1911Forum banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone tried the surplus 40's-50's mfgr US 45acp? It come in sealed 756 rounds in a sardine type can. It is corrosive, but I always clean my guns after shooting. Is there any reason I should aviod this stuff? I'm shooting a Sistema 1911 and just looking for cheap blastin ammo.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,203 Posts
IIRC, there has been sevearal discussions about this ammo in the past. I would not think there would be any problem shooting it, just remember most modern solvents will not touch corrosive salts used. Good hot, soapy water will take care of them, tho....

------------------
American by Birth, Gunowner by Choice
Molon Labe
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Jim, Thanks for the tip about soapy water. I was assuming regular cleaning solvents would have worked. Glad I asked!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
the old GI bore cleaner will also clean out the corrosive salts.you can find the stuff in most mail order places and gun shows,pretty cheap also.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
What about brass salvage? Can this ammo be reloaded without any special preparations (soaking in goat urine for 3 weeks)or something as difficult, due to the corrosive nature of its priming?

Ed
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,203 Posts
Well, I have some 1917 dated boxes of .45 ACP, when they were really corrosive and the label says to drop the cases in a container of soapy water to clean them. I would think that that would be the most one would have to do. My 'smith has reloaded a lot of WWII era .45 brass without any special cleaning.

FWIW YMMV NWEI VWP NVIAS LS/MFT

------------------
Ne Conjuge Nobiscum
MOLON LABE
Leonidas c 480 BC
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
709 Posts
You bet! thats stuff "Works" I put it though my Colt S/S all day long. Its reloadable too!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,005 Posts
Parading my ignorance once more: why did they load the GI ammo so corrosively? Did they think the officers in question had a lot of time on their hands, and they wanted to keep them busy trying to save their barrels?

(Jim V, I got some of your acronyms - and I may be one of the few correspondents old enough to recognize "LS/MFT" - but some of the others have me stumped. Do you translate?)


------------------
If God didn't want us to own guns, why did He make the 1911?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
157 Posts
The priming compound that predates non-corrosive chemistry was used for a number of reasons: It was stable, didn't change its properties over large temperature shifts, it remained active during long storage, and it was efficient.

The first non-corrosive priming compounds were not as efficient, and were first used in Berdan primers because the primer cup had more volume than Boxer primers.

The military didn't switch to non-corrosive in the 1930's because they were still not sure it would store as well. (They still had warehouses full of 1917 and 1918 production ammo. They expected ammo to last 20-30-40 years in storage, so why be hasty in new primers?)

The M-1 Carbine was designed and its ammo spec'd in 1941, so they insisted on non-corrosive ammo.

Now we have the opposite problem. the ammo is non-corrosive, but the Marine Corps is still cleaning "on three succesive days after firing" and wearing out rifles and barrels form cleaning. At least they practice, which is more than you can say for the Army.

[This message has been edited by Patrick Sweeney (edited 07-25-2001).]
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top