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Discussion Starter #1
In the past few months ive had the chance to inspect a few pre series 70 "C" suffix guns, a few 70 series guns, and lately a few of the most recent 1991 and XSE guns.

The "C" suffix commercials were all fantastic. The examples i saw were fired very little and were unmodified etc... All were well done and seem to have alot of hand fit and hand work done by competent employess at Colt in the 60's (one was a 61, one a 65). These were very very nice guns fit/finish and even internal finish was good to very good.

The 70 series guns (3 govts., 2 combat commanders) were a bit different. These were all 95%+ guns, unmodified. There didnt seem to be any consistencey in quality overall. 1 gun would be good with very little tooling marks, good roll marks etc.. The next would have a very light to partial roll mark... While the next would have what appeared to be tooling "gouges" internally. 1 looked like it was put together by a monkey with a mallet. Ive lost some of my reverance for the 70 series guns, as i think you must be very picky when you choose one for a safe queen or a shooter. Dont get me wrong, i still like them and will have a gun or two built based on them, but again watch them close when before you pay that hard earned cash for one.

As far as the "new" guns, from what ive seen of all the "80" series guns the new 1991 and XSE guns are the best. The most recent ones had nice crisp lines seperating the round/flats, and seemed to be fit ok. Although i dont like the goofy 80 series "safety" parts, i wouldnt hesitate to have a current production XSE or 1991 for a shooter. Matter of fact if i wanted a SS gun, the XSE would be my first choice. I kinda like the roll mark, and as stated earlier and in other postes the flat/round lines are good and straight/square and distinct.

So all in all, If it werent for the 80 series "safety" parts, my favorite Colt would be a current production XSE.

Thats my thoughts on it.
 

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The problem with Colt was the rotating ownership. Quality was up and down through the years. IIRC, the current owner's took over around 96 and Colt started getting better and better. The problem being that they're still in debt, and trying to upgrade their machinery while making product.
Heck, through it's long history, Colt was almost always a supplier to the military, now they probably make more money on their civilian end.
 

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I think your making a mistake. I think the pre XS 80 Government. Is far and away the best of any 1911 gun. Second is a tossup between a 97 to 00 Trophy S/S. And a 32 to 41 National Match or Special Combat(any).
 

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Discussion Starter #4
you can think im making a mistake thats ok. the "c" prefix guns, such as the 32-41 are much softer (went to a different heat treat on the "c" suffix).

from about 97 to current ive owned at least 12 1991's and Enhanced Govt's. None of them were close to the current quality as far as the finish and especially lines between flat/round. Most of the later ones, up until very recent had basically no clear line between flat/round and this is a pet peave of mine.

I guess its what you like, but to say that im making a "mistake" in prefering what i do is pointless.
 

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I think I'm bothered by cosmetic anomalies more than anybody else here. On Colts made during the 90's I saw cocking serrations that didn't match from one side to the other, severe slide/dust cover rubbing, and mis-shaped trigger guards. Happily, I haven't seen any of those on recent Colts.
 

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I have a c1990 Delta Elite and a 1998 M1991A1, and neither of them displays any of the "problems" that people claim for/associate with Colt production from the '90s. For people who have guns with indistinct flats, rubbing between slide and frame, etc.; why did you buy the gun?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
RickB, dont know if it were directed at me, but ive never bought one i didnt like. Always had the oppurtunity to check on things that bother me before i purchase,

that i think is the key to buying any gun.
 

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Let me reiterate, I chaecked spellcheck and as usual i'm correct. I was talking pre enhanced also. Though i'm not disenchanted with the enhanced. It was'nt the gun I was refering too.
 

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I also want to add I think your incorrect on the heat treating improvment. I was doing some research, as my memory is'nt always good. But on dsk's site I notice it was during the period between I and II. I think I can safely say 32 to 41 are in there. From what I remember reading from Clasons book. It was during the late 20s that the improvment was integrated to production.
 

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Redzone-

Around the mid-20's Colt began hardening the front of the slide to resist wear. I don't know the exact date, but the 1924 Transitional Models didn't have the hardened slide but my 1928 Argentine Contract does. Then in mid-1943 they also began to spot-treat the slide stop notch area as well. It wasn't until after WW2 though that the Austempering method was introduced, which hardened the entire slide thus reducing wear to the breech face and locking lugs as well.

RickB, regarding the issue of buying guns with cosmetic quirks, it was always a case of not being aware of it until I brought it home, then suddenly looking at the gun and saying "whatinhellizzat?". Usually I'd sell that gun in a hurry, like-new and unfired!
 
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