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Discussion Starter #1
I measured the trigger pull on my Kimber Aluminum SS Compact because it seemed a bit light. It measured a consistent 3 1/4 lb. I want to carry this gun and think that it might be a bit light. Is there a way to get this up to about 4 lb's without a complete trigger job?

H
 

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Bend the middle leg of the sear spring in slightly (towards the front of the pistol). A little goes a long way - don't bend much.
 

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The functional difference between 3.25 lb and 4 lb is trivial. If the first is too light for you, so is the second. As a practical matter, I doubt there are very many people who can truly tell the difference between the two.

That said, a little more pressure on the left leg of the sear spring should be all that's needed to get it up to 4 lbs.
 

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As I stated, the MIDDLE leg of the sear spring can be used to adjust trigger pull weight. The left leg adjusts tension on the sear itself. While adjusting the left leg will no doubt add some weight to the pull due to the increased pressure on the sear, the correct way is to bend the middle leg.

And if you shoot enough, you most certainly can tell the difference between a 3 1/2 and a 4 lb. trigger. ;)
 

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Shane's correct

that the middle leaf of the spring is the one that primarily determines pull weight as it rides against the disconnector which is on the end of the trigger.

But, I also vote for increasing pressure some on the left leaf (sear return spring), since jack Weigand claims those two pressures should be kept equal in a good trigger job. Increasing sear force will also increase trigger pull weight because the trigger has to rotate the sear (against that spring) to get the hammer to fall.

You can feel the two different springs as they "kick in" if you hold the hammer all the way back and slowly pull the trigger. The first part is the disconnector spring only, then when you hit the sear, you are pulling against both the disc and sear leafs of the spring.
 

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I usually set the middle finger so that the reset weight is about 1/3 the total trigger pull weight that you want, then adjust the left leg to get to the specified poundage. I don't like a heavy reset on the trigger. This also allows more weight on the sear which will end up more reliable especially if you go start getting to the real light triggers.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
How do you measure the reset weight? I know how to measure the total weight of the trigger, but not the individual springs....

It's interesting that I thought the trigger on the Kimber was lighter than my Stealth but I just measured it and the Stealth is set to exactly 3 lbs. It just seems to break a little differently.

H
 

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I measure the sear spring's pressures using a very good pull gauge. Hold the gun with the left hand and depress the grip saferty and hold the hammer FULLY to the rear where it can't touch the sear (takes some practice).

Zero the pull gauge and gently pull on the trigger. The first (light) portion of travel is from the leaf bearing against the disconnector only which is the center leaf. When the disconnector hits the sear, you will read a higher value that is the SUM of the disconnector leaf resistance plus the sear return leaf force (the left one). Get the value for the sear leaf only by subtracting #2 reading from #1.
 

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Sometimes the actually trigger pull weight is very hard to judge without a gauge because some triggers break quick while others take a longer stroke to disconnect the sear and let the hammer fall....

If you want to shoot the gun I'd opt for a light trigger and if I didn't want to shoot the gun keep keep your finger off the trigger. Thats the best answer for a tactical trigger poundage I can think of because your the determining factory if it's going to shoot not the weight of the trigger and or where the trigger breaks.... I have yet to understand why people want a super heavy trigger on a carry gun.... That said they can be extreamely light also and disconnect to quick .... I would have to say disconnecting to quick would be the most dangerious of the two (too little hammer engagement)......

I hope this post gets people to thinking about the subject of what a a trigger is supposed to do beside have the perfect weight or overtravel and anything else that has been discussed in all those lame gun rags.. Basically I mean to say do your own thinking on the subject and really think about it before one of these so called "profesionals" tells you otherwise....
 

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Discussion Starter #10
steele_37031 said:
I hope this post gets people to thinking about the subject of what a a trigger is supposed to do beside have the perfect weight or overtravel and anything else that has been discussed in all those lame gun rags.. Basically I mean to say do your own thinking on the subject and really think about it before one of these so called "profesionals" tells you otherwise....
Thanks for bringing this up. It stirs up some controversy and other factors regarding what constitutes a "good" tactical trigger pull other than just the weight of the pull.

H
 

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Good points brought out here. You have to decide how to train,whether for gaming or self defense. Once you bring the barrel on the target and put your finger in the trigger guard you have made the decision to destroy something, whether its paper or flesh. In real situations of self defense trigger weight means little as long as it works every time. I think each individual needs to decide(by trying them out)what weight is the most comfortable to them. Personally I prefer about 3.25lbs. In an adrenalin charged situation most couldn't tell 3.25 from 10 lbs including me. Just my preferance.
 

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BAD ME

I prefer under 2lb on my gun.
Practice practice practice............
 

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Radar said:
In an adrenalin charged situation most couldn't tell 3.25 from 10 lbs including me. Just my preferance.
I'd suggest that the opposite is true. If a 10 pound trigger makes it harder to hit than a 3.5ish trigger under perfect conditions, it will be at least as bad - if not worse - under conditions of dire stress. Stress NEVER makes anything easier.

One note: NRA bullseye competitions specify minimum trigger pull weights, as might some other competitions.
 

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bigboyhf said:
Thanks for bringing this up. It stirs up some controversy and other factors regarding what constitutes a "good" tactical trigger pull other than just the weight of the pull.

H
From what I've seen, trigger pull weight is less relevant than trigger pull DISTANCE in preventing AD's. It's fine to say proper gun handling prevents AD's, but when confronted by a deadly threat, 99% of the people in this world are going to put their finger on the trigger. Adrenaline will convert that 5# pull into a 1/2# pull. A longer pull is more forgiving than a short one.
 

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CastleBravo said:
I'd suggest that the opposite is true. If a 10 pound trigger makes it harder to hit than a 3.5ish trigger under perfect conditions, it will be at least as bad - if not worse - under conditions of dire stress. Stress NEVER makes anything easier.
The loss of accuracy likely won't be from the difference in pull weight, it will be from panic-yanking the trigger which rotates the gun off line.... regardless of pull weight.
 

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Trigger pull to light

Hi Bigboyhf: There is a very good article on Brownells Bench Talk by Jack Weigand. This is for a 2 1/2 lb. trigger pull, but the basics are the same. It tells about sear, hammer,disconnector prep, and how to measure the sear spring leafs. Has pictures and of course products to do the job. Interesting read if nothing else.:D
----------------------------------
Happiness is "25 straight"
 

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bountyhunter said:
The loss of accuracy likely won't be from the difference in pull weight, it will be from panic-yanking the trigger which rotates the gun off line.... regardless of pull weight.
You are missing my point, I think. Put another way, both sources of lost accuracy will be in effect; it isn't an either-or proposition as you imply.

A gun with a heavier trigger will be more difficult to shoot accurately than a gun with a lighter trigger, all else being equal.

Stress won't change that fact. To say otherwise is to claim that stress makes existing difficulties go away, when of course that isn't true; it amplifies them. Stress will only make EVERYTHING more difficult. The increased difficulty in shooting accurately that goes with increased trigger pull weight still remains, and adds to the shooter's difficulty imposed by stress.

Put another way, shooting accurately with a heavy trigger is more demanding than shooting accurately with a lighter trigger; among other things, that is why all handgun competitors tend towards the lightest triggers that are allowed by the rules and function reliably. So when is the last time that you heard of a more demanding task getting easier with increased stress?

The only way I can see your argument making sense is if you belive that stress will always result in a total failure to apply learned shooting skills. If that is the case, then all practice is a waste of time, since none of our shooting skills will carry over, and we can use our shooting time to drink beer and watch football instead. :D
 

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Train, Train, Train thats the only way to react under stress. And good points CastleBravo. My point being: if I put my finger inside the trigger guard and bring it on target it is getting shot, hense, the arguement that I always hear is: a lighter trigger pull will get you in trouble some how. Another way to say this: If you point a deadly weapon at me I will fire on you given the chance regardless of trigger pull because I think that you have put me in a situation that will be life threatening.
Good lessons to learn in the "real world".
 

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Radar,

Yea you have about .75 seconds to change my mind, cause the last .25 will be pressing the trigger and I dont care how much it weighs or how long it is!

On springs.

You can adjust either middle or left and change the pull weight.
There is no right or wrong here (it has to be safe) for the top shooters its adjusted to the way they want it to "feel"

Larry P
 

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Discussion Starter #20
So I gather that 3 lb trigger pull is "safe" so long as the hammer doesn't fall if someone in the same room sneezes... I personally like the feel of the trigger and following the rules should keep it safe. Keep finger off trigger until I am actually going to shoot. Sounds like it even makes sense...:hrm:

H :cool:
 
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