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I just came across an interesting piece of history, an old obituary for Lt. Col. Edwin Ramsey who led the last mounted Cavalry charge in US military history:

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/o...st-cavalry-charge-by-the-us-army-8557345.html

It took place during 1942 in the Philippines:

He and the rest of his 27-man platoon (G Troop of 26th US Cavalry), their heads low over their horses' necks and firing their Colt 1911 pistols (the US Cavalry had hung up its traditional sabres a decade earlier), galloped headlong into a far larger force of Japanese infantrymen in the village of Morong on the Bataan peninsula of the Philippines.
 

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Great story, but more impressive to me is that he took to the jungle for three years to fight the Japanese under appalling conditions. He never surrendered. One Helluva tough dude.
 

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His Filipino troops never surrendered either. And they could have just faded into the background any time.

The last bayonet charge was... guesses?

(I know the answer).
 

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His Filipino troops never surrendered either. And they could have just faded into the background any time.

The last bayonet charge was... guesses?

(I know the answer).

Scout Platoon 1-9 Inf 7th ID Light in Panama Dec 1989.


Last Horse Mounted Cavalry was the 124th Cav, MARSMEN, MARS Task Force 1944, China-Burma-India. Jack Knight! "Golpeo Rapidimente"
 

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Korea, 1951. CPT Lewis Millett commanding E CO, 27th INF Regiment.
Bob
You're right as far as the last bayonet charge by Americans. Millet was awarded the Medal of Honor for his troubles then served later on in Vietnam I believe. He was quite a character according to history.

But that wasn't the last unit bayonet charge in battle.

Last bayonet charge (I believe), was a reinforced platoon of the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders. May 2004, near Basra in Iraq, after being ambushed by the Mahdi Army. They charged across open ground and into the usual warren of trenches and grape huts, where it became close quarters. Probably hand to bayonet - I doubt the Mahdi Army ever thought of putting a bayonet on an AK47. Probably think they're just for sawing the heads off people with their hand's bound.

They killed 20 of an estimated 100 attackers. Interesting sidenote is that the sergeant leading the charge was awarded the Military Medal - for the attack and saving the life of another soldier who had won the Victoria Cross a short time earlier for repeatedly going into fire to rescue comrades.

Between Korea and Iraq, the Aussies put in a bayonet charge in Viet Nam against a Viet Cong stronghold. Twice. They didn't succeed.

And in the Falkland's War in 1982, the Scots Guards stormed Mount Tumbledown with fixed bayonets under cover of darkness and cleared the defenses with butts and bayonets as they drove the Argies Marine Infantry Battalion off the high ground. The major leading that one was also awarded the Military Cross - had his compass shot off his webbing in the fighting.

But to the best of my knowledge, it was the other bunch of Scots who win the award for the most recent bayonet charge in history.

I kind of like the idea of the ISIS butchers getting a taste of The Ladies From Hell closing with them, bayonets fixed. They have such a love of knives, be nice to see them playing by big boy rules for a change where they're not the only ones with cold steel.
 

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I've read (and heard and been told) that the bayonet is an anachronism from a long ago time. Out dated, not required in this day and age. IMO the obit for the bayonet is premature.
 

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When you are out of ammo a big knife attached to the front of your rifle is better than a fist.
 

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I've read (and heard and been told) that the bayonet is an anachronism from a long ago time. Out dated, not required in this day and age. IMO the obit for the bayonet is premature.
To each his own...

Putting a bayonet on a M14 is one thing, but on a M4 is almost a joke. Surely the M4 is not the hammer of Thor either for buttstroking.

Probably the bayonet (or any large knife) in the hand is more useful, and a machete MUCH more, as a weapon and tool.

I think most of these glowing reports on modern "bayonet charges" are quite bloated with propaganda.
 

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As far as a cavalry charge I grew up around horses and am not a "horse lover" but I can see where those troopers had to start pretty tough to get a horse to do what you wanted it to do esp. charge into gunfire, etc.
 

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To each his own...

Putting a bayonet on a M14 is one thing, but on a M4 is almost a joke. Surely the M4 is not the hammer of Thor either for buttstroking.

Probably the bayonet (or any large knife) in the hand is more useful, and a machete MUCH more, as a weapon and tool.

I think most of these glowing reports on modern "bayonet charges" are quite bloated with propaganda.
A bayonet works just as well on the M16 series of rifles as anything else. A buttstroke works just fine as well. Just 'cause it's a lighter rifle doesn't mean it's any less tough.

That's a lot of standoff distance to lose. Warfare tactics haven't changed drastically through the years, just the equipment.
 

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http://www.defensemedianetwork.com/...he-last-horse-cavalry-charge-of-the-u-s-army/

I was a cavalry officer at Fort Riley, Kansas. The 26th Cavalry was well known at Fort Riley at the United States Cavalry Museum. I remember the curator was an officer with the 26th Cavalry. It is well worth a visit off of the Interstate nearby.

United States Cavalry Museum & Vehicle display: Open Tuesday through Saturday from 10 AM. - 4 PM (785) 239-2743. Free
 

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I've read (and heard and been told) that the bayonet is an anachronism from a long ago time. Out dated, not required in this day and age. IMO the obit for the bayonet is premature.
Would that be the immediate descendants of the people who said there was no reason to put a gun on the F-4 Phantom because it would be an anachronism from a long time ago?

To each his own...

Putting a bayonet on a M14 is one thing, but on a M4 is almost a joke. Surely the M4 is not the hammer of Thor either for buttstroking.

Probably the bayonet (or any large knife) in the hand is more useful, and a machete MUCH more, as a weapon and tool.

I think most of these glowing reports on modern "bayonet charges" are quite bloated with propaganda.
Sounds like the same mindset that saw no reason for a gun on the Phantom.

That might well be your opinion. Here in the infantry we tend to see things a little differently. Particularly the infantry that has spent a lot of time in the last little while actually doing the business.

If you have some knowledge that the bayonet charges mentioned here are bloated with propaganda, I'd be interested in seeing what you consider to be the more factual account. The Brits are not given to overstating military affairs.

On the other hand, if you want to take a bayonet in your hand and try your luck against somebody else with the bayonet mounted on the rifle... well, good luck with that. If you think you are going to shrug off a buttstroke or a face shot from a 9 - 11 lb weapon wielded by a motivated infantryman or marine... good luck with that as well. Soldiers don't have to tear your head off with a mace - they just have to put you down where they can kill you with bayonet, butt, or boots kicking your brains out, whatever is handy at the moment. A bayonet on any variant of the M16 - or the Brit SA80 if you prefer (something your neighbors to the south could tell you about) - will do that just fine.

Bayonet charges and bayonet fighting are not the preferred method of destroying the enemy, and I don't think anyone would say that. Nor is hand to hand combat. Those of us in the infantry business would prefer to to stand off at a safe distance and do the job with overwhelming numbers and firepower. But as has already been said, ground war isn't always in the star wars age. Hand to hand combat during assaults has taken place in current operations, as has clearing enemy positions with bayonets. Just because you would prefer not to do it doesn't mean you won't have to do it.

And that's why we still train our soldiers in unarmed combat and fighting with the bayonet. Because that still happens in the real world. And it will happen in the future as well.



14 May 2004
The battle began when over 100 Mahdi army fighters ambushed two unarmored vehicles transporting around 20 Argylls on the isolated Route Six highway near the southern city of Amarah. Ensconced in prepared fighting positions and trenches along the road, the militiamen fired mortars, rocket propelled grenades, and machine gun rounds. The vehicles stopped and British troops returned fire. The Mahdi barrage caused enough damage to force the troops to exit the vehicles.

The soldiers quickly established a defensive perimeter and radioed for reinforcements from the main British base at Amarah – Camp Abu Naji. Reinforcements from the Princess of Wales’s Royal Regiment assisted the Argyles in an offensive operation against the Mahdi militiamen. When ammunition ran low among the British troops and no further help was immediately available, the decision was made to fix bayonets for a direct assault on the enemy trenches and weapons positions.
 

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You do the job with whatever weapon you have. Like I said before, a bayonet mounted on the end of a rifle is better than a bayonet in the hand or just the hand.
 

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And- A bayonet on the M4 is worth TWO bayonets in the bush! :)

I knew about the last Philippine cavalry charge, musta been a helluva situation to charge stationary forces on horseback with pistols.
Talk about guts.
Denis
 

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Well, if the legend holds true the Japanese saw the mighty 1911s in their hands and became terrified, breaking ranks in short order. :eek:

Seriously, when you think how the average soldier claimed you couldn't hit anything with a .45 standing still I'm amazed how those cavalrymen managed to show everybody up doing it from a galloping horse.
 
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