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I hate seeing unsafe behavior at the indoor range I use. Here are a few glaring errors people make. I am sure that most of you don't do these things, but hopefully we can learn from each other.

Three people in one lane. I can see a husband and wife in one lane, or a father and son. But when three adults share one lane, all kinds of weird interaction occurs. People hand guns to each other, someone will be standing behind the line holding a gun, people will be loading mags (or guns) behind the line.

Our range rules are that we cannot hand a gun to someone. It must be placed down on the booth table pointed down range. The other person picks it up and must inspect to for being empty.

Double taps. I hate seeing people shoot so fast that they lose all control of their guns. One guy in the lane next to mine shot 200 rounds, all double taps. Most of his shots were hitting the gound well under the big silhouette target. His assailant would have been hit in the knee caps. He needed to learn basic trigger control before shooting double taps. The problem was, he probably thought it was a great range session.

The full auto renters don't bother me as much since they are at the line for 15seconds and leave.

Pointing guns to the side. It is just common sense not to point any gun at fellow shooters, but I see it all the time. Some people think the thin plastic booth barriers are impenetrable.

Loading behind the line. The worse example was when a table was placed behind the line. Two shooters were loading their mags at this back table with their back to the booths and targets, with their guns laid on this back table (pointed to the side, at me). I told them that all guns must be pointed downrange. But instead of moving to their booths where they should have been, they stayed at the back table and pivoted their guns downrange so the muzzles were then pointing at their own chests! I had to report them to the range master for that one and he gave them a good talking too.

One thing I learned is that because of cockiness, shooters don't want to be lectured to by other shooters. Do yourself a favor and report unsafe practices to your range master.
 

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While it has been some time since I`ve been to a range, my CCW training course/range trip a year ago reminded me why I`m so thankful that I have plenty of places to shoot on private land. Just my family members and a few very close trustworthy friends join me.
 

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This may sound crazy...

but here in Canada, I work part time as a range monkey chaperoning (unlicensed) shooters as they blat off a few rounds. They seem to be safer than the bunch you described.
 

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I hate organized ranges with their cease fire while the long range shooters slowly walk to the targets. I hate not being able to draw from concealed carry. I hate the range monkeys telling me what to do, I've already known since before they were born. And for all this, they charge you money to be there! Thank God I'm in a place where we can still find open range to practice!
 

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I work part time at an indoor range/gun shop and know exactly what you're talking about. We tell people the rules, but some just won't listen.

The worst thing has happened a couple times. A customer will come in and rent a gun, and then use it on themselves. Not a pretty picture. It hasn't happened on my watch, but it's always in the back of my mind.
 

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Its everyones responsibility to promote safety. One factor to take in is the huge ego/inferiority complex a new shooter gets. Hes at the range where everyone seems to know eachother, hes a man so he wont ask for directions or help and hes seen too much TV so shooting must be an inherent male trait!!!!! Then he cant hit a target and now hes really feeling self conscious.
I shoot at a private 24 hour range. All good people alot of NYC LEO's who in my opinion are the unsafest and thick headed group in my area. They qualify once a year and dont even get range ammo. Yet they usually know everything. The young guys are usually alot more open minded and open for some constructive criticism. I always start with a compliment even if theyre shooting a POS Ill say nice whatever. Then I ask how do you like that ? Then I ease in with a couple of friendly suggestions. Usually that works. If an unsafe male is showing his woman how to shoot I dont even bother I will wait until they leave. Its the testosterone effect.
Its like arguing with the wife you can be 1000% right but its the way you say it
Shoot well Stay Safe
John
 

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One thing I learned is that because of cockiness, shooters don't want to be lectured to by other shooters. Do yourself a favor and report unsafe practices to your range master.

+1 for not saying anything to the shooters who don't know any better regarding unsafe practices. I look at this situation as having the same potential as a possible "road rage" situation. If, with all the best intentions, you try and correct someone, they may just react negatively and things could escalate from there.

I also believe that reporting the unsafe situation to the range master is the best bet. :)
 

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+1 for not saying anything to the shooters who don't know any better regarding unsafe practices. I look at this situation as having the same potential as a possible "road rage" situation. If, with all the best intentions, you try and correct someone, they may just react negatively and things could escalate from there.

I also believe that reporting the unsafe situation to the range master is the best bet. :)
It is your responsibility to help promote safe gun handling. It is the duty of the RSO. If you let it go on....well it only takes once.

I manage a range (30 shooters tonight) and have never had anyone respond in a negative manner to correcting negligent gun handling. Some have become regular shooters and good friends. If they give you flak (never happened yet) they get dismissed. Often as not, it is with a family w/kids and the situation means taking dad aside, offer corrections, watch him implement them, thus making him a hero to his kids and under the watchful eyes of mom, who will likely decide how much, if any shooting they do... if you intervene, you have already put a stop to it... next is keeping them interested instead of offended. It takes some social skills, discretion and concern for their dignity, once safety has been addressed. That's your responsibility as a shooter. It is the Range Safety Officer's DUTY!
 

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Never been to an indoor or outdoor range. yeah, I thank God too for my good old country shooting range behind the shop and in the shop.. Ren
 

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I'm supprised at a particulars posters attitude, but I won't call his name out.
I respect the rules of every range I'm at, nomatter how inconvienient they may be. And I'm thankfull for the local ranges I have nearby. Yes some shooters are idiots, but at least they are at a range where they can have at least some rules and common sense reign their stupidity in instead of having them shoot up a public wilderness erea like common vandles.

There are so many forces trying to shut down ranges, I don't care how inconvienient it may be to obey certian club rules, I am still glad to have them.
 

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One thing I learned is that because of cockiness, shooters don't want to be lectured to by other shooters. Do yourself a favor and report unsafe practices to your range master.
I'm really wondering what type of range you shoot at. Every one of the transgressions you mention should (and most will say MUST) be handled by the range officer. Where was he?!

I have worked as range officer at the club I belong to. As such my opinion of the skill level of most shooters at a public range day has gone WAY down. The one thing I do when I am not range officer is to get after the range officer (and I mean GET AFTER) if there are any problems with safety (they used to call it Duck on a June bug :biglaugh:).

It's amazing how many people respond well to that approach. They are told what they are doing wrong without being personally confronted (the range officer takes the heat). I have seen multiple times where the entire range calms down and people start paying strict attention to the safety aspects (the way it should be).

By the way. I'm a little tiny milk-toast type of guy (six feet tall, 48" chest and 36" around the middle. Bench press 390 at 25 reps.
 

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I guess I've been pretty luck, but I haven't seen too many unsafe people at the indoor range I frequent. I see quite a bit of poor technique, but most everyone has the basic rules down pat. Of course I shoot on week day afternoons and avoid the place like the plague on weekends.
 

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My suggestion to the range owners is simple...get rid of the wannabee Range Nazis and simply enforce the rules. If I want to pick up my brass, as long it's not in front of the firing line, let me. Limit the down time between the long range shooters and the 25 or less guys. Give me a lane where I can draw from my holster, it's only realistic! No wonder where I live most guys go shoot in the desert!
 

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My suggestion to the range owners is simple...get rid of the wannabee Range Nazis and simply enforce the rules. If I want to pick up my brass, as long it's not in front of the firing line, let me. Limit the down time between the long range shooters and the 25 or less guys. Give me a lane where I can draw from my holster, it's only realistic! No wonder where I live most guys go shoot in the desert!

Isn't that the truth???

I lived in Mesa for almost 5 years and shot in the desert many a weekend.

It was also amazing to see the stuff that people dragged out there to use as targets.....

:eek:
 

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The problem is the range isn't there just so you can practice drawing from you're holster.....
Most ranges are set up just as they are called...shooting ranges, not tactical training centers.
Most of their buisness is hunters setting up for deer season, sock drawer gun owners making sure they can manage to pull a trigger, and benchrest/bullseye leagues.
You have to accept the fact that other people use the range for other purposes than your particular one.
I accepted this fact long ago about my local ranges when the local authorities started fining people shooting in the "public" wilderness ereas forcing me to go back to using the local range. I enjoy the ranges more now than I used to by just excersizing a little patience and respect for the other shooters and the ownerships rules wich are only there for everyones safety.
 

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I understand the deer hunters wanting to sight in their rifles, but what is that, once a year? What about the regular shooters who want a realistic place to shoot? Give the long-range shooters a place to go...how many lanes do they need? Give the shotgunners ranges too, they're a fun bunch of guys. To hold the rest of us back just causes discontent...and I've dropped my expensive membership dues because of if. If the current ranges don't accept that, they won't be in business long.
 

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I regularly go to a public range where I do the public range stuff and follow the rules established for that range.

I also belong to a private shooting club (indoor & outdoor ranges) that allows for a bit more varieity, variation and the "tactical" stuff when I want to go that way.

I have no problem taking to folks at either place in terms of safe gun handling although I will usually go to the owner at the public range and let him handle things as he is the one in change overall as well as the one paying the insurance bills on his range.

Safety concerns me a lot these days as I have come close to being gut shot by a fool with a malfunctioning gun and as some here remember from an earlier post, this happened:



Unbeknownst to me the doof in the lane to my right decided to load his 9mm at the back bench instead of on the line. He then chambered a round and proceeded to turn back toward the firing line with his finger on the trigger. I heard a bang and felt a tug on my very baggy shirt sleeve, which was followed by a load exclamation of surprise :eek: from the shooter. Yep....nice 9mm hole through the cuff. :mummy: We had a very serious talk. Civil, but very serious.

I tend to keep a close eye on folks around me these days and don't mind speaking up about something if need be. :rock:
 

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Thank God you're o.k., the idiot factor is very scary.
I'll admit, when I took my Concealed Carry class, some of the people there at the range scared the you know what out of me, I thought "these people shouldn't own a pair of scissors, drive a car, or reproduce let alone own and handle a gun"!

I've had people next to me at the range point their gun right at me, hand me their gun, tell me "it's o.k., it's unloaded", I rack the slide and out pops a live round...etc, etc,...the list goes on forever, my best buddy who just got back into shooting asked me why there were so many holes in the ceiling.....I told him one word......idiots.
 

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When I shoot, I like to go on weekdays in the mornings, and very often I am the only shooter on the range (indoor). Safety issues are the very reason that I go when I do. When I shoot for work, we have the range to ourselves and I know and trust the people around me. Not so with public ranges on off-duty time. Unfortunately you can't comfortably enjoy your shooting session while trying to watch all the people around you.
 
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