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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
In the January 2004 issue of Guns & Ammo, Wiley Clapp announces that Smith & Wesson will produce two new variants of the SW1911 in 2004:


"[A]n upgraded SW1911 Target variant and also a scandium-frame gun with short Commander length upper."

:D

Wow! A lightweight, I mean really lightweight, Commander by S&W. What a carry gun!
 

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Thanks for the info Chuck. I knew about the Scandium framed Commander but not the Target variation.

Good news for LW Commander fans.

Regards,
Sam
 

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Well, that's interesting.
I'll be waiting to see if it is a real Commander clone or a Kimber Compact type with no bushing and weak recoil spring.
And for somebody to shoot one to destruction and see if the Scandium frame is more durable than the plain aluminum of Colt, Kimber, and S&W XX04 guns.

Will a target SW1911 be a real target gun, with really good fitting for X-ring accuracy? Will it mean the demise of the PC 945?

Wait and see, I guess.
 

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Emoto said:
Have they made semi-auto pistols with scandium frames before?
Yes, but only a couple. But S&W is investing heavily in their 1911 line. I doubt they would release a Scandium model if they had any reservations about its durability. I am personally pretty excited about it.
 

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No, all I have seen so far is a couple of lines of text in the January Guns & Ammo magazine in their "New for 2004" section. I would keep checking www.smith-wesson.com for the announcement over the next month or two...
 

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Astrohell85,
I am hearing Blue/Black on the scandium model. As far as scandium vs. aluminum. S&W's web site says that scandium is a lot stronger. Here is what the S&W web site had to say:
]
So how does a little scandium produce this remarkable increase in strength in aluminum alloys? Regular aluminum alloys have a grain structure that can be coarse and non-uniform, not a desirable property for yield strength. Even more problematic, this structure has a tendency to weaken over time through use. Adding a tiny amount of scandium to the alloy produces several results, the most important being a new alloy with a much finer grain structure which means greater strength and a reduction or elimination of long-term fatigue effects. The scandium alloy is a material that is lighter in weight than titanium or steel but with tensile strength and fatigue resistance that make it an ideal candidate of firearms fabrication. [/QUOTE
They have used it for .357 magnums for a while. It should be a great alternitive to aluminum and the fatigue issues that other makers have.
you can go here to see the whole page on scandium:
S&W scandium info
 
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