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With much trepidation, I took a dremel tool to my brand-new unfired Browning HP last night.

As per a FAQ or article elsewhere (by Mr. Camp I believe), I cut off the last two serrations on the spur of the hammer. It turned out alright, and very smooth.


This is only temporary. In January, I intend to have the hammer replaced by a pistolsmith. For right now though, I want to minimize bleeding.

Anyway, now I have this small spot of unfinished metal. I was just going to cold blue it, but I've never done this before.

What is the difference between the Perma-Blue and other blue that is readily available (Birchwood Casey?)?

Does it help if you heat up the chemical in a microwave or something first, or is it about the same?

Any pointers or links to webpages on this would be appreciated.

Thanks,
Brian TC
 

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Hi Brian,

I prefer 44/40 liquid cold blue, myself, but others work equally as well.
First be sure that you have degreased the part to be blued. For small repairs like yours, just clean it with some rubbing alcohol.
I've found that the blue will take better if the part is heated a bit before applying the blue. For your job, you could just heat it with a hair dryer.
This isn't to be a substute for the diirections on the bottle, but between applications of blue, I like to "polish" the area with 0000 steel wool.
Several applications of blue, then steel wool, leaving out the steel wool on the last coat, will give you a nice looking repair.
I'd suggest applying the blue with a Q-Tip.
Don't forget to oil it afterwords.

Good luck,
Jeff
 

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I second the 44/40 cold blue from Brownells.
I've tried all sorts of steel blueing and blackening agents and aluminum blackening agents.
Some work well, others not so well.
The 44/40 works quite well, and is the easiest to prep for and clean up after.
 

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A side note...

Does the 44/40 blue leave a residual "rust" smell after use? I've used the Birchwood Casey cold blue, and it leaves a peculiar odor if you touch the part with your hands...such as on the grip.
 

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Hello. Glad the job worked out for you. I think you'll see a nice difference.

I usually pour a bit of whatever cold blue I have at the time into the bottle's plastic lid and heat it a few seconds in the microwave and apply. It works quite well and holds up a bit better than when applied cold. It does not match the quality of a professional blue.

Best.
 

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For a small job like that, I have had very good luck with the Birchwood Casey bluing pen. Looks like a magic marker. You just color-in the spot, wait a second or two and then use a rag to polish it an blend it in. For small nicks and touch ups, it works quite well.
 
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