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Discussion Starter #1
Not sure if this should go here or on the Springfield Forum, but I figured Dana would find it quicker here.

An observation first on the Springfield WWII. It started out with blocky frame and front strap, black grips, loaded chamber indicator, and polished barrel. All that got fixed, and I think for the better. I understand why the ILS had to stay to meet some state certification requirements. But why would Springfield use what Dana has described as a "late commercial type" thumb safety? Surely it couldn't have cost that much to put a true military type thumb safety on it.

So, was there ever a thumb safety like the one on the WWIIs on any military 1911? Are any of the correct style available and would they just "drop in"? And slightly aside from the thumb safety questions, on the older USGIs, did the parkerizing on the barrel that shows through the ejection port get scuffed up or was the fitting loose enough that it didn't?

All this being said, I'm ecstatic with the quality and authenticity of my PW9108L, especially for the price of less than $400, and would recommend one to anyone interested in a reliable plain-jane handgun, as mine has been so far, with nostalgia added.
 

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Okay, I found it. :) However, it's more Springfield than GI-related so it's being moved there.

I assume SA decided it wasn't worth the bother to create a new MIM mold to replicate the WW2-style small-shelf thumb safety. Most folks wouldn't notice anyway. The hammer isn't exactly like WW2 units either, as only Ithaca hammers were serrated and they had a slightly different profile. By the way, original WW2 barrels were all blued, not parkerized. And yes, after awhile the chamber hoods get all scuffed up from cycling the slide.

All in all however, they are nice guns for $450 and under. They are certainly much better now that SA finally decided to make the frame contours more like a real GI gun and less like a brick.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Dana,
Thanks for the reply and all the work on your Website. It was one of the reasons I got re-interested in the GI .45 about three years ago.
 

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replace that MS housing w/Smith Alexander!

Not only that thumb safety is not realistic. The mainspring housing on many GI guns was checkered. A Smith Alexander Mainspring Housing fixes that problem. You would need to parkerize it to match the pistol. The trigger is not exactly all that authentic. I am still looking for someone to manufacture a realistic trigger with checkering (just like a GI gun).
 

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One word on thumb safeties. They DO have to be fitted.
You can find them at your gunsmith, or on ebay, along with the triggers and mainspring housings. Numrich also has the triggers and MSH.
 

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I think it's pretty plain to see that SA didn't really intended to make a historically correct WWII 1911A1 . Hence the roll markings and other differences . They are taking a historically popular , gun collecting time period [WWII] and running with it until it peters out .
It's about sales not authenticity . imo

Bottom line . It's a great gun for the money . Enjoy . :)
 

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guy sajer said:
I think it's pretty plain to see that SA didn't really intended to make a historically correct WWII 1911A1 . Hence the roll markings and other differences . They are taking a historically popular , gun collecting time period [WWII] and running with it until it peters out .
It's about sales not authenticity . imo

Bottom line . It's a great gun for the money . Enjoy . :)
They did produce what I think is the best generic G.I. gun available :) . I'd gladly buy another!
 

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Thumb Safety Sear Stop Surface (or "Lobe")

Xavier,
I know all about fitting the thumb safety and check the gun for an audible click (Colt factory test) for sufficient sear stop surface (lobe length of the thumb safety). Basically the thumb safety is fit with just enough arrest surface length. That the sear arrest surface will index and lock the sear. But the free space (when the safety is on) should not be to create a gap between the sear stop surface. Minimal filing for full indexing of the thumb safety and no more. I know how to fit that part and test that part.
:)
 

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I sometimes wonder why the GI thumb safety died... IME they're not quite "everything good about an extended safety with none of the bad", but they're not far off.
 

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Thumb safeties...

As long as we are talking about GI parts on our WWII mil specs.

I would just like to know where I can get GI thumb safeties for my WWII mil specs.

Anyone?

-Warlock
 

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Re: Thumb Safety Sear Stop Surface (or "Lobe")

NATIONALMATCH said:
Xavier,
I know all about fitting the thumb safety and check the gun for an audible click (Colt factory test) for sufficient sear stop surface (lobe length of the thumb safety). Basically the thumb safety is fit with just enough arrest surface length. That the sear arrest surface will index and lock the sear. But the free space (when the safety is on) should not be to create a gap between the sear stop surface. Minimal filing for full indexing of the thumb safety and no more. I know how to fit that part and test that part.
:)
NM,
Texian asked if the thumb safety was a drop in part in the first post of this thread. I was not responding to you. I can fit a thumb safety as well. :confused:
 
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