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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After wet tumbling, I dry my brass in the oven at 170 degrees for 30 min.
Yesterday I forgot to take them out after cooling. The wife then set the oven
to 425 and when it came up to temp she found them and took them out.
They are now an iridescent orange but other than that they seem ok.
Do you think this will cause any problem when loaded?

Joe O
 

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I wouldn't think that 425 for 10 or so minutes would retemper the brass. To anneal takes bringing the temp up way higher momentarily to soften the necks but I don't have a color chart handy for temp comparisons sake but it substantially changed the brass color if I understand you correctly? Orange? Did you rinse the wet tumbling solution off your brass in hot running water before putting them in the oven? I sonic clean mine with RCBS solution and a spot of Dawn and rinse them throughly in hot water in the sink prior to drying. I wonder if the color change could be the solution baked on the brass? How does the brass feel?
 

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Hi Brick, do you think 425 for a while leeched the Zink to the surface? it would be a time factor if so, as the brass is subjected to an extreme temp when fired of course but only for a millisecond.
 

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in my 15y years of reloading, I have chosen from time to time to throw away bullets and brass if I had any doubt about their suitability or safety. I was just out polishing with my bench buffing system some pick up 44 mag brass, as my vibrating cleaner just wouldn't' get them really clean and shiny. Found one with a tiny possible crack? Wasn't sure, so threw it away. Recently had to throw away 100 Hornady bullets when I had bought ones just a little too long for my AR mags. I am no metallurgist, but when in doubt, I suggest discarding them. Better than a stuck case in your receiver, or other. Brass and bullets area cheap, guns are expensive. Nv
 

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Is there a reasonable safety factor between the temperature these cases were subjected to and the temperature where you start to anneal brass?

I would say that it's a bit too close as there are probably a few unknowns regarding time and temperature.

I have done the exact same thing with 9mm brass but the time and temperature was well known in that case.

The color start to change somewhere between 150F and 250F. I noticed when trying to determine the max safe drying temperature for brass.
 

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Zinc melts at about 419*C so a 450*F oven shouldn't have done anything to it. My understanding is that to anneal brass it takes about 600* so you didn't get to that threshold and destroy the integrity of the case head...

I'm clueless as to what the orange discoloration-perhaps a reaction with whatever is in your tumbling solution, I don't know.
 

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They are now an iridescent orange but other than that they seem ok.
Do you think this will cause any problem when loaded?
Joe O
Joe, if you don't have a dry media tumbler send them to me along with return postage. I throw them in mine, tumble the snot out of them, and see if the color change is surface only. If they clean up, I send them back to you. If not I either send them back or return the "return postage" to you and scrap them.

Grumpy
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I wouldn't think that 425 for 10 or so minutes would retemper the brass. To anneal takes bringing the temp up way higher momentarily to soften the necks but I don't have a color chart handy for temp comparisons sake but it substantially changed the brass color if I understand you correctly? Orange? Did you rinse the wet tumbling solution off your brass in hot running water before putting them in the oven? I sonic clean mine with RCBS solution and a spot of Dawn and rinse them throughly in hot water in the sink prior to drying. I wonder if the color change could be the solution baked on the brass? How does the brass feel?
Did my normal routine, after tumbling I rinse with water out of the hose till nice snd clear followed by two with distilled. The brass is smooth as glass and other than color they look like all previous batches. I tumble them with walnut and see what happens. When I get home in the morning I’ll post some pix.
 

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When in doubt throw them out. Pitch them and chalk it up to a learning experience. Once I had bought some cheap corn cob media from the pet supply. It was "chunky" and worked great on straight wall pistol cases. When I threw in 100 223 the chunks worked down into the brass and then would not come out. I tried to get it out and then said the heck with it and into the scrap bucket they went.
 

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When in doubt throw them out. Pitch them and chalk it up to a learning experience. Once I had bought some cheap corn cob media from the pet supply. It was "chunky" and worked great on straight wall pistol cases. When I threw in 100 223 the chunks worked down into the brass and then would not come out. I tried to get it out and then said the heck with it and into the scrap bucket they went.
Oh, be still my brass scrounger's heart. I've tossed cases that were too bulged to resize correctly (9mm) and cried all night. :)

Grumpy
 

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Annealing on brass cartridges is red-hot. You can see this in videos of the process. The oven was not close, and what if it was? The brass had not been annealed after the last shooting, so it would be a good thing.
 

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Do you leave the primers in? Is that why you bake them to dry?
I use a wet method to clean my cases; did about 375 40 & 10mm cases together yesterday. I always remove the primers so that the primer pockets are cleaned. I put them in the oven at 175 degrees for 45 minutes, turn the oven off and let them sit for another hour or so. They come out looking like new. Using the oven is simply a quick means of drying them. Nothing else.
 

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I always remove the primers so that the primer pockets are cleaned.

Using the oven is simply a quick means of drying them. Nothing else.
Gotcha. I also wet tumble but with a hot rinse, they seem to dry in 5-10 minutes on a towel. I do run a little white noise fan over them too.
 
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