1911Forum banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,049 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a Colt Commander that has always been reliable, never failing to feed or eject. However, the ejection pattern has always driven me nuts, especially since I started reloading. This gun tends to want to throw empties either straight up and slightly forward, or forward and right (2 o'clock). Basically, all my brass ends up on the range and I can't recover it.

I've tweaked extractor tension, no apparent change.

Today, I decided to throw caution to the wind and break out the file. The ejector nose profile on the stock Colt Commander ejector has the "point" at the top 1/3rd of the ejector face. I first tried to move this contact point down a bit. Went to the range, with the file, and checked ejection. No real change, maybe the case spun a little less on the way out, but still not back over my right shoulder. Ok, file a little more, bring the contact point down some more, add a little more angle back and to the right, looking at the nose from the top. No big change, maybe less forward but still about 2:30 o'clock or so. Next, I tried just making a vertical, flat nose, no angles. No big change.

So I'm stumped. Am I wasting my time on the ejector nose? Is there something else going on here? Or is it just my lack of skill :biglaugh:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,049 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hmm. This is what I started with...

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,049 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
What effect does the length have on the ejection pattern? I've read that the longer nose is for use in the guns with shorter slide cycle times (Commander, Officer) to get the case out earlier in the ejection phase, but does it influence the angle at which the case leaves the ejection port?

It's interesting to note that in my research on this subject, I've seen different nose profiles, some with the contact point up high, some down low, some with a flat nose, pronounced inboard angle, no inboard angle, and all owners say that particular profile was what fixed their ejection pattern issues and resulted in a consistent 4 to 5 o'clock path from the ejection port. Seems like an adjustment that's unique to each particular gun..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
197 Posts
What effect does the length have on the ejection pattern? I've read that the longer nose is for use in the guns with shorter slide cycle times (Commander, Officer) to get the case out earlier in the ejection phase, but does it influence the angle at which the case leaves the ejection port?

It's interesting to note that in my research on this subject, I've seen different nose profiles, some with the contact point up high, some down low, some with a flat nose, pronounced inboard angle, no inboard angle, and all owners say that particular profile was what fixed their ejection pattern issues and resulted in a consistent 4 to 5 o'clock path from the ejection port. Seems like an adjustment that's unique to each particular gun..
I think the longer ejector will be prone to throw the case forward, but there are a lot of factors at work here. Slide speed (hot load, target load, etc.), recoil spring strength, extractor tension and configuration are some things that will affect it. A loose firing pin stop to extractor will let the extractor turn (clocking) and cause inconsistencies too. All breaches don't fit the case heads the same either. The ejector nose angles as you surmised changes where it strikes the case, which will change the direction the case tends to fly. I think it would be interesting to use a high speed camera to study ejection, but I don't have one of those.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,112 Posts
What the extended Ejector does is contact the rim of the case earlier.
Here's a pic that might help.

Courtesy of Niemi

Basically, the lower the rim hits the Ejector the higher it will eject. You might want to stone a slight angle on the inside edge of the Ejector to help direct the case a little.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,546 Posts
Hammerdown, While everyone seems to try to fix ejection problems with the ejector alone, the extractor also plays an important part, as the extractor if not properly profiled, will hold the case in such a way as it won't allow it to rotate. Check to make sure your extractor is properly profiled before you start filing more on the ejector. Best,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,049 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I'll take a look at it.

As I said previously, increasing/decreasing tension didn't seem to have much effect.

Is there something particular to look for in the hook nose profile that contributes to making the cases release forward/backward/straight up?
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top