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Discussion Starter #1


This time I held the guns sideways in my hand. My wrist wasn't in the equation. I only tried to keep the guns from flipping completely out of my hand (I almost drop the Beretta as you'll see). Another thing to consider is that the guns are not only flipping up but are allowed to move backwards 6+ inches during recoil... something that wouldn't happen if you were using a proper two hand hold.

As noted by several others, the Glock absolutely will not cycle when being "limp wristed". It failed to cycle every single time.

The Beretta would fail usually once per mag, it did fail twice once. It also fired several magazines without a failure.

The others worked flawlessly including my buddies "truck gun" which is an old Colt Commander (1991A1) that literally hasn't been cleaned in 10 years. It's covered in rust and is filthy. I threw it in there expecting it to fail (it was bone dry too).

The other guns were freshly cleaned and lubed with Rem Oil. All were firing Winchester White Box.
 

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Hey, thank you for not only doing the test, but filming it, then posting you. You went through a lot of trouble for us.

I was surprised byt he results. The gun everyone thought just worked, didn't, the Glock.

Good work.
 

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I've tried many times to "limp wrist" my 1911's...they've always cycled. I believe there is a difference between that and submitting to the recoil, which results in a voluntary pull-back of the shooting hand/stance. This does not allow the built-in recoil action to perform it's duties. Limp wristing DOES allow the 1911 to complete it's cycle with only the weight of the pistol alone. The problem I've seen is when shooters lift the gun either in anticipation of recoil or to reduce it instinctively.
 

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For years I had a Glock 19. I limp wristed and locked it up quite a few times. I was pretty disappointed to say the least. I have not had this problem with any other guns...ever
 

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Two other myths expelled!
1) Glocks work (as noted above) :biglaugh:
2) Many others wont. :)

Good work! :rock:
 

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Full-auto,

I just thought of something. I was wondering if the glock failures were due to limpwristing? I would like to see a control experiment. Can you repeat the glock test with a standard grip so that we can show that the failures seen in the video are indeed due to limpwristing and not due to some other artefact? Just curious.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Full-auto,

I just thought of something. I was wondering if the glock failures were due to limpwristing? I would like to see a control experiment. Can you repeat the glock test with a standard grip so that we can show that the failures seen in the video are indeed due to limpwristing and not due to some other artefact? Just curious.
If you're asking if the Glock doesn't work or is broken, it's not. That Glock gets shot regularly and works quite well in extreme conditions like this:



It failed to feed because of the way it was being held and fired.
 

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This was very enlightening.
Perhaps now whenever a post trying to diagnose a FTE/FTF or other feeding problem (other than a Glock) there won't be the 'limp-wrist' diagnosis from those wannabees.
 

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So the Glock does work well in the control and does everything it's reputation states, but just won't work with a wimpy grip.
 

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Many thanks for the test and showing of them.
The first time I fired the G27 I experienced failures. The guy who owned mentioned that I must be limp wristing it. When I held it in an iron grip it functioned flawlessly. I was using, if I recall correctly, Win 180 gr ammo. I have subsequently fired three other G 27s and never experienced the problem. Maybe the heavier weight bullets made the difference as I have not used them again.

My G26 has never had a problem, but I have not intentionally limp wristed it.

Best,
Jerry
 

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Discussion Starter #17
...an interesting article:

Limp Wristing: The New Gremlin
6-Dec-07 – 03:10 by ToddG

I can’t tell you how many times I’ve seen a shooter, instructor, or firearms “expert” blame a malfunction on limp wristing. Please, just stop.

Limp wristing is the gun industry’s version of gremlins. Gremlins, if you don’t know, were first “discovered” by pilots in the 1920’s. They are mischievous little mythical creatures. Every time an aircraft developed an unexplainable problem, it was blamed on a gremlin. If a plane crashed and no one knew why … a gremlin brought it down.

Well today, every time a pistol experiences a stoppage or malfunction that can’t be attributed to the ammo, certain gun companies immediately blame the shooter by saying he was “limp wristing.” It’s a catch-all that means absolutely nothing. It just pushes blame onto the shooter rather than admitting that guns sometimes malfunction.

A gun needs to work, and it needs to work particularly well when a shooter is under stress. So if there is a gun that requires a perfect grip, a gun that will only work if the shooter’s wrists are locked just right every single shot, then that is a bad gun design! Expecting a shooter to be perfect under stress is ridiculous. A gun design that requires perfect technique under stress is just as ridiculous.

We know that we won’t be perfect under stress. Our gear needs to keep working.

So the next time you or a student experiences a stoppage, don’t immediately blame the shooter. Guns malfunction. It happens. I’ve carried some of the most famously reliable guns, and they’ve had stoppages, malfunctions, parts breakages. It happens. Accept it, learn to clear the problem when it comes up, and drive on. But stop blaming gremlins.

Because either the pistol stopped working on its own, or it’s so finicky that you can’t rely on it when you’re under stress … Either way, the gun is at fault, not the shooter.

Train hard & stay safe! ToddG
Source: http://pistol-training.com/archives/82
 

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Nicely Done! I'm a Glocker and can anecdotally confirm your experiment.

I've been shooting my G-17 for years with only a single handful of failures. Then I took the wifey and another couple to the range. The girls had jam after jam. In the guy's hands, the gun ran flawlessly. In the girl's: nothing but trouble. Can a gun be misogynistic?

The range pro diagnosed the problem as limp wresting. His suggestions helped, but did not completely eliminate the problem.

I can see now why the wifey likes her wheelguns.
 

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Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
Does the fact that the Glock is Compensated have anything to do with it jamming every time?
Read what others have posted, the answer is no. Anyway, why would a compensator make much of a difference? If anything, it would reduce the tendency of the muzzle to jump and aid in getting it to work properly.

In reality, it probably makes little or no difference.
 
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