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Discussion Starter #1
Here are mine:

1). Thumb slipped while de-cocking hammer on .410 shotgun.
2). Slam fire while charging a Rem 742 in .243
3). Dove hunting - safety on a Rem 1100 acting funny so pulled trigger to check –

4). IPSC Match – finger got inside trigger guard while going to hard and fast knealing position – bullet somehow hit the A-zone – (scarred the crap outa me nonetheless)
5). Slam fire while single shell loading FN-FAL .308 and dropping the bolt (history repeats #2, 19 years later)

If you shoot a lot, sooner or later you WILL have an AD. Agree or Disagree?
BTW, muzzle was “pointed in a safe direction” on all of mine (TG!). Note: I don’t do Thunderware


All the above happened in the field or at the range over a 40 year period. #1 was at about age 12 (never told my dad). Lots of good posts below, read and learn from the experience of others.


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Whoever said you can’t buy happiness never owned a good 1911.

[This message has been edited by shootist87122 (edited 12-06-2001).]
 

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I have had one, but that is one to many. There is a hole in my cealing that reminds me everyday that because of my stupidity, I could have killed someone. I am very aware of my actions now when handling a firearm now.
 

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I did FIREARMS INSTRUCTION! LOL in an elite Army unit. We trained indeginous personnell in other lands, as well as workups for NG units.

While demonstrating the proper way to lower the hammer on a VERY old and worn 1911A1.. I did the macho appraoch with hand on the grip and finger on trigger.. using same hand thumb to gently lower hammer.

fortunately I had the pistol aimed at the ground, the hammer spur was worn smooth and shiny...and slippery and the hammer slipped.. the pistol fired..

I acted like it was supposed to, like an object lesson, and I said "And THAT is why you ALWAYS block the hammer when lowering it from full stand! any questions?" lol

afterwards my master Sgt, bascially said "You dumbass" lol.

My only error, EVER. And I attribute it all 100% to being a showoff and trying to be a beret wearing prima donna. I am older and wiser now.
 

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I have a hole in my workroom door from and act of great stupidity. I couldn't stop shaking for two hours. I was the only one at home and the direction of fire had a brick wall as a back stop. If my wife or kids had been at home who knows what could of happen.
Every time I go out to put away or clean my firearms I am reminded by that hole to be carefull and to think.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Originally posted by Joel Helms:
the direction of fire had a brick wall as a back stop.
That's why when we dry fire at home, it's important to find a safe direction for the practice. The most respected shooter at our club (Master Class and safe as anyone you will ever meet) had an AR go bang in his garage last year. This was After he cleared it (or so he thought). The round impacted concrete and was contained.
 

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I don't remember ever having an accidental discharge (AD) but I did have a negligent discharge (ND) one day. As an early teen (probably around 13) I used to drop the hammer on my .22 auto's "empty" chamber before putting it away (I know now that you shouldn't do this but I didn't at the time). After the click which would signify that I'd run out of ammo in the tubular magazine I'd check the chamber (in case it was a misfire) and then close the bolt again and dry fire.

One day I pointed it down at the floor in our living room and when I pulled the trigger it fired. Apparently (as still happens once in awhile to this day) the last cartridge hadn't fed from the magazine. The bullet disintegrated on the heavy stones of the floor and the only evidence was a torn seam in the braided rug it had passed through. Thank God my parents weren't home!

This incident taught me to NEVER trust just a check of the chamber to verify that your gun is empty. One must also insure that the magazine is empty as well. It also reinforced, and forever cemented in my mind, that one should never point a gun at anyone or anything that one does not want to shoot. I can thank one of my bosses for extending this rule to, "or where anyone might be, like on the other side of a wall."

When advising new shooters about gun safety I often relate this incident to them. I think that it reinforces the rule better to have a real life example rather than just the words. Staying safe, Gary


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"I knew a man that I did not care for. And then one day this man payed me a call. We sat and talked about things on our mind. Now this man he is a friend of mine" Friend and Lover "Reach Out in the Darkness"
 

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I had mine with a Ruger semi auto .22, the first, and so far the only, screwup I've had!

It was the first time I had ever shot a semi auto. I was stupid and had my finger on the trigger. The closest person was about four feet from the line of fire. No one else even noticed!! I sure did. We were out in the middle of nowhere, so no one was in danger down range. The bullet stopped in a sand dune about fifty yards away.
 

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I've yet to have an accidental or negligent discharge but then again I've only been shooting for 8 years (I'm only 25). Hearing these stories about AD's and ND's has made me more safety conscious (already quite safety conscious as it is)!

I once went shooting with this guy that owned a Sig. When we finished shooting, he loaded the Sig up with his carry ammo and proceeded to drop the hammer NOT using the decock lever but his thumb and pulling the trigger. What's more, he did this while NOT facing downrange and having the gun pointed at my thigh. All of this happened before I realized what was going on.

After I informed him tactfully of what an idiot he was and how that would one day lead to an AD, he simply said that he knew but just didn't think it a big deal. That same idiot now owns a 1911. I forsee an AD in his future. Moreover, that same idiot, who BTW can't keep all his rounds in a mansized target at 7 yards, also thought it would be cool, neat, etc. to carry a snub nose .44 as a primary CCW. Some people just shouldn't have guns.

I think I'll start wearing a vest, ballistic helmet, and goggles when I go to the range from now on.
 

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What Gary said. Most of these sound like negligent discharges. I have had mine, but so far they have been at the range. Both that I recall were while working on drawing and firing and I ended up firing before I intended to do so. The gun was pointed down range and the back stop was hit, but not the target.
 

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I have only had one accidental discharge. Like Double Naught Spy, it was at the range firing a revolver in single action I hit the trigger before I was ready to fire. Fortunately, the gun was pointed down range and I actually hit the corner of the target.

Scared the h*ll out of me, though. I am much more careful now.

WJR
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Originally posted by Double Naught Spy:
Most of these sound like negligent discharges.
Guess I'm from the old school. I have always used the term AD as a word in itself. Has the same meaning as ND in my mind.
 

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Only 1 AD, old Winchester tube fed .22 doubled on me after firing the first shot (clear slamfire as no FP mark on the second shell rim)the round went safely downrange. 1 clear ND; messed up the clearing cycle on a bullseye pistol...My hand was JUST kissed by that razor-sharp Bomar front sight. I'd stopped shooting in midstring because I realized that my mind just wasn't on my shooting and I went to clear the weapon on autopilot. STUPID, STUPID,STUPID...That was a cheap object lesson and now I do not EVER do things related to firearms on autopilot again. I was alone in the bay of an indoor range and the round went into the backstop. I use this example when I teach shooting as an example of complacency. Think I'm on my second or third guardian angel.
 

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When I first got my M1A, I had it double on me. It wasn't clear then (and still isn't clear to me now) whether this was an equipment issue or operator error. I was standing at the 100 yard line. This happened a couple times. Both times, the second shot hit the backstop, though a bit higher than the first.

I use follow through after the shot to hold the trigger back. It is possible that the recoil was enough to make my finger go forward enough after the shot to allow the trigger to reset. Or it is possible that the sear engagement was just too small -- a gunsmith friend of mine looked at the trigger assembly and wasn't comfortable with the amount of engagement. I sent it back to Springfield Armory and they repaired it. The trigger pull is heavier now, but no more doubling.

M1911
 

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Here's a good one:

While pheasant hunting, and on the opposite side of heavy cover from my two partners, a bird flushed. I shot the rooster, and was ready for a follow up shot when the dog tackled the bird. I DID NOT PLACE THE SAFETY BACK ON. It wasn't my dog, and he was reluctant to fetch to me. I placed the 12 gauge butt down and kneeled beside it. A fold in my heavy H2O proof pants at the knee pulled the damn trigger! After the gun went off about a foot from my head, I was totally stunned. The friends called out, but I did not immediately reply. At the second panicked-sounding shout, I unsteadily said I'm ok. But very embarrassed. The guy was only asking about his dog! Don't blame him, would've been one less guy to shoot at pheasants in this world...

Muzzle control saved my life.
 

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Fortunately I've never had one with a firearm. Yet. I did have one when I was handling an Olympic quality air rifle. For some reason I stuck my finger into the trigger guard while it was pointed at the ceiling, and Olympic triggers being as light as they are, I have a nice clean .177 caliber hole to remind me about where fingers belong when handling a gun.
 

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Had an ND once, fortunately it wasn't a REAL gun. I was demonstrating to a friend how pistols won't fire out of battery and why some operators installed Strike kits on their firearms, but I was using a loaded airsoft Beretta to do it. There I was, barrel to my palm, pushing the slide back slightly and squeezed the trigger a few times to demonstrate that it wouldn't fire and explaining that the real Beretta 92/M9 does this as well. Unfortunately, I still had the trigger tensioned when I pulled my left hand away and the gun discharged, planting a 6mm plastic BB a la Jesus Christ into my palm. Fortunately it wasn't powerful enough to penetrate but I carried a nice blood welt for a couple of weeks.

Scared the shiet out of me.



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I was shooting my 1911 with a friend. I shot my 5. Turned my head to talk to my friend. Then Bam!

I violated rule #3, "Keep your finger off the trigger..." I forgot that I loaded a full magazine and never realized that I pulled the trigger. Luckily the gun was still pointed down range. Very embarrassing but educational. I am now keenly aware of my finger position.

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After cleaning a Browning HP, I absent mindedly inserted a loaded mag to disengage the mag safety, then proceeded to close the slide and pull the trigger. Ruined a kitchen cabinet and bruised my ego, it could have been worse.

Now I always follow the rule of no ammo in the same room when I'm cleaning.

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When the world is at peace, a gentleman keeps his sword at his side.
 
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