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Discussion Starter #1
Always liked the old Victory Models and the British guns. Can someone give me the low down on the Model 10?
I see lots of 10-5's and 10-7's.
I figure a shrouded barrel means it's newer...but they've been making these for over 100 years so how new is newer?

If I found one for say, $200 in decent shape with the usual wear what can I expect? Age, condition, wear, mechanical condition, etc?

Basically explain the Model 10 to me as it exists in the mainstream of the used handguns market typified by your local pawn shop, gun shop's used handguns showcase, or www.Gun-Broker.com .
 

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Discussion Starter #3
There is a LOT of info on Model 10s over at smith-wessonforum.com .
Won't let me join because I use Yahoo mail.:barf:
 

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I bought my first S&W revolver over thirty years ago, but just bought my first Model 10-7 M&P 5" a few months ago. It was made in the late 70's, and was LNIB so I bought it for $400 + tax. I think that may have been a little high, but it was worth it to me.

The M&P was S&W's basic police revolver... nothing fancy, but it was good enough to do the job. While I like my 1911A1, I would not feel uncomfortable carrying my M&P.

There is a lot of talk about "pinned and recessed". This means the barrel is pinned in place and the cylinder has recessed chambers (the case head is not visible when loaded). To the best of my knowledge, only the magnum revolvers had this feature (and I have never seen a Model 10 M&P with recessed chambers, as Model 10's were .38 S&W Special cartridge). S&W eliminated both these features in the early 80's (I believe) as a cost-cutting measure.

There are a lot of variations of S&W revolvers, so just about anything is liable to turn up as an exception to the rule.

In no way do I consider myself a S&W expert so, 1911forum members, feel free to correct or add to this info.
 

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The model 10 was the 1st hand gun that I purchased. One of the most comfortable revolvers I have ever shot. Been kicking my self for selling it.
 

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Model 10s are wonderful guns. They have everything you need and nothing you don't. They've come in several configurations, the early models with the pencil barrels and the newer guns with the heavier bull style barrels. If you're looking for a basic go to gun, the model 10 in .38 SPL is a good choice. Around here, a good one goes for between $250 and $350.:)
 

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My dad is starting to slow down a little these days (after all he just turned 80) and has been giving me his guns one by one lately. His "Property of the U.S. Navy" stamped Victory Model 10 will probably be next. It was the first handgun I ever shot.
 

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The model 10 came in numerous barrel lengths, pencil barrels, bull barrels...it's hard to say "give me info" without getting a book =). Nowadays, if you can pick one up for $200, jump on it. In my neckof the woods anyway, prices of these have been climbing the past couple of years. Just a couple years ago $200 would have been common, now $350-$400 is more likely. I have two 2" RB (oh, the model 10's can be had in round butt or square butt versions, to further muddy the waters) model 10's from 1967, both very accurate--the one in particular can keep up with my 1911's no problems. They tend to have very nice, smooth triggers. I also have a 4" HB version. They can eat +P's all day (after 1958 anyway I believe) and are pussycats to shoot with these (unlike the J frames).

for a final bit of trivia, Hermann Goering, a firearms connoiseur with thousands of firearms, was carrying a S&W M&P when he was captured...
 

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Model tens are great!

I have several of them, and I like them all. As somone has already so well stated they are everything you need and nothing that you do not in a revolver. Additionally there have been a lot, (probably millions) of them made.
All four of the ones that I have shoot well and I have never had any problems with any of them. I have two older pencil barrel models that I am partial too. It must be some kind of a Dick Tracy nostalgia kind of thing. They are nice and light for carrying also. Again as has already been stated There is a lot of information available on them over at the Smith and Wesson forum. the prices for the older ones are consistently moving up and in particular if they lack the key lock. this appears to be a real issue with S. and W. collectors and fans. Apparently there have been some instances whereby the lock inadvertantly became engaged. Needless to say if this happened at the wrong time. The consequences could be quite serious to say the least.

Enjoy the model ten. If it has not been abused I am sure that you will enjoy it :rock:
 

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The deadliest gun that I have ever seen was a Model 10 round butt pencil barrels that were issued to our department about 40 years ago.

There was a New York Mick named OB who walked a beat for over 20 years. "OB" looked like central casting sent over a tough guy, cigar smoking, knuckle dragging Irish cop with a permanent scowl, permanent BAC of about .015 and a perpetual five o'clock shadow.

Firearms maintenance was not "OB"s strong suit. His piece had a cracked butt secured with electrical tape and a patina of rust eating away at it somewhere. His spare ammo was six green from corrosion rounds in loops on a belt slide.

In four years, in five separate incidents, OB smoked six bad guys with 8 rounds fired. His ammo was the department issue 158 gr. Lead RN.

They took OB off the street so there would be some bad guys left for the rest of us.

Nuff said about a Model 10.
 

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Won't let me join because I use Yahoo mail.
Even if you don't join , there is lot's of good reading material available there :)

I believe the Model 10 / Military & Police has the distinction of be the most produced revolver ever and pretty sure it's been in continuous production since 1899 . Millions sold . Every collector should have atleast one .
 

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The 2" Model 10 was our issued gun for the Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs (now DEA). It was a true tack driver and even with the .38 "round of the day", which was the 110 gr Super Vel, it was a flawless and accurate performer.

Most agents carried it for less than 6 months, before switching to something with greater firepower, i.e. the .45 in various lengths. I was lucky enough to score an Armand Swenson Govt Model and it was a worthy replacement.
 

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Model 10s are wonderful guns. They have everything you need and nothing you don't.
I don't think it can be stated better than this so I'm not going to try. :)

I carried a 6" version for a few years early in my career.
 

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One of the most accurate revolvers I ever owned was a plain-jane fixed sighted model 10 with a pencil bbl. This was certainly no target gun but someone forgot to tell this M10.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Okay, so I have located a few of these at an internet retailer. The salesguy's schpeell was that these are police trade in's, at least 20 years old, and exhibit more holster and handling wear than actual mechanical wear.
Not pretty but good shooters basically. Lock up is said to be nice and tight as I've heard is common with police weapons. Carried a lot but not shot much.

All 4" blued in either standard or heavy barrels with some having round butts. Ranging from good to very good condition.

What's the difference between the standard butts and the round butts?
Any advantages in the standard or heavy barrels?

Anything I should ask about?
 

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Square butt, round butt, standard "pencil" barrel, heavy barrel... I don't believe one is better than the other. It's all a matter of personal preference, aesthetically and ergonomically.

I prefer the square butt with standard barrel because it looks more traditional, but the round butt probably conceals better and the heavy barrel puts a little more weight out front. (I've never seen a heavy barreled M-10 with a round butt, though.)

Ideally, you should be able to choose the revolver that feels the best in your hand, which is kinda hard to do on the internet.
 

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Square butt, round butt, standard "pencil" barrel, heavy barrel... I don't believe one is better than the other. It's all a matter of personal preference, aesthetically and ergonomically.
Agree . Just tell them you want the nicest one regardless .
 

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