1911Forum banner

1 - 20 of 52 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,897 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
hey all, not looking to debate WHICH vehicle is the best for a BOV. Rather I'm looking for ideas on what I can do to help turn my daily driver into a more useful and better equipped BOV or what supplies I could/should keep handy at all times. While a Ma Duece stacked to the hilt in water filters and crap sitting at home would be awesome, I'm not able to tie up that much money in something that may never be needed. Also with my luck anything that goes south will happen while I'm at work, 15 miles of urban/suburban roads from home.

There are some caveats though, I'm appreciating the idea of Grey Man a bit more as I get older. My last SUV was rhino lined with big bumpers and stuff. and while that looked cool, stood out like a sore thumb.

Now I have a Lexus GX460, which is pretty much a Toyota Land cruiser with nicer seats. full time 4x4 with locker, 300hp, 350 ft pounds of torque, standard armor (though light) on the bottom, etc.

I'm building an ~4" tall shelf/drawer for the cargo area. this is where I could keep a rifle and mags in a case, and whatever else needs to be kept. Already have a battery jump box, some tow straps, 2 water bottles, and small set of hand tools. also this guy in a spare compartment:


I have a trailer rack that I can throw on and stack with nato cans. if I need to get out of town. I'm going to buy some sort of roof rack so I can use a cargo carrier as well.

so with that, what do I add or do? what modifications/additions/supplies have you added to your vehicle or found that makes life a bit better?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,803 Posts
A shovel, chainsaw, come-along.
Sleeping bag, wool blanket, water, wire, duct tape, bucket, cordage, a multi tool, battery powered drill, ax, flashlight, Scotch Brite pad, pencil and tablet, first aid kit, Hi Lift jack, tow chain, a donkey dong for your NATO cans, tarp, 2 meter, bolt cutters(a big one) wire cutters, oxy acetylene tanks including a cutting torch, bungee cord assortment, sun hat, a comfortable, well broken in pair of boots, rain gear, highway fusees, Coleman lantern and stove, a big wrecking bar, 8# sledge, and a tent if there's no room left in your car for sleeping,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,529 Posts
I drive a Lincoln Towncar. It does have a HUGE trunk that would probably hold 6 months worth of supplies. Other than that it is worthless as a BOV. At least I can die comfortably
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,897 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Sleeping bag, wool blanket, water, wire, duct tape, bucket, cordage, a multi tool, battery powered drill what's this for?, ax, flashlight, Scotch Brite pad again why?, pencil and tablet, first aid kit, Hi Lift jack, tow chain, a donkey dong for your NATO cans, tarp, 2 meter 2 meter what?, bolt cutters(a big one) wire cutters, oxy acetylene tanks including a cutting torch also why, bungee cord assortment, sun hat, a comfortable, well broken in pair of boots, rain gear, highway fusees, Coleman lantern and stove, a big wrecking bar, 8# sledge, and a tent if there's no room left in your car for sleeping,
I like and agree with most of what you have listed but was curious about a few of the other things? responded in bold in the quote.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
123 Posts
Like you I’m a suburbanite who appreciates the gray man approach. My DD is a Toyota Tacoma 4X4 double cab short bed. It’s competent enough to hop a curb, cross a median or go in the snow while still being small enough to be nimble in traffic. These are some of the things I’ve done that are in my truck every day, not everything I’d do or carry if I had time to load up for a bugout.

A flat tire will stop you in your tracks. You know that saying “two is one and one is none”? How many spare tires do you carry? It doesn’t take much of a storm to put a lot of debris on the roads and this gets exponentially worse as the event gets more serious. Obviously it’s not practical to ride around with multiple spare tires. I carry an air pump (Viair P88), plug kit and a couple of bottles of Slime. I’ve used the air pump with this truck and I’ve used the plug kit on vehicles I’ve had in the past so I’m comfortable with both. I’ve never used the Slime but by all accounts it works as advertised. Together with the air pump it’s probably faster to use the Slime then change the tire, if time were an issue. The fact that you can fix the tire without dismounting it may be of benefit all by itself. Carrying a couple of bottles of Slime is certainly NOT the equivalent of having multiple real spare tires but it may be good enough to keep you mobile in an emergency.

I also feel it important to get out and actually change a tire. Use the tools you have in the truck and see how they work. Where are the jack points and can you get the lug nuts off the wheels? How long does it really take? I learned a lot doing this on my Tacoma and while the factory tools work, I now carry several other things to make the job easier. Reading the manual about how to change a tire is a good thing, going out and changing a tire is much, much better.

My Tacoma has 13 cup holders and I keep a liter bottle of water in six of them. These are all in the doors and for the most part out of sight and out of mind until I need it. It’s not just for drinking, I’ve used it for washing up before getting back in the truck as well.

There are major drive train components (front and rear pumpkin, transmission and probably others) that have breathers installed in them. Lots of 4 wheel drive guys will route these higher up in the vehicle using fuel line. This gets them up and out of any high water you may need to cross. I don’t think a little bit of water in the gear oil or transmission fluid would stop you in your tracks but then we don’t know how far you might need to go in an emergency. Better safe than sorry and it doesn’t cost much to do.

You’ve already got the jump box (good idea!) but I also keep a spare charger cable for my phone and an AA battery charger with 12 volt adaptor (all my SHTF stuff will run on Eneloops). If you’re running the engine anyway there’s no reason you shouldn’t be topping off every battery powered gadget you might have a use for (including your jump box). Speaking of which, just because you have a USB port in your vehicle doesn’t mean it’s going to be useful for charging. USB ports charge at various rates (older being slower, generally) and it’s cheap as chips to buy one of those 12 volt to USB adaptors built to the latest (and fastest) USB standard. The difference in charging can be HUGE. Pretty much any car audio place should be able to install additional ports in your truck if you want more than the truck originally came with.

If your vehicle hasn’t got blue tooth for your phone see if you can get it. Being able to make and take phone calls without taking your eyes off the road is a safety issue in normal times. Being able to do it during an emergency is just that much more important. It came standard with my Tacoma and I’ll never buy another car or truck without it.

A come-along as a useful tool and worth the weight. A bumper mounted winch isn’t exactly gray man. Sometimes it doesn’t take much to get unstuck and it’s not always going to be about your vehicle. Maybe that car that’s blocking the road is two or three cars in front of you. A come-along might not be as good as a winch but it does allow you to take the tool to the problem. A shovel, a saw and an axe should at least give you a chance with a debris blocked road.

Be aware of the cost of weight. Find a balance in the all the stuff you pack or the mods you do vs the cost in fuel economy. Big tires and a lift may be great in the mud but they don’t really do anything for you on the road and they’re going to knock miles and miles off your range on a tank of gas. May be worth it but it may not.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
A few magazines to read while stuck in traffic gridlock. Just so you can keep up with what's going on with the Kardashians.
actually never really thought about this, and I am prolly gonna put a couple mags/books :rock:
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
11,450 Posts
Since youre looking for more of a low visability approach , first- tires. Not oversized mudders that require 6" of lift, but capable, durable rubber that fits the stock truck- I'm partial to Goodyear Duratracs, they don't stand out as super aggressive, yet quite capable, and available in heavy duty E load ratings. You have to work to puncture one...
Spares. As mentioned, 2 is one, and one is none. However, this would require some external (and visabie) carrier, which increases visability- however, anything "non OEM" will probably stand out with Lexus badging.

A little body armor; front and rear bumpers, and fender protection. Talking abot pushing a car out of the way is one thing- until doing so crumples a fender into a wheelwell and shreds a tire. Yet not really low visability...

Winches are great- IF you know how to use one safely and effectively. They're also both the least likely to be needed piece of kit, and by far the most dangerous. And they don't help with"inconspicuous".... that said, a come along (with about a 2k working load) is NOT a substitute...
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
11,450 Posts
FWIW, I'm not sure I'd say that a GX is "pretty much" a Landcruiser... differnent engines, transmissions, xfer cases, gearing, brakes, fuel tanks, fuel requierments, weight, reare access, wheelbase and track, tire size, interior room, towing capacity ... even differnent bodywork... and a $30k price difference; surprisingly, the "luxury" branded offering is less expensive.

They didn't just change the trim level and rebadge the truck... they're quite differnent.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,897 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
FWIW, I'm not sure I'd say that a GX is "pretty much" a Landcruiser... differnent engines, transmissions, xfer cases, gearing, brakes, fuel tanks, fuel requierments, weight, reare access, wheelbase and track, tire size, interior room, towing capacity ... even differnent bodywork... and a $30k price difference; surprisingly, the "luxury" branded offering is less expensive.

They didn't just change the trim level and rebadge the truck... they're quite differnent.
not the full size landcruiser like the big guy, but it's a 150 series (land cruiser prado) sold in other countries. Similar frame size to the 4runner here. It's shares a 4.6 v8 with the tundra and prado :rock:
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
11,450 Posts
not the full size landcruiser like the big guy, but it's a 150 series (land cruiser prado) sold in other countries. Similar frame size to the 4runner here. It's shares a 4.6 v8 with the tundra and prado :rock:
Very true... I was comparing US market offerings, what is currently available... I've had Prados overseas over the years: solid trucks- but not offered in the US market. The 150s are bigger than the 4runner/Surf, but smaller than the 100 series LC with 5.7V8s... somewhere between a large mid size and small full size...

"Landcruiser" is a model that has varying, current, premutations....

Regardless, you can probably increase mobility and survivability of your GX without sacrificing too much "grey man"... tires, front and rear body armor, maybe a second spare on the rear end... not over the top, hard core offroader machine, but enhanced capabilities if needed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,234 Posts
FWIW, I'm not sure I'd say that a GX is "pretty much" a Landcruiser... differnent engines, transmissions, xfer cases, gearing, brakes, fuel tanks, fuel requierments, weight, reare access, wheelbase and track, tire size, interior room, towing capacity ... even differnent bodywork... and a $30k price difference; surprisingly, the "luxury" branded offering is less expensive.

They didn't just change the trim level and rebadge the truck... they're quite differnent.
You are right, the sequoia or top end Lexus SUV are more of land cruisers that are bloated. I would since my mom drives the former of the two and I have worked on all of the above.

My daily beater is a simple jeep WJ with a .300 blackout and 300 rounds of ammo and the usual medical gear and tools/food. Nothing overly fancy but it is capable enough off road and is adequate for many uses. Gun doesn't stay in the car btw since so many here get triggered by that.....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
413 Posts
I like the Grey Man approach as well. My daily driver is a 2018 RAM 1500 4x4 Limited crew cab with the RAM box bed storage. For storing a LOT of "extras", the RAM box, which is a compartment built into each side of the bed, is awesome! I have one side dedicated to emergency equipment. First Aid, tow rope, tools, air pump, come along, ropes, tire repair kits, extra oil, KelTec Sub2000 Glock with extra ammo and magazines, small BOB, water, hatchet, saw, you name it and I probably have it all neatly stowed inside that box. The other side is clear, but able to accommodate a few long guns with ammo and extra mags as well as other stuff if needed. All completely out of sight.

The truck itself has the largest fuel tank available from RAM at 34 gallons, and I have the bed management system that allows me to safely secure additional cans of fuel without having them slide around. Of course the 4x4 combined with a Hemi is an awesome combo, but I also have the air lift option that allows me to, at the push of a button, lift the truck an additional few inches for added ground clearance when needed. Slightly oversize BFG ATs (the latest version with aggressive mud shoulders) give me excellent on and off road traction. On the highway, at reasonable speeds, I can get 21-23mpg for a max range of over 700 miles under optimum conditions, but my real average is around 18.5mpg combined even with my lead foot, which still allows me a more conservative 600 miles on one tank of fuel if I can stay on the pavement. Even when making a trip down to the Mansfield Cut from Padre Island, about 70 miles each way in DEEP sand and locked in 4-wheel drive, I was able to average around 13mpg, which is pretty dang good under those conditions.

Downside is I have a lot of electronics in the vehicle since it is the most luxurious trim level available, so that is a vulnerability, but that's just the reality of today's vehicles anyway. I've come to have confidence in the RAM off road, having had a 2014 and a 2012 before that. With the air suspension lift on this current one it is even more capable, something I've been able to test on my hunting lease with some VERY trying conditions. If it has a weakness it is in soupy mud, but I've been pretty impressed in its ability to crawl up and over rocky terrain without any real issues. Even in mud, if there is a bottom to it, is not too big a problem. Not bad for a cushy ride that has all the comforts of my wife's loaded out SUV and that blends with the crowd as just a nice vehicle, but nothing overtly outstanding.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
158 Posts
Since youre looking for more of a low visability approach , first- tires. Not oversized mudders that require 6" of lift, but capable, durable rubber that fits the stock truck- I'm partial to Goodyear Duratracs, they don't stand out as super aggressive, yet quite capable, and available in heavy duty E load ratings. You have to work to puncture one...
Spares. As mentioned, 2 is one, and one is none. However, this would require some external (and visabie) carrier, which increases visability- however, anything "non OEM" will probably stand out with Lexus badging.

A little body armor; front and rear bumpers, and fender protection. Talking abot pushing a car out of the way is one thing- until doing so crumples a fender into a wheelwell and shreds a tire. Yet not really low visability...

Winches are great- IF you know how to use one safely and effectively. They're also both the least likely to be needed piece of kit, and by far the most dangerous. And they don't help with"inconspicuous".... that said, a come along (with about a 2k working load) is NOT a substitute...
UGGG, getting tired of that "one Is none" who the hell started that.....As far as your tires go, a portable air compressor and a couple of tire plug kits and a spare pak of plugs....no reason you couldn't repair other things with It as well(radiator hose anyone) also keep a spare set of belts for your engine as well, unless you think you can get by using paracord. ;)
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
11,450 Posts
UGGG, getting tired of that "one Is none" who the hell started that.....As far as your tires go, a portable air compressor and a couple of tire plug kits and a spare pak of plugs....no reason you couldn't repair other things with It as well(radiator hose anyone) also keep a spare set of belts for your engine as well, unless you think you can get by using paracord. ;)
Try fixing a cut from shale (or glass or sheetmetal) with plugs, or a puncture greater than the diameter of a 16d nail... a 3/16th bolt hole won't seal propely with plugs- unless re filling thr tire every 30 miles or 30 minutes is a "fix"....

Back in my youth, when I'd hunt the deep Cascades, I'd start out with 4-6 spares in the bed of the truck... when I got down to 2 (it happened) the hunting was done and we headed out. It was a 1-3 day walk out of the mountains, depending on location.

Tires are subject to all sorts of abuse and road hazards. Belts on decently maintained and serviced vehicles don't break- and the modern-day serpentine belt isn't a user freindly roadside fix....
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
11,450 Posts
As for the "two is one, one is none" concept, it originated in the military, to emphasize and stress, to the lowest level, the importance of redundant systems to accomplish a mission. If there's a single point of failure in a system, the entire system is failure prone.from the strategic all the way down to the operational level, no plan is executed without some redundancy and contingency. To do so is to invite failure.

I typically avoid cliches; they tend to over simplify things if one doesn't understand the context... however, in this case knowing the context, the concept is valid.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,106 Posts
I carry an extra Crankshaft for my Special Purpose SHTFBOVMRAP. If you need one, it will be invaluable.

I am not a BOV Expert (I had to look up BOV, to see what it meant). I don’t think I would ever BO, but I think more likely need to get home. So I guess, I am more interested in BIV... or, GGMSTW (go get my staranded wife vehicle). For those situations I will likely use my daily driver. My truck...

I liked the earlier post... Good tires and reenforced bumpers (stuff I already got) along with reenforced step sides, and I am thinking - good maintenance.

Season and terrain matters... Carry some extras depending on the situation you are most likely gonna need. I hope to hear some new ideas. I got a Weathergaurd Truck Box that has about 4 cubic inches of space still available. Look forward to hearing more comments.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,803 Posts
I like and agree with most of what you have listed but was curious about a few of the other things? responded in bold in the quote.
battery powered electric drill---a quick way to fix a punctured tire with a slow leak--- pull the nail out with pliers and shoot a deck screw in the hole before all the air leaks out,

Scotch Brite pad---takes bugs off your windshield. If you'll be driving all night bugs can get thick enough to cut down visibility.

2-meter---handheld shortwave radio for commo. CB is pretty near obsolete.

oxy acetylene tanks, including a small cutting torch---for the same reason you'd want a chainsaw, only a chain saw won't cut through steel obstacles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,042 Posts
> gridlock

This is the elephant in the room that too many people try to handwave away. After the attempted evacuation of Houston last year, we have video of how swiftly roads can turn into parking lots.

If you have to evacuate a whole family, you're pretty much stuck with some sort of car or SUV. If it's just you, or perhaps you and a spouse... you can move right around the lines of stalled cars if you're on a motorcycle. Some of the "adventure" style machines have impressive range for a motorcycle, and if you have to, you can get one over Jersey barrier blockades.

For a family... plain old pedal-type bicycles are a tremendous mobility extender. You can even get trailers (for motorcycles too) to extend your cargo capability. And the whole herd of you can pedal around practicing your SHTF chops without exciting any comment from neighbors.
 
1 - 20 of 52 Posts
Top