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Discussion Starter #1
Can anyone suggest the best way to transition from plinking/target shooting to action shooting? what would be the best kind of training to take to get a basic grasp of the tactics and skills required to survive a gunfight? I live in washington state, and am new to the forum any suggestions thanks in advance
 

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One option is to participate in an NRA Action Pistol shoot. This activity does not simulate a gunfight, and there is no running and hiding, but there is the necessity to draw and fire rapidly and accurately on an upper-torso size target. This is a way to get started in a safe shooting environment.
 

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1st of all, it's great that you recognize the need for training and you are fortunate that some great trainers are from WA. In addition to Marty Hayes, Greg Hamilton at www.insightstraining.com is there. The advantage of taking a class is that you will be taught how to teach yourself. Take notes and go home and practice the drills & skills. One thing to remember is that it's pretty useless to take a class and then never ingrain the lessons learned. Hope this helps.
 

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There are IPSC-style matches every weekend in Western Washington (Aug 12 at Interlake in Kirkland and Aug 19 at Paul Bunyan in Puyallup,) and IDPA matches on the third Saturday (Aug 18) at Renton. Hope this helps)

Justin
 

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Go to a local match and tell them your a new shooter. Most clubs will treat you like visiting dignatary and you will enjoy it. Start slow, ask questions and try not to shhot yourself or anyone else. I went to a match yesterday and a guy showed up with his Glock 21. By the time the match started he had a holster and a mag carrier. We told him to walk through the stages and watch his muzzle. He did great and will probably be back. Some of our Master shooters even gave him pointers during the match.
 

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Action shooting sports are pretty much unrelated to the skills necessary to survive a gunfight. The former can be learned with the help of folks in IPSC and IDPA clubs. For the latter, a good school is necessary.

You can do both, of course, but it is sometimes difficult to keep the lessons separate.

A prime example is "clearing". If you are checking your home or other area for intruders, the last thing you want to do is go fast. The action games are about speed of movement (as well as shooting), which is the wrong lesson.

There are a number of other important differences. "Clearing" is just one example.

As an IPSC and IDPA shooter from the inception of those games, who started defensive weapons classes years later, it is my view that most action shooters know little about defensive weapons use. I certainly didn't. And I had a lot of bad habits to unlearn.

For defensive training, there is no substitute for a good school.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Hey guys, thanks for all the responses. one thing im thinking about is which class to take. every school ive looked at has the "tactical pistol" type class that talks about all the things that i'd like to learn, and then the begginner class that talks about alot of stuff my dad drilled in my head from the age of eight up. so how do i figure out where i am? generally speaking i hit what i aim at, i feel i have a pretty good grasp of shoulder arms, but more like average with pistols since ive only had my own for about six months. so what do you think?
 

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Take the one that talks about the things you want to learn.

If you have several options, it is a good idea to talk to as many people as possible -- privately, where you can get the unvarnished truth -- about the courses and instructors. All instructors are not equal.
 

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If you have never taken formal training, I would suggest taking a lower level course that will make sure that your fundamentals are correct. You may or may not have the basics but I can promise you that without the proper foundation, it'll be a struggle to improve. Even if your skill level is more advanced, reinforcement of the basics is never a waste of time.
 
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