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Discussion Starter #1
I've got a tiny bit of trigger creep on my Kimber Team Match II. I was thinking about lightly polishing the sear and hammer hooks with a little Flitz to smooth them out and take out the tool marks. I really don't have the proper tools to start stoning and messing with the sear and hammer angles. I just want to knock down the tool marks a little. I think this should take care of the creep. Any negatives to doing this? This is just a range and competition gun. It's not for defense so I don't mind playing around a bit with it.

Thanks,
Chris
 

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I am not a pistolsmith.

However...

A felt bob and a little flitz can often take last little bit of creep out of stock Kimber lockwork.

(I do this often...it works fine with no issues as long as you don't use anything more abrasive than Flitz or simichrome..)
 

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Someone pooh poohed my suggestion about using Flitz in another thread, but I too have used it to lightly polish trigger parts without any problems.

H
 

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Discussion Starter #4
bigboyhf said:
Someone pooh poohed my suggestion about using Flitz in another thread, but I too have used it to lightly polish trigger parts without any problems.

H
Yea, I have noticed two distinct schools of thought on a light polish on the trigger parts. Some say it's great, works and go for it. Others say unless you have $500 worth of stones and tools and a masters degree in gunsmithing don't even try it.

I guess the worse case scenario is that it renders the pistol unsafe and I'll have to replace the parts with a drop in kit which would in turn solve the creep issue.

This is only a range/competition pistol so I don't mind playing around with it.
 

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polishing the sear

Trigger creep can be caused by manuy different things:

1) uneven contact of sear nose when engaging hammer hooks.
You can use lay out die, smoke, or even a black magic marker to see
if the sear nose is contacting the hammer hooks evenly.

2) top of disconnector rubbing on inside recess of slide when pulling the trigger. The fix is to see if there are rub marks on the slide in the disconnector recess. If there are, deepen the disconnector recess of the slide with a dremel.

3) excessive disconnector movement when trigger is squeezed. (peen top
of disconnector hole in frame to reduce movement)

3) burrs in the trigger bow slot of frame.

I have found the most common problem of trigger creep is the improper contact of the sear nose and hammer hooks.
 

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Have you tried "boosting" your trigger? Make sure the gun is unloaded. Then cock the hammer, and while putting forward pressure on the hammer, dry fire it. Do this about 20 times. This usually does the trick for that last little bit of creep. I add a dab of Mothers Mag Aluminum Polish on the hammer hooks first to help it along. Don't forget to clean the contact surfaces to remove any traces of metal or grime. A drop of oil or grease on the hammer hooks helps too.

You don't need to lay out a lot of cash to work on a 1911 trigger. It's the experience and skill that expensive. All you really need is an Ed Brown Sear Jig ($35), a fine arkansas stone ($10), an x-fine ceramic stone ($20), and a 10x jewers loupe ($10). Oh, if you're like me, you'll also need to take into account the first 3 sears you ruin before you get it right. Of course it always helps to use quality parts.

-Good luck.
 

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I recommended against random polishing of critical parts (hammer and sear) and still do. The problem is that you may alter the angles of the engagement surfaces and render the gun unsafe. This is not an area you want to experiment in. Get Kuhnhausen's books, available from Brownells.
 

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"Don't touch them". :)

A little creep isn't going to hurt your shooting and...

They "smooth" out with use and you can put a drop of oil on the sear/hammer.
 

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I agree don't touch it yet. I am by no means a gunsmith. The extent of my abilities is that I can fully strip my 1911 and put it back together, BUT, when I first got my Kimber Stainless Target II, there was a slight creep in the trigger. Every one of the "know it alls" at the local range said it needed a trigger job. I said ok and continued to break in my new pistol. After the 500 round break in, I noticed the creep was still there, but not as much. After about 2500 rounds I attempted my first detail strip of the gun. I looked over every part, not only to see how they worked and fit together, but to check for any burs or uneven surfaces. After a thorough cleaning I put it all back together and all was fine. The parts had gotten to a point where they had mated themselves well with each other. My trigger now has no creep at all and breaks clean. Just my 2 cents.
 

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Hmmm, Kimber characteristic maybe? A fellow shooter at our club had purchased a new Kimber a few years back. It had a little click in the trigger. He asked if I'd do the trigger for him and I said for him, yes. He went to give me the gun a few hundred rounds later and I tried the trigger and asked, "Why?". It was nice the way it was. It was smooth and crisp.
 

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Dry firing 2500 times is the "poor man's" trigger job. It may work...or not... It worked on my Wilson :eek: along with a little Flitz. :mummy:

My Kimber with the do it yourself C&S kit is very clean and crisp and I thought it was the "end all" of great triggers, until I picked up my Nighthawk. I guess a good gunsmith can make a big difference! The extra crispness may not make a difference in a SHTF self defense situation, but it does help me a lot at the range. And its one of those things that until you experience it, you just can't fully understand the feeling it gives you...

H
 
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