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Hey all! Nice to be here.
I have a question related directly to the LDA trigger squeeze on the .40 cal handgun (well, any caliber cartridge really).
I have never personally fired one of these guns (not a 1911, just a Para LDA) and I am curious to find out more regarding the Light Double Action reset.
I understand what LDA is, the approximate 6.5 lb trigger pull, and how the weapon works. I think that this is ingenious but nevermind my simplistic opinion.
The question:
DOES THE LDA TRIGGER RESET ITSELF AFTER A SHOT LIKE A GLOCK TRIGGER (HALFWAY BACK TO ITS NORMAL STARTING POSITION) OR IS IT MORE LIKE AN XD OR BERETTA DA (IE) WHERE THE TRIGGER RESETS VERY CLOSE TO ITS STARTING POSITION GIVING A LONG RESET AND ADDITIONAL LONG PULLS???
Thanks for the help guys, happy shooting.
 

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The LDA is DA-only meaning it needs a full trigger pull every stroke, just like the Glock. There's no difference in trigger pull on either the LDA or Glock for the first round or subsequent rounds.

It's a longer trigger pull and reset than the Glock because the cocking design is slightly different. It's not a DA/SA like the Beretta or SIG where subsequent shots are with a very short trigger pull (like the M1911 is all the time).

Also like the Glock and M1911 the LDA trigger has no immediate second strike capability. Can't just pull the trigger a second time like you can on the Beretta or SIG. (We all try, of course!) Like the M1911 the LDA hammer can be manually recocked and the trigger will function for a second strkie on a cartridge, a capability that's good to have if you can't cycle the slide. Unlike the M1911 the LDA hammer, even when cocked will ball back down but not fire until the trigger is pulled.

With the bobbed hammer LDA you'll need to cycle the slide in the event of a misfire -- always a good idea if you're capable.

With the grip safety and long trigger pull the M1911 type thumb safety is largly redundant, the pistol can be safely carried fully loaded with the safety on FIRE, just like most other modern pistols.

-- Chuck
 

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Chuck S said:
Like the M1911 the LDA hammer can be manually recocked and the trigger will function for a second strkie on a cartridge, a capability that's good to have if you can't cycle the slide. -- Chuck
AHHHHH! NO!!!!! You can NOT manually cock any LDA hammer, even though they do put a spur on the hammer. You must cycle the slide to re-cock the gun, and trying to cock the hammer may damage the works.

Chuck S said:
With the bobbed hammer LDA you'll need to cycle the slide in the event of a misfire -- always a good idea if you're capable.
-- Chuck
You have to do it even if the hammer isn't bobbed. I have never figured out why the put a hammer with a cocking spur on a gun that can't be cocked, but they do?????:confused:
 

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Try it.

The hammer won't stay cocked, and will fall alarmingly onto the firing pin, but the internal hammer is designed to cock when external hammer is pulled back. Unless this is changed from the original LDA system.

-- Chuck
 

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Chuck S said:
Try it.

The hammer won't stay cocked, and will fall alarmingly onto the firing pin, but the internal hammer is designed to cock when external hammer is pulled back. Unless this is changed from the original LDA system.

-- Chuck
It's not changed. It still works, but it is still strongly recommended against because it puts a lot of stress on some of the internal parts. It's like running a jet on Kerosine -- it works for a while, but it will not work for very long so you'd better only do it if you don't have a choice. You will eventually break parts if you manually cock the hammer.
 

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Not recommending manually cocking the hammer routinely, but the capability is there if you need it. Trying to cycle the slide with one hand is a difficult trick under the best of conditions.

With a bobbed hammer you'd best develop that technique.

-- Chuck
 

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The Big Dog
The LDA is one of the best double action trigger systems that I've ever had the pleasure to shoot. The mistake I see most people make when shooting the LDA is trying to stage the trigger like with a DA revolver and this slows your trigger time way down. I tell everyone to just squeeze the trigger straight through and they are surprised at how fast they can shoot the LDA with a high degree of accuracy by doing so and reset time is very fast.

I have a P-18.9 LDA in the shop that I've done a trigger job on and everyone that shoots it swears its 2 lbs or lighter, however it will hold all my trigger weights (4&1/4 lbs) and the trigger still does not break. This may very well be the light trigger thats lawyer proof.

As for damaging the system by thumb cocking the hammer, yes it can damage it and I advise against doing so. After having the LDA trigger system apart numerous times( enough I think I could do it in my sleep) I find it to be a very well designed system with more safety features than any others I've seen.

As for trying to cock the hammer to fire a round that misfired, well this may very well get you killed. I was taught that at best, there's a 50/50 chance that the misfired round will fire if its tried the second time. Personally I'll rack a fresh round in the gun and if I only have one hand to do so with, I'll use the method the military taught me.
Regards
Bob Hunter
(816) 675-2340
www.huntercustoms.com
 

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the LDAs I tired in the gunshow this wekend was not 6.5 pds., they were sweeeet. Planning to get one next year possibly for carry or production P 16 40 LDA.
 

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Bob --

You're reading my posts way too fast. ;)

Like the M1911 the LDA hammer can be manually recocked and the trigger will function for a second strkie on a cartridge, a capability that's good to have if you can't cycle the slide.
Note the words "if you can't cycle the slide." And there will be times you can't, especially if you're hit, hugging the ground, or both. Tap, rack, bang has been around for 90 years, but isn't the best procedure.

On modern military pistols like the M9 (M92FS) and M11 (P228) the first step in immediate action is pull the trigger again (with the safety off on the M9), then if that fails go into slide manipulation -- if you can. There are ways to do it one handed, but they're very slow. In the case of a M1911 or other design with an external hammer you can thumb it back if you can't cycle the slide.

-- Chuck
 

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No Chuck I'm not reading your post way to fast;) I know exactly what you said and I know exactly what I said.
The LDA system is not designed to be cocked by thumb cocking the hammer and it can be damaged by doing so. Yes I know its possible to thumb cock the hammer, that being said its very hard to do, especially one handed.
As for my comment about second strike capabilities, I was never refering to tap, rack, bang, I was refering to one handed slide manipulation taught to me while in the military and this is the method I would use if the need was there to put a fresh round in the chamber and I only had one good hand. I would much rather chamber a new round after a misfire than waste time thumb cocking a hammer and at best have a 50% chance the round will go off.
Second strike capabilities in a gun can be very misleading as a good thing and there has been cases where some have lost their life by continious pulling on the trigger and when the gun was checked the chamber was empty.

blum5,
I have to agree that the LDA trigger system is the sweetest double action system I've ever shot and it can be made even sweeter. I plan on shooting a LDA 18.9 in production next year. If you see me at a match come on up and say hi, also I'll be glad to let you test fire the 18.9 and see what you think.
Regards
Bob Hunter
(816) 675-2340
www.huntercustoms.com
 

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Bob --

I've no idea where your "50% failure" for a second strike comes from, the current procedure is to attempt a second strike before manipulating the slide. Takes no time at all with modern pistols and can be done one handed with a traditional SA M1911.

-- Chuck
 

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bulm5 said:
the LDAs I tired in the gunshow this wekend was not 6.5 pds., they were sweeeet. Planning to get one next year possibly for carry or production P 16 40 LDA.
My 1640 LDA (all stock) breaks at 5 pounds even. I believe Para guarantees something like 5 - 6.5#, or they used to. Mine came new with a slip with the trigger break force hand written on it by the person who final tested it. It was closer to 6# when new, but has lightened some with use. They do feel lighter than they are.
 

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bountyhunter said:
...It was closer to 6# when new, but has lightened some with use. They do feel lighter than they are.
Mine was the same way. The trigger was very good when I got it. I bought it new, fired around 1500 rounds through it, and then had it ultrasonically cleaned and re-lubed. When I got it back, the trigger was truly outstanding.
 

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Racking Slide One-handed

Hunter,
Is there a thread describing how to rack one-handed? Sounds difficult.
 

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Hunter Customs said:

blum5,
I have to agree that the LDA trigger system is the sweetest double action system I've ever shot and it can be made even sweeter. I plan on shooting a LDA 18.9 in production next year. If you see me at a match come on up and say hi, also I'll be glad to let you test fire the 18.9 and see what you think.
Regards
Bob Hunter
(816) 675-2340
www.huntercustoms.com
I'll take you up on your offer. Are ypu planning to shoot IPSC matches thsi year???
 

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rroberrt,
I'm sure there's some threads on the Forum discussing this however I do not know where they are located. There was several methods that was taught to us but one of them is very simple and can be done very fast. I do not wish to discuss this on a public Forum but if you want to e-mail me at [email protected] I'll explain to you how it was taught to us.

blum5
Yes I plan on shooting several USPSA/IPSC matches this year and I may try most of them in the production division using the P-18.9.
I plan on trying to get in some classifiers at Topeka Kansas, and Rolla Missouri using the P-18.9.

Regards
Bob Hunter
(816) 675-2340
www.huntercustoms.com
 

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If a first strike fails, why even bother with attempting a second strike? It the round is bad, chances are a dozen strikes won't help, and the only remedy is to rack the slide and chamber a new round. If, on the other hand, the weapon is bad, the only way to find out is to rack the slide and chamber a new round.

There are plenty of techniques to rack a slide using one hand, as Bob mentioned, and should be included in any "tactical" training regimen. This technique is discussed in Dave Lauck's "Tactical 1911" as I recall, and in many other books as well.
 

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marvl said:
There are plenty of techniques to rack a slide using one hand, as Bob mentioned, and should be included in any "tactical" training regimen. This technique is discussed in Dave Lauck's "Tactical 1911" as I recall, and in many other books as well.
Hooking the rear sight on your belt and pushing down is what I learned. What are the other methods?
 

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PGW said:
Hooking the rear sight on your belt and pushing down is what I learned. What are the other methods?
I recall if the 1911 has the short recoil rod (per the original JMB design) you can hook the front of the slide just under the barrel on the edge of any flat surface and cycle the slide by pushing the frame forward. As I recall, it's one of the reasons that 1911 purists object to the full length rod because it can not be done if a FLGR is installed. I think I'd certainly prefer that to hooking it on my belt loop and endangering the family jewels.
 
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