1911Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi again, I talked to a ipsc shooter this Morning, and was basicaly told that a heavier gn bullet loaded to just mae major would give less recoil than a lighter bullet loaded to make major in a pistol not using a compensator, can anyone point me someplace where I could get a better understand of this?
Thanks
Tom
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
190 Posts
Hey TMG (too many guns?)

That IPSC shooter had it about right. The reason is that a significant portion of the recoil equation is based on the kinetic energy of the projectile and the propellant gasses. As you no doubt know, kinetic energy is calculated by taking half the product of the mass involved and the square of the velocity, so that as velocity increases as it must to maintain a constant power factor (which is closely analogous to momentum and is the product of velocity and weight) the effect is to increase kinetic energy even though momentum is constant. The increased energy is felt in recoil. Different powders will contribute to give different recoil signatures as well and can affect a shooter's ability to stay on target or make a smooth transition between targets.

Cheers,

Norm
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Originally posted by Norm Lee:
Hey TMG (too many guns?)


grin, I never thought about that, it's intials, but hey I like yours better! think I'll stick with it!

That IPSC shooter had it about right. The reason is that a significant portion of the recoil equation is based on the kinetic energy of the projectile and the propellant gasses. As you no doubt know, kinetic energy is calculated by taking half the product of the mass involved and the square of the velocity, so that as velocity increases as it must to maintain a constant power factor (which is closely analogous to momentum and is the product of velocity and weight) the effect is to increase kinetic energy even though momentum is constant. The increased energy is felt in recoil. Different powders will contribute to give different recoil signatures as well and can affect a shooter's ability to stay on target or make a smooth transition between targets.

Cheers,

Norm

Thanks Norm, I'm a little dissapointed, I picked up 500 180gn bullets, I think I'll see if I can trade them in on heavier ones, the fellow at the reloading place must have thought I'm using a compensator as most pof the folks that buy from him do

TooManyGuns I like it really!

Tom
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
217 Posts
Don't trade them in yet, you don't quite have all the facts.

Recoil is a function of bullet momentum, not kinetic energy. Momentum is mass x velocity. The greater the momentum, the greater the recoil everything else being equal.

But wait, there's more (Ginsu commercial): The recoil you feel depends on how fast it occurs - hence recoil pulse. A 180gr @1000fps and a [email protected] have identical recoil, but they feel different. Some folks like the slower recoil of heavy bullets, some like the fast recoil of light bullets. And to complicate things, the recoil pulse speed effects the cycling rate of 1911.

I personally like the snappy recoil of the 180's better than the push of the heavier bullets. But that's my preference.



------------------
Have a great day!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
550 Posts
Keep your bullets. The difference in recoil between a 230 grain bullet and a 200 grain bullet, both fired at a velocity to just make major, is .01 foot-pounds if the powder charge is the same, and .07 foot-pounds if the powder charge for the heavier bullet is .5 grains less. Nobody can detect a few hundredths of a foot-pound of recoil.

There are a number of recoil calculators on the internet. One such is at

zvis.com/bali/brecoil.shtml
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Originally posted by dla:
Don't trade them in yet, you don't quite have all the facts.

Recoil is a function of bullet momentum, not kinetic energy. Momentum is mass x velocity. The greater the momentum, the greater the recoil everything else being equal.

But wait, there's more (Ginsu commercial): The recoil you feel depends on how fast it occurs - hence recoil pulse. A 180gr @1000fps and a [email protected] have identical recoil, but they feel different. Some folks like the slower recoil of heavy bullets, some like the fast recoil of light bullets. And to complicate things, the recoil pulse speed effects the cycling rate of 1911.

I personally like the snappy recoil of the 180's better than the push of the heavier bullets. But that's my preference.


Thanks, I think I'll try some of both out, I kow I didn;t mind the 200gn lswc
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Originally posted by KLN:
Keep your bullets. The difference in recoil between a 230 grain bullet and a 200 grain bullet, both fired at a velocity to just make major, is .01 foot-pounds if the powder charge is the same, and .07 foot-pounds if the powder charge for the heavier bullet is .5 grains less. Nobody can detect a few hundredths of a foot-pound of recoil.

There are a number of recoil calculators on the internet. One such is at

zvis.com/bali/brecoil.shtml
Great I never thought about looking for a program such as this
Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
220 Posts
Originally posted by KLN:
Nobody can detect a few hundredths of a foot-pound of recoil.

Although you may not be able to tell the difference in the recoil, you CAN tell the difference in the bullets quite easily. Load a few up to the same power factor, have someone else shoot them so that you don't know which is which. Recoil difference may be minor, but muzzle flip is easily detected....... Heavier the bullet, the less the flip, as long as they are loaded to the same PF. The downside of the heavier bullets is slowed slide speed and a different feeling gun, but for youngsters and (no offense) women, the big bullets are a great way to start.

Rich
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top