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Discussion Starter #1
I purchased a Wilson Titanium firing pin for my Charles Daly. I installed it as I was concerned that the parts of this pistol are cast or something to that effect. I went to the range and ran 50 rounds through it. It worked very well indeed. Anyone here have any good or bad info on these type parts? any help or thoughts are appreciated, Thanks.

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Titanium parts will wear much faster than steel. IMHO, they are for race guns where shaving a 1/10 of a second means the difference between winning and losing. The lighter weight, when combined with other weight-reduced internal components, can make the difference on a competition gun. I would not recommend any light weight, faster wearing (read - breakable) parts on a carry/self-defense weapon.
 

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Yep, Shane has it right.

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the info. I guess I'll keep an eye on it for wear. Is there anything in particular to watch for signs of possible failure?
 

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Originally posted by shane45-1911:
Titanium parts will wear much faster than steel. IMHO, they are for race guns where shaving a 1/10 of a second means the difference between winning and losing. The lighter weight, when combined with other weight-reduced internal components, can make the difference on a competition gun. I would not recommend any light weight, faster wearing (read - breakable) parts on a carry/self-defense weapon.
So should I be concerned about my Champion
or think about replacing the stock Ti pin?

Mac
 

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Shane is correct like a LOT of things (good and bad that come from competition)

I "think" the reason your seeing Ti firing pin is the drop test in ca. The sample we had in last week had a ti pin and a safety in the main sprin housing. the safety made the top cap longer. If they are using the same main spring? made the Main (hammer) spring very heavy. This will wear on the MIM hamme and sear faster. (the origional springfield sear is a good part)

Ti firing pins are 40% lighter than there steel counterparts. that means the hit with 40% less force. In race guns in super and 40 they caused light hits. Not a goal. to make up for it Springfield is using heavier main springs, which makes the trigger worse.


Funny thing is the firing pin travels about .040 ish to set the gun off. So how much faster does a pin hit with a hammer move???

Ti hammers were a looser the disconector track cut through the head. Struts and main spring housing caps seem fine.
geo ><>
 

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Originally posted by cwm1150:
Thanks for the info. I guess I'll keep an eye on it for wear. Is there anything in particular to watch for signs of possible failure?
Yep! A broken firing pin tip!
 

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I've been kinda studying the light firing pin thing over the last few years. I believe that a lightweight firing train consisting of a Ti mainspring cap (I even drill them sometimes for an additional .00000000032 seconds off the lock time!), Ti hammer strut, and lightened (but not Ti) hammer, is a good thing. I have proven to my own satisfaction that this makes for a more postitive primer strike. I have observed some cases where a Ti firing pin seemed to cause misfires. I guess we're sorta back to the old bullet controversy-- slow and heavy or light and fast? I would agree with the above, on a carry gun a Ti fp may not be the best way to go. The only misfires I have experienced with one in .45 was with some of this Brasilian ammo going around-- but I had none in the same lot of ammo with a few other guns without Ti fp's. Not definitive but enough to start making me wonder. Had the same in a 10/22 where I holed and lightened the bejeesus out of the fp.... it misdired with some ammo.

Now on a few Remington 700's, I have lightened the striker and in one case made a striker from aluminum and Ti, for a weight reduction to 205 grains total from, as I recall, 630. Dry firing this rifle, it now goes >tik< instead of !!duh-WHACK!!. There have been a few misfires, but with older, milsurp ammo.

My rough conclusion, subject to change as I gather more data and info, is that a light firing pin may not contribute to a harder strike, inless maybe it is the actual striker, with the striker spring driving it. When it is a separate component that needs to be set in motion by a hammer blow, I think it will lighten the strike. I believe that the lighter firing train from the hammer down, on a 1911, will deliver a harder blow to the fp. I have also sorta proven this with an admittedly jerry-rigged testing proceedure that measures fp force somewhat like a Rockwell tester.

I like to get one set up thusly next to a stocker and show people the dif in sound when they are dry-fired; heck, you can even see it in the speed of the hammer drop.
 

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Originally posted by Ned Christiansen:
I believe that a lightweight firing train consisting of a Ti mainspring cap (I even drill them sometimes for an additional .00000000032 seconds off the lock time


LOL Ned


My biggest concern with Ti parts is NOT the lighter mass = less reliable ignition (which I don't think is true), but the problem with the increased wear factor involved. This is especially true with TiN (titanium nitride coatings). Once the gold anodized coating wears away, you will find that generally, the part underneath the coating is made of Play-doh.
 

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I haven't seen much of a wear problem, but can't really say that I look at a certain gun and can say, "OK, that's this much wear in this many rounds..." . That info isn't really reliably available on any but my own. I've probably got 2-3,000 rounds on one gun w/ TI mainspg cap, fp, and strut, not really a long-term test yet.

Titanium like Play-Do.... yeah, till ya try to make somethin' out of it ;-) !
 

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Im with Ned here
6AL 4V makes up over 90 % of ti sold.
it runs 37 rc, it is not machine friendly.

Light hits and flow back are a factor in super 9x23 and 40. Have seen erosion on ti
pin tips, which I have not seen on steel
geo ><>
 

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George, I just replaced most of the "new and improved" parts in my new SA 9mm 1911. Got rid of the MS housing with the funky top cap and the titanium firing pin. The hammer is not the best I have seen, but the sear was usable.I was able to get a nice crisp 2 1/2 lb. pull. Went with a lighter (20 lb.) hammer spring to save a little wear on the hammer and to allow an increase in the recoil spring weight to speed up the cycle time a bit. This is obviously a competition gun, not a carry gun.
 
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