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Anybody know why Tetra Grease is corroding my stainless (barrel and slide)? I flunked chemistry...
 

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I can't say for sure, but maybe their free chlorinated hydrocarbons they use as an EP additive? Under heat and pressure they form hydrochloric acid. Is the corrosion all over or at the high friction areas?
 

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I spoke long ago with a lube engineer who talked about additives. Using certain additives that would in some situations be harmful but turning them to your advantage in their interactions with other additives and the lubricating regimes themselves, is what in the business is referred to as an "elegant" solution. I would guess that the epoxidized additives and their acid scavenging properties, such as those in FP-10, would merit the "elegant" title. I can only say that no other high-tech gun lube manufacturer that I've run across, other than MPC, EVER addresses the issue of heat-formed and pressure-formed acid-induced corrosion, which is one of the ubiquitous results of chlorinated additives.
 

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Re: gigi,

dubb-1 said:
I noticed the problem on the outside of the barrel...Not so much after shooting, but just while sitting in the (dehumidified) safe. Then I found FP10.:D

Be well!
Who greases the outside of the barrel? Not sure what you mean. Is it possible the grease is not causing the corrosion but just not able to prevent it?

I have about six stainless guns and have never seen any corrosion while using Tetra. I switched from Tetra a while back to a mixture of RIG +p grease and Militec liquid (about 60/40 mix) for stainless guns. RIG is specifically designed to protect stainless and the Militec is the slickest lubricant on the market.
 

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gigi*riva said:
I spoke long ago with a lube engineer who talked about additives. Using certain additives that would in some situations be harmful but turning them to your advantage in their interactions with other additives and the lubricating regimes themselves, is what in the business is referred to as an "elegant" solution. I would guess that the epoxidized additives and their acid scavenging properties, such as those in FP-10, would merit the "elegant" title. I can only say that no other high-tech gun lube manufacturer that I've run across, other than MPC, EVER addresses the issue of heat-formed and pressure-formed acid-induced corrosion, which is one of the ubiquitous results of chlorinated additives.
Well said gigi*riva.
Thats one of the things that really got me interested in the FP-10,the fact that George/MPC put forth a flood of information on the chemistry and formulation of the FP-10.How it works,what it will or will not do etc.
Unlike the other manufacturers that will not go beyond the advertisement hype,MPC seems to set the standard in releasing detailed product information on just about every aspect of the FP-10.
Ive tried just about every type of gun lube out there in the last two years trying to find something to replace the Break Free that Ive used since 1989,and the Firepower FP-10 is the only thing that has done the job 100%.

Raymond
 

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I've used Tetra almost since it became available - and have never seen any rust on any of my guns. Are you saying that firing the gun turns Tetra lube into a corrosive? I realize there are a number of variables here that could produce different results for different users - some related to the lube, some not at all.

Freedom Arms, Fulton Armory, Kimber, ParaOrd, Beretta, Marlin, Savage, Bushmaster, Walther and a number of other companies use it in production and/or recommend Tetra to their customers.

In my area it is popular because it works well in cold weather. Tetra literature gives actual accuracy, friction reduction (better than FP) and velocity improvement numbers that I assume they can document should someone call them on it. And if it is untrue, Muscle/FP should do so, in court. I certainly would.

You have me headed to my gunsafe to look - if I find any corrosion you'll be the first to know!

Warmly, Col. Colt
 

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I've been using Tetra on my S&W, Kimber and various Colts with no problems.
 

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Acid-induced corrosion is pretty much invisible initially...it starts with micro-pitting and micro-fissures. Eventually these become visible, or they result in failure of the base metal. I should have asked how long Gun-ther has been using the Tetra. I'm also assuming from the way his question is posed that he has traced the corrosion to the grease.

I'm happy to hear that you folks haven't had problems. I won't let anything on my guns without a published or furnished MSDS. I also shy away from products with a "proprietary," i.e. undisclosed, additive, especially if it refers to a lubricity or ep additive.
 

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I'm with Bountyhunter and think that Tetra oil and grease aren't rust-inducive; simply, from my tests their anticorrosion properties are weak indeed. Try a good antirust grease as RIG or Militec-1 (not the oil!) or a good oil as Break-Free, Corrosion-X, Prolix and many others. Regards, MAXM
 

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I have a stainless Colt and a SA m1a. I use Tetra on both. I have found that the grease trun brownish over time. Several times I have seen something that looks like rust that has me freaked out but then wipes off. I esp noticed it on some 1911 internals..

So is it rust or is the lube or the lube carrier settling out?
 

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I recently used this grease called Super Lube in my 1911, after checking with the mafr. about any compatibility issues with the CLP I use. A few weeks later the gun "grew" what looked like brown sugar crystals anywhere I applied the grease. The gun was mightily glued together. It was tenacious stuff and had to soak the gun in mineral spirits to get that crap off. Now the gun wasn't fired, so I know in this case it wasn't acid-induced corrosion.

The gun was essentially inoperable until it was detail stripped and re-lubed, this time with oil only, no grease.
 

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I had this happen with the old formulation Tetra (the stuff that smelled like bad cheese) on a Browning Hi power barrel. Posted that it had happened and got a bunch of responses that essentially said it couldn't have/shouldn't have, etc.

It was a dark discoloration that was in the shape of the fluid dispersion on the barrel. Not even sure it was corrosion. It did not wipe off but I got it off by using one of those yellow lead remover cloths on it and polishing it off. There was not pitting or visible degradation of the metal - it was almost like a stain. Still, I had to polish pretty vigorously to get rid of it.

Haven't had a single problem with the new formulation. Note that I live in a portion of the world that does not suffer from high humidity however.

Did have a little rust spot appear on a Kart barrel recently that was lubed with FP-10.
 
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