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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Once again I am in need of my fellow 1911 forum friends help with an issue. I have been a police officer for over 15 years and have been carrying a concealed weapon daily for pretty much all of that time. Yet, although I have received a ton of firearms training I have never received any training specifically dedicated to concealed carry. I brought this subject up with some of our training staff and as luck would have it, I was asked to get something together. Although I have some ideas of my own, I figured I shouldn't re-invent the wheel so to speak. Does anyone out there have a specific course that their department teaches that they might be willing to share? Due to obvious officer safety concerns, please PM me with specific course info. :)
 

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Retention, presentation, and effective concealment techniques are what will be different from your current "uniformed" training. Once the guns out everything is the same when you think of it.

I recommend incorporating interactive use of force scenarios to demonstrate what works and what does not holster, retention, and presentation wise. Red guns, face shields, and minimal pads often helps demonstrate key points where even the best lecture material cannot.

Best of luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That's what I was thinking. I have been polling various detectives asking how they have been commonly carrying their weapons and I have received some rather interesting feedback. Some need to go in the "dumbest thing you ever heard a non-gun loving LEO say" category.

The most useful feedback has been the following styles:

1. Belt holster with thumb break: exposed and under a coat/shirt
2. Open top belt holster: under a coat and few exposed.
3. Fanny Pack: very few on-duty but alot off-duty
4. Purse: some in a holster and some without
5. Ankle carry
6. IWB: with holster and yes, without (veeery few)
 

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I wok plain clothes, and the majority of cover garments are shirts or jackets. Therefor, drawing from concealed shirt will be slightly different than drawing from under a coat, as well as mag changes. As long as you train wearing the garments you'd most likely conceal under, that would be my recommendation
 

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Years ago (back in the 80's) I developed a training course for the academy in reference to off duty interventions. One of the biggest differences is the fact that although you know you're a good guy responding officers won't (even if they might be your best buddy...due to tunnel vision, stress, etc...) so Rule #1 is "follow all commands given by responding officers verbatim and without hesitation...do not ever turn toward the responding officers with weapon drawn"!!! Another is that you probably don't have the communications that you'd have on duty...with the advent of cell phones (didn't have them then!) you can call 911 and request that they notify responding officers that there are plain clothes officers on scene (or off duty) - this is not a certainty though so always follow rule #1. Since off duty time might also include family the family members (spouse, children if old enough, friends, etc...) should be briefed in advance on what to do and to do what is told to them without question or argument (when you tell your wife/husband/child to get away and stay down no matter what she/he darn sure should do it as it's one less thing you have to worry about if the [email protected]#t hit the ventilatur...I know - easier said than done, but very important nonetheless)

If your area is small enough and all of the officers know each other it's good to have a code phrase or number...NYC used "color of the day" to some success but again it's hit or miss.



Of course if at all an option...be a good witness and try not to have to get involved in an off duty encounter! You're typically at a serious disadvantage (others don't know you're a cop, communications, other influences, etc...)


Hope this helps a little.
 

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Warrior makes a great point. Off duty cary training should be just as much about the change in tactics and mindset. You are not in uniform with back up rolling, wearing a vest, with someone knowing what you are going to or into.

Now I know departments are different on retention and people can have different view points, but wearing a coat, or carrying concealed is a level of retention. You have to weigh the advantage of the thumbreak. For me, it is not worth it. Trying to reach under a shirt or coat and mess with clothing takes time, and getting a good grip a snapping that break can be time consuming under clothes. Now I like GOOD leather, some like good Kydex, but when your holster is boned, it is not going to fall out. I do acknowledge that fact that a lot of guys would use just about any POS out there without some guidance and on a cheaper holster, the break keeps Betsy in place. Good luck.
 

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We actually mandate holsters as much (or more) than weapons. We do not require a thumbreak but the holster must hold the weapon secure enough so that if held upside down (with an unloaded weapon and above a soft surface) and with the proper (as much as possible...hard to do with some IWB's using belt/body tension) tensioning provided the weapon won't just fall out if shaken moderately. We feel that our best retention device is the operator and provide continuing training there as well.
 

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Another thing to consider

I notice a LOT of cops tend to like carrying their badge clipped onto the same side as their weapon. Some may also carry other things there as well (cellphone, OC, etc.) There are obvious reasons why LEO's do this but if you are concealing using a pull up type garment (ie: t-shirt, sweatshirt, etc.) vs. a zip up/coat type garment there is the very likely potential that your support hand when clearing these types of garments will get snagged on one or more of these items. It's also likely that the covering garment itself (especially if it's a T-shirt) could also get caught on one of these items. So...I keep the gun side of my belt completely clear of anything that could snag. Obviously, zip up type garments don't exactly pose this problem. Just food for thought. Others ever notice this?
 
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