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Hi All,

I am in the processing of making some minor mods to my 1911 (fitting a safety, fitting a trigger, etc.). I have some jeweller's files that I use to remove metal, and some larger honing stones in various coarseness grades to dress metal parts. However, I would like to purchase some smaller honing stones that I can use to dress/modify small parts (for example, like enlarging the slot on my thumb safety as discussed in the following thread, http://forums.1911forum.com/showthread.php?p=1682451).

What kind of honing stones do you use to dress/modify small parts? I'd probably like some flat thin ones that I could use for the slotted parts. Where do you buy your honing stones from? I took a look at Brownell's website, and saw some stones they had for modifying the sears/hammers, etc., but they were pretty pricey. Any suggestions?

Thanks in advance.
 

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Brownells has some stones with a "knife edge" that tapers from thick to thin. You have to be careful though, that thin edge is brittle.

For enlarging the thumb saftey slot however, I have found a small flat mini file works well.
 

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I have a lot of knives, too...

I like to use old ceramic knife sharpening stones I don't use any more or those that dropped and broke in two pieces. I also like the Lansky stones that come with the color coded handles; particularly the yellow super fine. The handles make it real easy to hold on to when polishing / stoning.
 

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IMHO, you don't really need to use stones on the inside of the lug on your safety. When you activate the safety, your thumb will push it into the frame, so the only area that will drag is the main panel. I use my set of needle files from Nicholson. They come in 5 shapes in a red and clear vinyl bag for like $12 at Lowes/Home Depot. I've had them for a few years now and they leave a pretty smooth finish.

As far as the part of the lug that touches the sear, I get it close with my needle files, then switch to my Norton fine arkansas stone untill it engages with some force. I finish it with a Brownells x-fine ceramic stone until it slides into place with a slight push.

For dressing sears and hammer hooks I only use 2 stones. I use a fine arkansas stone to cut the primary angle on the sear, then polish it up with an x-fine ceramic stone. For the secondary angle I just use the arkansas stone. The hammer hooks are squared with a hammer hook squaring file, then the fine arkansas stone, and lastly with the x-fine ceramic.

Make sure to use honing oil. The ceramic stones can be lubed with water but I still prefer honing oil. And buy some chalk for the files. It makes a significant difference.
 
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