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There has got to be an easier way. This is only the 2nd time I have cleaned, then reassembled my LB PII 1 1/2" 5" Gov't 45. Total rounds now stand at 700. Both times were real struggles to move the bushing over to simply cover the side of the plug. I mean dripping with sweat. It took a metal bushing wrench to accomplish the task, destroying (stripping) one polymer bushing wrench.

Once the bushing was positioned over the plug, then the remaining turn was somewhat easier than the initial positioning. My SV was tough the first few cleanings, but nothing like this. Perhaps I should mention that these are my final assembly steps, all other assembly steps having been performed:
-push in & hold plug
-position wrench over plug & around bushing
-move bushing over edge of plug
-crank bushing around to final middle position

Thanks in advance!
 

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The "trick". (long post)

Here is the "trick"!

Disassembley: Wear safety glasses. Make sure the gun is unloaded. Cock the hammer. Pull the slide back & align the slide take down notch with the rear of the slide stop. Remove the slide stop. Ease the slide forward while keeping your free hand covering the recoil spring guide and recoil spring. When slide is removed, carefully release and remove the recoil spring guide & recoil spring. Tilt the muzzle up and press out the recoil spring plug. Lift & push the barrel forward to disengage it from the barrel bushing. With a bushing wrench, turn the barrel bushing all the way counter-clockwise. Use the barrel (pulling and tapping against the bushing) as a hammer to remove the barrel bushing from the slide. (barrel link should be down) It should then be easy to remove the bushing from the barrel with your fingers. Just pull it off, and you are done!

Assembly: This is a little trickier, and harder to describe, but here goes. Reinstall barrel bushing to barrel and put barrel (link forward) into front of slide about halfway. Slide bushing down to engage slide opening, and turn until it is in approximately the right place to push in flush with the slide. This is the hard part, because the bushing to slide fit is so tight. When you find the right spot, you can tap it in flush with a nylon hammer or punch. When you accomplish this, use your bushing wrench to turn the bushing until it's centered in the recoil spring plug opening. Pull barrel back to lock into slide, and push the recoil spring plug into the recoil spring plug tunnel (from the rear), until it mates and centers between the bushing feet. Insert open end of assembled recoil spring/recoil spring guide into the recoil spring tunnel from the rear, and push forward under pressure until it seats properly against the barrel feet, all the while keeping the spring from flying out with your free hand. Link should be in up position, by this point. While holding the recoil spring system down, slide the frame onto the slide until you can release your hold on the recoil spring assembly. Push slide forward, align link to take down hole, and reinsert the slide stop. Easy, right? (Whew! I think it's easier to do than to describe.)

Feel free to ask questions and/or make corrections and suggestions, but this method works really good for me and my P-II. Once you do it a few times, it's really quite routine & easy. Hope this helps you out, I know the frustration of trying to take down and put together a Baer the conventional way. It's not the barrel to bushing fit, it's the bushing to slide fit that's so tight it really makes it tough. You gotta love the reliability and accuracy, though! Man, I love this gun!

Larry
 

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OTOH, simply use a metal bushing wrench from the get-go, like Brownells' aluminum one. The plastic varieties are OK for most, but often not for Baers, which tend to be tight.

Keep going. The bushing will loosen with time and use.

Another Baer bushing issue is that the bushing tends to even be difficult to seat when first inserting it in the slide, that is, when the bushing base is at 7-8 o' clock, and you're trying to push it backward into the slide face during reassembly. A little tap to the front of the bushing using a nylon punch with a small brass hammer does the trick.
 

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I reassemble in the "normal" way except when I get to the last step where I have to turn the bushing to the position where it retains the recoil spring plug. I first push the slide rearward about 1/2 inch. Then I can turn the bushing with my nylon bushing wrench.
 

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Still no go

1000 rounds later, and I still can't get the bushing out on my TRS. I went thru all the steps doing it the conventional way because I didn't know that you could remove the slide before removing the bushing. Of course, I destroyed2 Wilson bushing wrench tools just doing this. And the bushing still doesn't go off the slide. It's turned counter clockwise to the best I could turn it which doesn't look too much more like a 4 o'clock when looking at it from the front (destroying a wrench just doing this.) I tapped with a nylon and wood stick the inside the slide to push the bushing out but it won't move at all. I am not going to use the the barrel to hammer it as I would get a heart attack if I damage this expensive piece. Should I return it to Les Baer?
 

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I cheated....I lapped the bushing to slide fit with JB Bore paste until I could turn it without a wrench. There's no play in the fit but now I can field strip the gun without cursing.
 

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nextstepguy said:
1000 rounds later, and I still can't get the bushing out on my TRS. I went thru all the steps doing it the conventional way because I didn't know that you could remove the slide before removing the bushing. Of course, I destroyed2 Wilson bushing wrench tools just doing this. And the bushing still doesn't go off the slide. It's turned counter clockwise to the best I could turn it which doesn't look too much more like a 4 o'clock when looking at it from the front (destroying a wrench just doing this.) I tapped with a nylon and wood stick the inside the slide to push the bushing out but it won't move at all. I am not going to use the the barrel to hammer it as I would get a heart attack if I damage this expensive piece. Should I return it to Les Baer?
I had the same problem with my Concept VII. With the bushing turned as far as it will go, in about the 4 o'clock position, I gently tapped the back of the barrel with a nylon hammer and the bushing popped right out. After struggling with it, puzzling over it, and turning the air blue with cusswords, I was surprised at how easily it came out when I tapped the barrel. There was no damage to the barrel at all. You might want to try this before you send it back to Baer.
 

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The only part of the barrel that contacts the bushing when you use it to tap out the bushing, is the barrel collar. It won't damage your barrel or bushing. It really does work.

Larry
 

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ElrodCod said:
I cheated....I lapped the bushing to slide fit with JB Bore paste until I could turn it without a wrench. There's no play in the fit but now I can field strip the gun without cursing.

Actually, the only issue I can see with this technique is that not only did you add tolerance to the bushing OD, you also add some to the slide ID.
 

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nextstepguy said:
Actually, the only issue I can see with this technique is that not only did you add tolerance to the bushing OD, you also add some to the slide ID.
So what! We're not talking about a lot of metal here. It's less than a thousandth because I can't detect any measurable difference with calipers. As long as oversize bushings are available I don't see any problem if I need to replace it in the future.
 

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I agree with ElrodCod. Some people would call that a *handlapped fit" and would be willing to pay extra for it. Seriously, all you are doing is knocking down the high spots on the tool marks. You do the same thing with that tight slide to frame fit Baers are known for when you first break it in. I thint you will find that the barrel to bushing fit will also need some JB. I did that after I could turn the bushing in the slide with my fingers. Now it dissembles like an old Colt.

Now for my disclaimer "I will only do this to my Thunder Ranch guns, and not to any with the 1 1/2" group garentee" and thats only because I paid extra for it.
 
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