have a lifetime warranty? Noooo....... but I'm sure Smith will fix if the part is defective. Taurus will fix no questions asked if left untouched. My two cents only.

Anyway getting back to your original question. If you have the money go ahead and get yours ported. Again I only paid about 100 bucks from "Mag Na Port" and it does work for a extremly slight loss in velocity. Is it necessary for your needs? I can't answer that but if it doesn't work out for you it can only enhanse it possible resale value. That's under the assumption you really don't like it. It won't ruin your barrel. If it were mine I'd wouldn't evwen consider reselling it anyway. Good luck in your final decision. Be strong!

rimfire,22
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
361 Posts
Porting. An interesting topic, to be sure. First of all, let's talk about the different porting methods that are out there. We all have heard about Mag-Na-Port - they're one of the first to be really popular for all kinds of firearms. Their trapezoidal ports are proprietary, and I've heard all kinds of good things about them. Then there is Aro-Tek, which is very popular with the Glock crowd - but I have seen this system on other pistols and revolvers, too. If I remember correctly, the ports were "advanced engineered to duplicate the performance of rocket nozzles" or some such. I think the designer (a rocket scientist, prolly) actually claimed an increase in muzzle velocity from this design! This method requires extensive modification to the barrel and slide of pistols. I have shot a revolver with this system and it does indeed keep the muzzle down, but the flash is pretty intense. The series of ports on top of the barrel light up one by one and nearly wipe out the sight picture. Then we have the old-fashioned way of just drilling holes on the top of or on each side of the barrel of firearms. I have seen holes in shotgun barrels that were indexed about 20 degrees off the vertical axis, and they actually seemed to work pretty good. Most of the big names in revolvers now offer revolvers with an expansion chamber that incorporate ports at the top, and they work good, also. The IPSC folks have been shooting pistols for a long time with all kinds of exotic porting systems. I have a TZ75 with a three chamber compensator on it that shoots very good and very fast, with almost no muzzle jump at all. Now, is this because of the ports or because of the added weight at the end of the barrel? Dunno. All I know for sure is that something's helping to keep the sights on target. It's interesting that you mention being "in the dark" on this subject, because that's where the negatives come in concerning porting. If you had any night vision before you shoot a ported revovler, you'll definitely be temporarily blinded by the flash that ports produce. Even if you use the low-flash ammo, you will be significantly hampered. Anyway, I think Shootcraps has the best suggestion: shoot a ported revolver to see if you like it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
89 Posts
One thing that has not been mentioned is that when a barrel is ported , the effective length of the barrel is shortened to the point of where the porting holes start. Bullet performance from velocity out of the barrel depends on barrel length. This will not affect longer barrel pistols as much as it will short barrels. If this pistol is to be used for punching holes in paper targets then porting is fine, if you can stand the extra flash. If this pistol will be used for self defense, I would get a professional opinion there Uncle Buck, which mine is not. Porting is for competition or big game pistols only. JMHO.
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top