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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My wife and I took her niece to the airport this afternoon and hit a gun show on the way home. Here's my latest, an H&R Self-loader .32 acp, second series; based on 16 serrations and the magazine disconnector.




And here it is with the two more popular .32 acp pistols of their day:


Colt Model 1903, Savage Model 1907, and the H&R circa 1914 on
 

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Chief !!!


I don't know if any one else high fives you, but put 'em in the air buddy.

You da man. The Colt is one thing. Finding a Savage is another thing. The H&R is reaching the top!



[I have a 1912 Steyr, rotating barrel. It ain't mint, but I like it.]
 

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Nice group from yesteryear. Those would be great guns to take to the range and experience shooting them.
 

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Wow. A tremendous collection of semi-auto history.

THANK YOU for sharing.:)
 

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Very neat collection. I'd like to point out that these pistols are all contemporaries of the 1911. It's a wonderful illustration of just how far ahead of his time JMB was when he designed the 1911.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I haven't shot the either the Savage or the H&R but I will next time I go shooting.

What do I think about their utility? I wouldn't want to be shot by any of them! I would never carry any of them as a primary pistol but if they shoot OK with ball ammo I would consider them as a back-up.
 

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cwo4uscgret---Sometimes I carry a Colt 1908 .380 as a primary. Or my 1927 Systema 1911. Out of my .32's, my Dreyse & my Spanish Ruby have shown 100% reliability. The Ruby is the "newest" at around eighty years old. The others are about 100.

When I'm in the sticks I carry a 1st generation Colt SAA .45 from 1898. She works.

There's no reason a good old gun can't be used as a carry piece. However, .32 acp is not a big round.

Frans Ferdinand could attest to it's lethality. But I prefer to carry bigger. But the age of the gun is not a factor. Weight & caliber is, but not age.
 

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The H&R looks like it got a bit of inspiration from the British made Webley .32 pistol of 1906:

 

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Just curious how they shoot. I have the Colt and the Savage but have never shot either of them. You have stirred my interest in these old autos. Maybe my next trip to the range I'll try them, they both appear to be in serviceable condition. I've owned them both over 40 years. They were acquired in a large trade and I just kept them. I kept the Colt because of the extremely smooth slide to frame fit and the Savage because it is so weird looking.
Bill
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
yes it does...

The H&R looks like it got a bit of inspiration from the British made Webley .32 pistol of 1906:

they were made under license from Webley, with some changes that included an internal striker, not a hammer...Webley even made one chambered in .455.
 

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they were made under license from Webley, with some changes that included an internal striker, not a hammer...Webley even made one chambered in .455.
Interesting, I din't know that about the licensed manufacture.

I am familiar with the larger .455 Webley semi-auto pistol, a friend of mine had one and I was able to have a go with it. My impression was it was well engineered, but lacked the more natural pointability and feel of the 1911 pattern pistol.

The .32 Webley I found to be a very accurate little gun.
 
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