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Howdy all,

I'd like to pose my first question to the list:

If you could only take one training class, where would it be and why?

I'm new to IDPA and am taking some private lessons from one of the Master shooters in my club but I'm thinking of going all out and dropping the cash on my first big weeklong class.

I've heard great things about Gunsite, Thunder Ranch and Rangemaster and I'd like to get everyone's opinions on which to take.

The overall goal of the class will be to build my tactical/defensive shooting skills in order to better shoot competitively. I live in North Texas but travel is not a concern (it is, but not for the sake of this question
)

So, again, if you could only take one class, where and why? (not necessarily from the list above, just tell me what you think!)

Thanks all!
Brad

[This message has been edited by bradc (edited 08-24-2001).]
 

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Shooting better competitively and shooting defensively are two different skills. IDPA is a game, to be competitive you don't shoot it defensively. Good defensive skills might not make you a better competitor in IDPA, after all, most top IDPA competitors have an IPSC background.

If you want to be a good IDPA/IPSC shooter take a class from Matt Burkett http://www.mattburkett.com
 

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I agree with scooter...

Learning to shoot defensively and shooting competively are two different things. If you want to learn to shoot better faster, I'd go to someone like Matt Burkett, Todd Jarrett, Mike Voigt, Matt McLearn, Ron Avery (he actually teaches both competitive and defensive shooting. If you want to improve your defensive shooting skills I'd go to Clint Smith, John Farnam, Massad Ayoob or Gunsite. This is by no means a definitive list. There are a lot of good teachers out there and you can learn a lot from all of them.

Both sides are good, from my personal experience it is money and time well spent.


If I had to pick one..I would think seriously about Ron Avery. Ron is a very analytical shooter and is able to break down the individual bio-mechanics of the body to aid in better, faster, more accurate shooting. He is able to watch and see what each shooter does and communicate the skills to you to give you improvements. Ron is/was (not sure now) in law enforcment and is a top notch nationally ranked shooter. So he can present both sides.
Mind you, I have not taken his class, but he does shoot in our local section and I have learned a lot from shooting with him on occasion.

[This message has been edited by eerw (edited 08-25-2001).]
 
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