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Question for you experts out there.
Last week I loaded 100 rnds and went to the range. This is subjective, but the load felt "hot". Snappy recoil and found one case, the spot where the primer was struck by the firing pin was sticking out.A few others seemed to have the breach face embosed on the primer.
I was using info off Midways loadmap booklet.
Supposibly I was loading under the maximum in Midways book.

This is what I used.

230 gr Magtech bullets,
W231 5.7 gr,
various brass seated OAL 1.250-1.255 depending on the brass.
Light taper crimp.

I used this same combo before except W231 5.3gr and it felt much milder.
According to midways loadmap I should been a few steps under max. Guess I better go back to 5.3 W231.
I was using a Combat Commander and a CZ97b.

Anyone else use a similar load?
What do you guys think?

thanks
John
 

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sound like definant pressure signs on your primers, all reloading manuels state to start low and work up your powder loads, and check for pressure signs. if all your shooting is paper, stay with a lighter load, you and your gun will last a lot longer. if not increase your powder charge at 2/10 grain intervals and look for pressure signs.
 

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In my trusty Winchester reloading pamphlet, 5.7 grains of 231 is the max charge. In my Speer reloading book, 6.2 is max for 231. My personal favorite is 5.2 grains of 231. Those loads are based on a 230 grain FMJ bullet. In the Speer reloading book 13th edition starting on page 50, there is discussion of primers and their appearance after firing. Let us know what you learn!

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Originally posted by John-C:
the spot where the primer was struck by the firing pin was sticking out.
This is called "primer flow" and it a definite sign of overpressure. The pressure inside the case forces the brass back against the breech wall, and the primer starts to "bleed" back around the firing pin as it contacts the primer during ignition.
 

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...You must remember that all pistols are not created equally...Start low and build up...You could always have a NEW problem that you just haven't discovered 'til you start pushin' loads up closer to Max Pressure...
Take your time and cross-check your loads...There are plenty of places on the web if you don't have more than 1 manual...I think almost all the powder manufacturers have a site with load info for all of their powders...Try some of those or do a "Google Search" for reloading pistols or something...
Be Careful...



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John-C, I use that same round myself, 5.7gr W231, 230gr FMJ (mine are Remington), CCI Lg Pistol primers, mixed brass. I've seen no signs of excess pressure. Average speed of mine is 789 feet/second out of a 5" 1911. The symptoms you describe do indeed sound like what I've read with respect to high pressure. I think you may be seating your bullets a little too deep. My LoadMAP indicates an overall cartridge length of 1.275", and my Speer #13 Manual specifies 1.270". I started out with 1.275", but they would not fit in my magazines. I've finally settled on 1.265 - 1.270". From what I've read, decreases in overall length will raise pressure. You might try increasing overall length, and see what happens.
 

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One way to get pressure much too high is for bullets to seat deeper when feeding into the chamber. Try pushing a few of your rounds HARD nose first on your bench. If you can seat the bullets deeper manually, your pistol can do it too, and pressure can get dangerous in a hurry.
 

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You are right at the ragged edge. Back off a couple tenths and see how it looks. Look at the primer's shape - it is probably flattened by the pressure. You can see the flattening by comparing to an unfired round. Look at the radius at the outer edge of the primer.

Note that pressures can vary depending on a lot of things, including the brass you use.

The above advice about checking the crimp strength is good. Make sure that bullet can't back into the case.

With all that said you are very close to what I consider my max load.

[This message has been edited by JiminCA (edited 08-06-2001).]
 

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Just curious...What was the ambient temperature?

Did you have your ammo stored in a hot car for any length of time?

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Check your scale, Readjust your powder measure. Always work up a load, I load no more than ten each before moving up the charge. Then when you find a good combo you can test it in bulk..I hate pullin or wasting good components..
 

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I have a midway load map also. I forget exactly what load I was working up at the time but I had noticed that the published maximum load recommended by Sierra, Nosler, and various other major component manufactures was significantly lower than what midway stated as a maximum load. I tend to believe that companies such as Sierra and Nosler are a much more reliable source of information than Midway. The ballistics laboratories at Sierra and Nosler are state of the art and their knowledge is much more extensive than Midway's. I would recommend following the loadings that Nosler and Sierra specify. Also the lighter loads are easier on your gun. As someone has already mentioned, you should also start low and work your loads up to maximum checking for pressure signs as you go.

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The way I check for bullet set back is to load 3-5 rounds, fill up the mag, insert in gun and cycle the rounds by hand vigerously, pulling the slide back to the extent of its travel and let your hand continue back slipping off the slide so that there is no resistance to forward slide travel and let the spring pressure only cycle the slide forward. this will let the gun do what it can to seat your bullet deeper in the case.
Of course, measure the OAL of your rounds before and after cycling thru the gun. If any of them are even the least little bit shorter than before they were cycled, you either need less belling of the case mouth, or more tapercrimp.
I've taken 230 gr bullets all the way up to 6.0 gr of ww-231 with no pressure signs in my Colt and Glock 21.
Like was posted above, if your ammo has been exposed to sunlight for extended periods or stored in a hot enviroment, it can affect the powder and cause raised pressures.

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks all for your replies.
Yes it has been hot here. Over 100, but my reloads were in the car, air conditioned.
Might have been the seating depth, I also have a pretty solid taper crimp on them. I don't think they would have seated any deeper.
Not all of my rounds had the primer pressure signs and when I think about it my first 10 rounds or so were AOL of 1.24-1.245.
Then I raised the die to seat about 1.25-1.255. Might have been those first few giving me the primer troubles.
I think I'll try to settle for somewhere between
5.3 -5.7 of W231 and seated 1.26. Then I'll see where I'm at.
thanks again gang,
John
 
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