1911Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
took my trp apart need parts {update pics}

well my trp is my fisrt 1911, and only my second hadgun, so i was bored last night and said this would be sweet if i could polish the triger. plus the magwell had to go and the ils, anyway ive never took a gun apart before, i only broke 2 parts the bottom of the msh had studs that connected it the the magwell they broke when i hit the magwell to get it off, then the mag release i didnt know that you had to push the button in before it would turn, so that screw is messed up. oh and how do you get the plunger tube off, so i polished the trigger, slide stop, last night im going to do the grip saftey and safety today. know for the parts what lb# mainspring should i get, should i get a recoil buffer, and i dvd or book to put this back together, alot of the parts just fell out as i was taking it apart. ill post pics of the polished parts today when i get them all done.

ok polished the trigger, ambi saftey, slide stop, grip screws and grip saftey.
now i want to do something with the plunger tube( but dont how to get it off), i orderd a ed brown blued one, also ordered, ed brown frame rebuild kit blued, ed brown mag release with oversized button blued, ed brown recoil buffers, and a 19lb mainspring, and also a wilson combat msh and magwell blued with 20lpi checkering. the ed brown one i wanted was on backorder. i used a bench buffer with a 8inch buffing wheel, started with rough then medium and fine compounds, then rubed them out by hand with mothers polish which is great stuff if anyone needs polish anything for just about any metal.



 

·
Registered
Joined
·
556 Posts
Not sure why you'd want to polish the trigger on TRP, but ok. As far as taking the plunger tube off, DON'T. It's staked to the frame, work it loose trying to take it off and you're going to have serious problems trying to use the safety.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Revolver Ocelot said:
Not sure why you'd want to polish the trigger on TRP, but ok. As far as taking the plunger tube off, DON'T. It's staked to the frame, work it loose trying to take it off and you're going to have serious problems trying to use the safety.
oh i didnt know it was going to be that hard to take off, im leaving the trigger compents alone just polishing the finish of the trigger, i always liked the look of a polished trigger. and nice to see a metal gear fan, how bout
MGS4 looking pretty crazy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,545 Posts
madblazer

Please do not do any more "Work" to your pistol. At this point in your knowledge base it is very likely that you will damage something and make your pistol unsafe to handle.

In addition to the link Jim Watson gave you, you need the following references.

1. Bill Wilson's book and video detailing the disassembly and reassembly of a 1911 pistol. These are available from the Wilson Combat website for a reasonable cost. They are well done with clear instructions and images. The book also details all of the tools needed to disassemble a 1911 pistol.

2. Jerry Kuhnhausen's book, "The Colt .45 Automatic, A Shop Manual." This book is available from Brownells, the Shotgun News, and possibly the Wilson Combat website. This book explains how to do gunsmith work to a 1911 pistol.

Until you are familiar with your pistol, its components, and how it operates, it is best that you do not make any changes until you can assemble and disassemble your pistol without using any references. Also, FYI, the plunger tube is not supposed to be removed, doing so will destroy it.

Also, you should take your disassembled pistol back to the store where you bought it, or to a gunsmith, show them the parts you polished and ask if they can tell if they should be replaced. They will also be able to show you how to reassemble your pistol, and recommend replacement springs. A well stocked store may have these items in stock. If they do not, they can get them for you.

Finally, when your pistol is reassembled (with the original parts or new parts) and take it to the range, do not load more than two (2) rounds in the magazine until you have proven that the action (hammer, sear, disconnector, and trigger) components are in good condition. I do this by first loading two rounds and shooting them, I repeat for a total of 5 times, then I increase to three rounds, then four, up to five. Once I have done this and the pistol works properly every time, then I will load a full magazine. If there are any failures, problems, or things don't work or even look right, stop shooting, unload the pistol, and either return the pistol to Springfield or take it to a gunsmith.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
699 Posts
Why ditch the magwell? Magwells kick ass, I put on a S&A one-piece version for the blockier corner at the bottom. Should I ever get in a close quarters battle (yeah right) and run out of bullets (I better not miss) I can really hurt someones feelings wackin them with the butt of the pistol.

These guys are absolutely correct though, you may have done something dangerous, or damaged your cool-ass TRP. I'm thinking send it back to Springfield, and next time, have them do the customizing you have in mind, they're the experts. Cant fault you for wanting to hot-rod though, been there and done that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
78 Posts
DOH!!!

I took mine all the way apart a few weeks ago. When i put it back together, i accidentally put the sear spring UNDER the disconnector, then, when trying to fix it, i couldn't get the thumb safety off, but then i did, and it was easy from there. I eventually got it back together properly, but i didn't break anything (thank god). It's amazing how so few parts could potentially cause so much damage, interesting piece of machinery.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
480 Posts
By the look of it you only polished the external surfaces of the parts in question so I'm assuming you left the critical engagement surfaces alone ex. sear, disconnecter, hammer. I personally would not remove the plunger tube as you will have to restake a new one in place. Get you a manual on how to put the thing back together and study it well, order the parts you broke from Springfield and be careful. I let Wilson Combat do all my "serious work" but the Springfield Custom shop is more than capable, I know enough about the 1911 to know I don't know enough and don't trust myself to work on the internals, best left to the pro's.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27,694 Posts
Your boredom probably just cost you several hundred dollars.....
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top