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if im a total 100% newb at trying to reload whats a good place to get started? and maybe some recomendations of what and where to buy equiptment

i dont want to limit myself to .45's either. i have a 500sw thats pretty expensive to keep feed too. ive been keeping all my brass too just in case i ever wanted to reload it or sell to a reloader

but ya, id pretty much be starting from scratch, just watched a few vids on youtube. i consider myself a pretty mechanically inclined person capable of doing delicate work.

thanks for any advice
 

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For pistol and smaller rifle calibers, I would recommend the Lee Anniversary kit.
It is a decent product for the money and has most of the items you will need to get started.

A couple more items you will need for reloading pistol calibers:
Dies for the caliber that you are going to load, I would recommend a 4-die carbide set. $40
Dial calipers $20
Safety glasses $5
Brass tumbler with media and polish. $80 You can use a liquid case cleaner that will get them pretty clean but it doesn't polish them like the tumbler does. Polishing makes the cases smoother and easier to size.
A good book to get is the ABC's of Reloading.

You will also need brass, powder, primers, and bullets. Not all of those are easy to come by these days but it's getting better.
 

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How much do you shoot and how much time do you have to devote to reloading?

A single stage press is the least expensive way to get into reloading. It's also the slowest. Unless you are retired you are not going to be cranking a whole lot of ammo out of a single stage press.

Next up the line is a turrent press. Quicker than a single stage since you rotate the turrent and work the handle. For many shooters a turrent is a great compromise between speed and cost.

Next up are the progressive presses. A progressive press produces a round for each pull of the lever. There are two types of progressive presses. Manual indexing and auto indexing.

I own a Hornady Lock-N-Load AP which is a auto indexing progressive press. It has other features that make it my choice. It uses standard dies in bushings. So once I set up a die set for a load I don't have to reset the dies. I remove them from the press and put new dies in.

The other day I switched from .45 ACP to 10mm on the press. It took all of two minutes to make the switch. All I needed to do was swap the shell plate. Swap the dies. Insert rotor into powder measure. Adjust lock-out die and then start loading.

If I switch between small and large primers it takes another couple of minutes.

Your choice of press is going to have some effect on the rest of your needs. I use an RCBS lock-out die on my progressive press. With a single stage press a lock-out die would be about as useful as a bicycle would be to a fish.
 

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Yes, the Lee reloading kits are great for beginners, cept I would get a Turret kit instead of a single stage. Loading pistols requires 3 or 4 dies and the Turret.press really speeds things up.

If you have the cash I would upgrade from the Lee Turret kit to a Redding, RCBS or Lyman. The Lee press is good, but the scale and powder measure are kinda flimsy and you may want to upgrade later.

The first thing I would buy is a manual. The Lyman 48 or 49 are great . Get one and read the whole thing before you buy your equipment.

Here is a little primer on staring out.

http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=238214
 

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I started out 7 months ago and got by as cheap as I could not knowing any better. For the last 2 months I've been replacing with quality equipment. Point being, buy the good stuff first and you will buy it once. Single, turret, or progressive, buy the best you can afford.
 

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Following up on Madpap's comments. I strongly recommend the Dillon RL 550. It's a progressive reloading machine, very reliable, durable and with the best "no BS" warranty in the business.
It may be a little bit more expensive, but you get what you pay for.
Here's a link to Brian Enos' web site, where you can shop around and decide on what accessories you need.
Good luck and welcome to the world of reloading.

http://www.brianenos.com/store/dillon.ez.550.html
 

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I just went through the same thing. I did tons research and reading on this and other forums.
I would rather buy quality once and be happy with it as buy something decent and have to replace it down the road.
Everyone has an opinion but most people on here will chime in with Dillon 550 or Hornady LnL AP.
I think starting with a cheaper kit is fine if you are financially strapped but if you can swing it, The dillon and the hornady need some serious consideration.
After talking to a couple people who had both presses, it seems the honady was the favorite. It seems folks like the spring shell holder, the die bushing system and the half indexing a bit better. They say the primer feed is better also but I had some trouble at first........ all fixed now though.
Anyway, thats what I wound up with was the Hornady LnL AP. I love it! I'm a bit slow compared to some of these videos I see but I think I'm just being careful.
Hornady has a great deal through the end of the year also. You get 1000 free bullets with the press and another 100 with the dies. Thats about a $270 rebate if you buy retail one box at a time. If you have your own brass, by the time you shoot those 1100 bullets verses buying store bought ammo, you've more than paid for the press.
In the end though, everybody makes their own decision for their own reason........ Good luck.
 

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I agree with Rod on his choice for reloading. The 1000 bullets is a deal breaker. I would go with the lee carbide pistol dies the four die set.
Lucky
 

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I still say if you are just starting out go with single stage. You will learn exactly what and why you are doing things. The single stage press will still benefit you after you move up to a progressive. I have a RCBS reloader special press( got it used) I also have a RCBS rock chucker press( got it for free). I am not a high volume shooter but I will get a progresive in the next year. I am in no rush. I make great ammo and I learned alot in the last year and a half.

You can piece together a set up from e bay/for sale boards on gun forums and if you get good stuff it will carry over to your progressive set up. I am leaning towars the LNL progressive. I can use all the stuff I have an not waste any money.

Most of all start off with a good book. The ABC's of reloading is great.
 

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I shoot over 1000 rounds a month. So i use the Dillon 650xl. But if you are only doing 45acp try lee hand loading. This will give you more respect for reloading thus less likely to make mistakes when going automated.
 

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if im a total 100% newb at trying to reload whats a good place to get started? and maybe some recomendations of what and where to buy equiptment

i dont want to limit myself to .45's either. i have a 500sw thats pretty expensive to keep feed too. ive been keeping all my brass too just in case i ever wanted to reload it or sell to a reloader

but ya, id pretty much be starting from scratch, just watched a few vids on youtube. i consider myself a pretty mechanically inclined person capable of doing delicate work.

thanks for any advice
You have many choices available to you when it comes to Handloading equipment.

The first thing you may wish to consider is acquiring a reasonable knowledge base.
I.E. reading manuals

Almost all will provide the needed tutelage but if I had to recommend (1) it would be the Lyman.
Besides all the basics, learning about how powder, primers, cases and bullets work together the Lyman has tons of lead load data you can use.

Reading the manual several times in advance of your equipment purchase may be an advantage to you. It may help you make a wiser choice for your needs.
I learned how to handload as a kid helping my Dad, which was over 40 years ago.

We loaded then on a single stage rig, it worked as designed and advertised but moving forward 40 years I have to be honest and say I cannot recommend going this route if a better option is available and there is.

Many folks believe and rightfully so that you learn and understand the handloading process better using the single stage.
This may in actuality be true, maybe not
For many back in the day, the option was not available to even compare. Either from an availability, or cost factor.

Few if any schools teach long division math anymore, if you look into the reason why its simple. There is no need to for the greater public to use this skill anymore.
We have (The public at large and generation of today) calculators surrounding us.
There in out cell phones, computers, wristwatches, and even our cars!
It really is the buggy whip analogy.

You can fully learn the “proper” handloading techniques on a progressive as well as a single stage unit.
The manufacturers and handloading scholars planned for this.
Its all in the books and manuals.
You just have to use your brain a bit.

Buy what you want but as said before buy as much quality as you can afford, it will serve you well in the future.
Maybe an auto-indexing progressive might be a bit much unless you have a demand for the higher output, either way it will serve you well.

I’m biased as I have (2) 550 Dillon machines that do everything I need to get done on the press.
These are progressives that manually index and are very civilized to operate.
Dillon, Hornady and others make faster auto indexing presses, do the research and you will find the one that best suites your demand.
Just buy enough press as if you stick with the pastime many find they outgrow lesser equipment quickly

Besides, if you plan on loading for that S&W 500 monster you will need a press with grit.
And remember, try and stick to one case type, Hornady still makes these for Large Pistol primers, most everyone else (starline for example) are using the Large Rifle primer case.
This is the preferred 500 case to use in my opinion.
You do not want to get these mixed up together.

Good Luck :)

I load for the 500 on my press, it is an excellent cartridge to load for on the press.
Here is a photo of the 500 and some lesser cartridges I load for

(L to R)500 S&WMAG 460 S&WMAG 454 Casull 44 Rem Mag (How’d that wimpy 44 get in here :scratch:).
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
thanks for al the advice. ya i guess i have alot of reading to do. probably wont actually lay out any investments till the spring.

loading for the 500 really is my biggest motivation

i have a good amout of time to devote and im not looking to put out 100s of rounds a day so i can live with a slower process
 
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