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I am being offered a King Cobra from a neighbor, for sale. It's a 6" stainless model with rubber grips. Don't know much about it but it probably has been shot a lot but maintained well at the same time. Also with it, a ton of reloaded .357 ammo, brass and speed loaders.

I love the gun, it looks amazing, but I worry about breaking a part and not having a replacement. Are the firing pins really factory replacement only? Could a good revolver 'smith replace one (if you could ever find one?)
Thanks!
 

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Buy it. Shoot the schit out of it. Worry about broken parts IF they should ever arise.

Bob
 

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Use snap caps for dry firing and you won't have any chance of a broken firing pin.

Firing pin replacement IS a factory-only job.
In order to replace, a special press device with special contoured support dies and punches is used to press the bushing retaining pin, firing pin, and bushing out.
A different set of support dies and punches that work down the barrel are used to press the pin and bushing back in, then a special staking tool that works down the bore is used to re-stake the thin "skirt" of metal around the bushing.

If a local gunsmith tries it, he'll probably try driving it out with a hammer and punch.
This usually damages the frame.
What is usually not noticed or understood is the very thin skirt of metal around the bushing. Many people think it's a burr and stone it off. At worse, they just don't see it at all and it gets partially pushed into the frame hole when the bushing is driven back in.
Result is a ruined frame.

As for the King Cobra, it was the final version of the new type medium frame transfer bar safety-ignition models started with the Colt Mark III of 1969.
These were specifically designed for unlimited use with Magnum ammo.
Master gunsmith Jerry Kuhnhausen thought these were the strongest medium frame DA revolvers ever made, including the S&W 686 and the Ruger GP-100.
Whatever, it is a tank of a revolver.

The design has one caution: The internal parts are an early form of MIM powdered metal molded parts.
These have a very thin glass hard "crust".
You CANNOT polish or stone ANY internal parts to try to improve the trigger.
If you do stone or polish, you'll break through that hard layer, exposing softer metal, ruining the part.

For that reason, a "trigger job" is limited to installing a new spring kit of a lighter mainspring and trigger return spring.
If the gun ever needs any repair, repairs are limited to installing a new part, since you can't alter the parts.
Colt still has parts for repairs and will for years.
In any case, you're unlikely to ever need repairs unless you abuse the gun.

With the cautions of using snap caps for dry firing and not stoning or polishing parts, the King Cobra was one of the best quality, strongest, most durable DA revolvers of the last half of the 20th Century.
The King Cobra was about a step above competing revolvers due to Colt's better polishing and fitting, and Colt's superior forged frames.
The King Cobra is a "legacy" gun that will last several lifetimes with normal care.
 

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Sure wish I'd not let a friend talk me out of mine.

Only production gun that I think exceeded it was Dan Wesson Model 15, because it was so user/owner friendly as for repair or replacement of internals and as strong a frame and stronger cylinders. Other wise yes the fitting and polishing was better, but you did pay for the extra care taken and the name.

But I didn't keep my first Dan Wesson either, the mistakes we make. But I have 6 DW revolvers these days and they are heirloom or legacy guns also. My Colt's are 1911's now days.
 

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Prices keep climbing on them (and all double action Colts). Buy it now and do not look back. You will have a sturdy firearm that will last several lifetimes if properly maintained.
 

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This from a Smith lover.

The King Cobra is a sweet shooter (I've never owned one but a friend does that I shoot). Accurate too with just about any load. My friends is a 44 Mag.
 

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Not trying to hijack this thread. The KC is impressive, more so the more experience with it. Nice gun to train a beginner. They have increased in value but are still worth more to those that enjoy them.

I have a 4" KC that I just sent to the Colt shop. It is a very accurate, easy to shoot revolver. Since it is there, I've asked them to look at everything including a tune up. I rescued this one, it is blued and was sliding around in someone's desk drawer. Finish took a beating.

dfariswheel, if it were you and this is a revolver to stay in the family would you refinish in Royal Blue, hard chrome or something else? Never had a gun refinished and not sure of the issues.
 

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BH9P, I was just playing with you. I hope you did not take offense, to the Anaconda comment.
Both the King Cobra and Anaconda are great revolvers. The rubber grips that come on the Anaconda are the same ones used on the King Cobra.
 

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Not trying to hijack this thread. The KC is impressive, more so the more experience with it. Nice gun to train a beginner. They have increased in value but are still worth more to those that enjoy them.

I have a 4" KC that I just sent to the Colt shop. It is a very accurate, easy to shoot revolver. Since it is there, I've asked them to look at everything including a tune up. I rescued this one, it is blued and was sliding around in someone's desk drawer. Finish took a beating.

dfariswheel, if it were you and this is a revolver to stay in the family would you refinish in Royal Blue, hard chrome or something else? Never had a gun refinished and not sure of the issues.
If it's going to stay in the family, what refinish it gets is not important.
An original blue looks classy, and you don't see Colt level bluing these days.
However, if you going to use it the bluing will wear.
Hard chrome is far more durable if the gun is going to be used, but isn't an original type of Colt finish for the King Cobra.

Comes down to personal preference and how much it'll get used.
 

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Thank you for your insight. It will get used, and used reducing the wear and tear on my inherited Python which is getting a cylinder refinish. A spa session for both at Colt. When I get the call I'll seriously talk about the chrome finish.
 
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