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as i was reading the thread on ambi safeties it got me thinking about strong side safeties, on my springer loaded champion, it has a large ambi safety, honestly i would like to replace it with a smaller single side safety, but as it is i find myself usually resting my thumb on the strong side (left side for right handed shooters like myself) safety when shooting, my question is whether this is common or do most people bring their thumb down below the safety onto the grip when shooting? hope this makes sense, if its not clear let me know and ill try to clarify more.
 

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The common held view is that riding your thumb on the safety means more control of the gun and less muzzle flip.

You can do it with a narrow or a wider safety. Of course, the more thumb you can get on the safety the greater the effects listed above.
 

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I have tried that method of resting my thumb on the safety and it seems a little uncomfortable for me. At this time I wrap my thumb arround the grip below the safety.
 

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safety

I rest my thumb on the safety, it does two things one like notes above it helps control the gun and two it prevents any chance of kicking safety on accidentally.
 

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I ride the safety also. Just feels right for me.
 

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It is the proper way to grip a 1911 if your gun and hand will support it. Certain grip safety without the palm pad like the old GI or factory Colt units won't engage properly when gripped in this manner. Most if not all modern beavertail grip safety with the bumper pad will let you do this just fine.
 

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re: "It is the proper way to shoot a 1911"

I have never heard that before, in 4 decades of shooting 1911s.

Perhaps I've missed out on something. My training emphasized the grip on the frame below the trigger guard, as being what controls the 1911. My thumb rests lightly below the thumb safety on the upper grip panel.
 

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re: "It is the proper way to shoot a 1911"

I have never heard that before, in 4 decades of shooting 1911s.

Perhaps I've missed out on something..
I would say more than perhaps....lol

I don't know anyone in competition who shoots at a high level who doesn't grip a 1911 style (including fat guns) this way.
 

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...."high level" certainly leaves me out....

My trainer was NRA certified pistol competition high-end guy...he also was an antique from WW2 & Korea. He made a point over many sessions about the grip. I've never considered it a handicap, but certainly will look into the question. Thanks for the idea.
 

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This.....



LOG
 

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Thanks for the tips. I've reviewed the Cooper link & photos.

Now for a little unconditioning.....

Excuse me while I go out to the range today. Looks like all those reloads are going to come in handy.....
 

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Before you go..... the left hand is rotated fully and the thumbs don't really squeeze the frame so much as they are just there.

LOG
 

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yes....no squeeze as such....

here's from the AMTU manual:

"g. The force of recoil must be controlled by being transmitted straight to the rear into the
shooting arm. Recoil against the base of the thumb, which causes the weapon to twist in the
hand, will allow a shift or grip and/or a bending of the wrist. Either event jeopardizes quick
recovery from recoil in timed and rapid fire. The pistol should be held by being gripped
normally, not by a choking grasp that endeavors to press on the stock in an all enveloping
grab. The best points of pressure to hold the sight in alignment are the semi-flat grips on
each side of the frame. However, the gripping hand cannot exert equal pressure on each of
these surfaces simultaneously and such pressure would not overcome the effect of recoil.
Therefore, the obvious pressure points of the shooting hand that will channel the effect of
recoil straight to the rear and allow relative ease in maintaining sight alignment are: the
middle bones of the three lower fingers, the base of the thumb high on the stock, the
depression on the center of the heel of the hand, and last, the base joints of the four fingers
along the upper palm. The primary pressure points on the .45 caliber pistol are the front
surface of the grip and the mainspring housing-grip safety surfaces. The secondary points
are: high on the left side of the stock near the slide lock and the forward curve of the right
grip, each of which have to have gripping pressure applied equally to prevent loosening of the
over all grip, and to maintain sight alignment."

and so forth....

so what to make of it? I'm going to give each a try and see what the targets tell me.
 

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The high thumbs grip really comes into it's own when shooting quickly. If one is firing one shot at a time at the range, I don't think it really matters.

But when you are trying to shoot fast on multiple targets, gripping the gun with high thumbs really makes a difference.
 

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It is the proper way to grip a 1911 if your gun and hand will support it. Certain grip safety without the palm pad like the old GI or factory Colt units won't engage properly when gripped in this manner. Most if not all modern beavertail grip safety with the bumper pad will let you do this just fine.
"if your gun and hand will support it" is the key phrase here. I find that resting my thumb on the safety is by far the most natural and controlable way to hold my 1911. The problem is I can't do it. :bawling: I have a Caspian with a Wilson Combat beavertail WITH the pad. Even with this setup I have had at least two or three occassions per 100 rounds where I fail to engage the grip saftey because of resting my thumb on the safety.

The only way I'm going to be able to hold my 1911 in my prefered fashion is by disabling the grip safety (which I hate anyways)...innertube or duct tape here I come. :biglaugh:
 
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