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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just got a new to me SW1911. I took it out to shoot earlier today and after some shots the ambidextrous thumb safety would be raised up slightly, enough that it wouldn't allow the trigger to be pulled. By moving my hands lower, it seemed to alleviate the problem. However, this shouldn't be happening.

I'm fairly new to 1911s, but I do have a Springfield EMP which also has the same safety set up and don't have this problem.

Any advice? Thanks in advance for the help, I really appreciate it.
 

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The plunger should be fitted into a detent that prevents accidental movement but allows the safety to be snicked easily ON or OFF.


Your plunger may be misfitted, have a weak spring, or the safety itself may have been improperly fitted/cut.
 

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Consider using the high thumbs forward hand hold.



LOG
 

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The part about moving your hands further down the butt solved the problem is the clue. What's happening is during recoil your thumb is just slightly bumping the underside of the safety level.

By riding the top of the level you both prevent this and grip the gun higher, allowing better control.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks everybody, I suspected that it was partially due to my hold of the gun. I just was unsure because I've never that the problem with my EMP.

PS Log, can I send you my EMP mags in January?
 

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My hand hold is so high my weak hand can put the safety on. My strong thumb can't rest on the lever because my other hand is higher than the lever.

There are some things you can do. Sharpen the detent a little so that it falls into the notch better. Reprofile the safety so that the detent is slightly deeper. Stronger (new) pluger spring and finally if all else fails, replace the rear plunger with a cut down sear pin. Make it .050 to .070 thou longer than the original plunger. The diameter is the same. Obviously it won't have the small bit to fit into the spring, unless you make it. It's really only there to prevent loss during disassembly of the safety.
 

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Every pistol course I've been in that covers the M1911 stresses the need to keep your thumb on top of the frame safety at all times. Prevents this problem as well as allows instant shooting just by pushing down on the safety (and pulling the trigger) and not fuming for the lever.

-- Chuck
 

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Every pistol course I've been in that covers the M1911 stresses the need to keep your thumb on top of the frame safety at all times. Prevents this problem as well as allows instant shooting just by pushing down on the safety (and pulling the trigger) and not fumbling for the lever.

-- Chuck
 

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My safety is thumbed off as soon as the muzzle clears the holster (and my weak hand). Don't need to ride the safety if it functions right, and fits the users hand. If it doesn't have a very positive click, it can be tuned to do so.

Also, I don't use Ambi safeties anymore. My index knuckle can knock the safety on and they are more likely to break than single sided. In fact, I've only seen ambi's break. Even the machined from billet SVI safeties.
 

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Several techniques work. Taking the extra step to move my thumb off the safety and position it below it is counter productive for me. While it seemed foreign to me originally I now keep my thumb on top of the lever at all times. Modern levers are much easier than the original design.

Logman's photo shows the technique taught in most good schools. I'm a Modern Technique guy although I've been to several courses that think they have a better method. :eek:

That's a major benefit of taking these courses. Do it the instructor's way, even if it's wrong. You'll then be able to make your own decision as to what works best for you. The shooting techniques that the very best shooters use very often (if not mostly) don't translate well unless you shoot thousands of rounds a week like they do and have company armorers maintain your weapons.

KISS is the best advice for most of us. No point in moving my thumb after I've snicked the safety off with my grip in the holster. :)

-- Chuck
 

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My hand hold is so high my weak hand can put the safety on. My strong thumb can't rest on the lever because my other hand is higher than the lever.
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I have a similar issue with my trigger finger flipping the safety up (lefty). What I've done, is deepen the detent on the safety so the lever is quite difficult to flip up; even if I don't have firm downward pressure from my thumb, the intermittent upward pressure from my finger won't budge the safety.
 

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My hand hold is so high my weak hand can put the safety on. My strong thumb can't rest on the lever because my other hand is higher than the lever.

.
:biglaugh:I sure would like to see a picture of this descriptive grip. Really!:biglaugh:

LOG
 

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Bandit,

It isn't your hold on the gun. That thing was designed for one hand use and does it well.

Don't get all wrapped up in gamesmanship technique of hold and stance just yet. Respectfully, getting a grip on sight alignment, trigger control, and follow through before you get into pistol grip and stance might serve you better.

If you deepen and enlarge the divot, the problems will stop. Go easy. Finesse is a good thing. It will require more force to engage the safety after the divot is enlarged. If you have an ambi safety with a fragile tounge in groove attachment, more force might not a good idea.

I had to make the same decision as you. I replaced the ambi lash-up on my Baer with a single side safety. Les Baer, understanding gent that he is, refused to swap safetys w/o me shipping the Commanche/Commander back.

Since reliability trumps all, it wasn't a difficult decision to go with a single side safety from Brownells. I am not left handed so the ambi wasn't needed.

Maybe that helps,

salty
 
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