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Much to his credit.

In Brazil, President Bolsonaro takes a different business-as-usual path, saying simply: "People are going to die, I'm sorry," he said. "But we can't stop a car factory because there are traffic accidents."

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-latin-america-52080830

I suppose that President Bolsonaro choose not to attend any school of political correctness.:rolleyes:
And every time our guy tries to go this way. All of the media clowns jump all over him. These people are quickly sqawking their way into irrelevance. Nobody is going to be handing out awards for the most indignant declaration. :barf:
 

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Being kinda a disease expert....... trying not to be pessimistic here.... but.... since it’s airborne. Quarantine will slow it. Not stop it. Since everyone sick at once is a disaster- slowing is good. But here in the south, it’s about 1/3 business as usual- 2/3 in hiding.
Realistically? The infection rate will eventually be about 1% tested or not. 80% will never know it, or assume they have a touch of allergy’s.... 15% are in for the worst flu/asthma/bone pain they ever had. 5% are dead. The bad news? The US has 300m people. That’s 3,000,000 infected. That’s a good 150,000 dead. Not all at once. Not all this year. The good news? Coronavirus there’s several versions we have been exposed to all along. When you get a cold you develop immunity for a few years. Most immunities are lifelong. But not Corona. So, if you get a cold- you won’t get THAT cold again for a few years. At any given time the average person has 1,2,3, or even 4 corona immunities in them from various mild or unknown exposures. What this means is CoVid 19 will be here to stay. It will slowly blend in with the other Coronaviruses and the 80% that never knew they had it- will have some immunity for a while.
So it’s effects will be less and less each season.
Coronaviruses are not fans of UV/sunlight so the hot summers will slow it down. Your best bet to be one of the 80% that didn’t even know they had it is simple: large viral load exposure makes you get sicker faster/harder/worse. So. Washing hands, handles, door knobs, soles of shoes, gas pumps, really will help reduce viral load even if exposed. I would also recommend the whole 6’ apart social distancing thing. And no large groups. Think of how American Indians died of colds when Europeans came over. But that no longer happens. We will adjust and it will become less important as time goes by. Also, by comparison? Smallpox and other pandemics had 30% kill rates. We are fortunate this maintains around 4-5% and 10% in elderly or diseased . This IS NOT A MILITARY OR MAN MADE VIRUS. Most of those have a phenomenal 90-97% kill rates. Since this is a 1911 forum I’ll throw this in......and I work with CoVid 19 in the facility three days a week....I am less afraid of the ‘problem’ than I am the ‘public’ people make bad decisions when scared. Stay safe . Stay cocked, locked, ready to Rock.
Many good points.

In fact, I think the pivotal issue you just raised is the "Viral Load" issue not mentioned until now in the whole forum for the past month. The dose of viral particulates one is exposed to in a short period instance, 'quantity wise' could be a key issue as to whether someone is overcome with illness or is able to shrug it off.

Good work.

I was also researching this topic... in epidemiology, I believe the term they use is "Biological Gradient", nevertheless, viral load at exposure is what makes sense as to why some healthy people with good immune system get deadly ill and some die, and others barely get any symptoms, some with minor cold symptoms and some remain asymptomatic.

The experts still don't have the answers because they like experiments, but I think the evidence is empirical.

If this were radiation poisoning, a single large exposure, can cause someone to become so sick they die in days... whereas, if someone is exposed to a much smaller dose of radiation, they may show no symptom... maybe cancer in 10 years, but their bodies are able to repair themselves in the short time period.

Likewise if someone is exposed to an overwhelming dose of this virus, such as inhaling millions from a infectiously sick patient (I have no idea what dose would be lethal, just guessing a number) of viral particulate bodies, that person's immune system is overcome, and they cannot produce enough antibodies to attack the foreign and novel bug. The bug is then free to destroy as much healthy tissue as possible.

On the other hand, someone who is exposed to a much smaller dose... say a few hundred viral cells, the healthy immune systems is able to begin to recognize a new foreign bug, and develop antibodies for it. It could be a race between viral cells and antibodies fighting each other.

Symptoms like fever, sore throats, coughs are generally signs that the body is in a biological war against a pathogens.

So it could be possible that people exposed to minor dosages are receiving the equivalent of a natural vaccine... just enough to let the immune system learn how to make an antibody and prepare its defense.

Glad you mentioned the viral load exposure thing!!!
 

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Just an amusing observation:

With most of the regular reporters not getting all their makeup/hair quaffed as usual, and lighting in front of the cameras.

Has anyone else noticed that many of these reporters (especially the females) look very ,,,,different...:) :eek: I’ll leave it there...:biglaugh:
 

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Hong Kong Flue/1968 Flue P endemic - we have been here before

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hong_Kong_flu#Virology

The same virus returned the following years: a year later, in late 1969 and early 1970, and in 1972. The CDC currently estimates that, in total, the virus killed 1 million people worldwide and around 100,000 people in the U.S.[8]
 

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1957 Flu Pandemic

Another one...

I'm posting these last two because we talked a lot about the mega-flue of 1918 (675,000 US deaths), and the relatively speaking milder swine flue (13,000 US Deaths) of 10 years ago, but didn't cover the 1957 and 1968 flues - these two which in severity fall in-between the 1918 and swine flues...Just some additional perspective....We will survive this one today also with aplomb.

So far CV9 has the US at a relatively low 3,146 deaths
. Lets keep praying it stays relatively low.

https://www.cdc.gov/publications/panflu/stories/1957.html
The 1957 flu pandemic was deadly, but milder than the 1918 event. The virus caused an estimated 70,000 deaths in the United States. The stories presented in this section are retold by survivors from New York to California.
 

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Another one...

I'm posting these last two because we talked a lot about the mega-flue of 1918 (675,000 US deaths), and the relatively speaking milder swine flue (13,000 US Deaths) of 10 years ago, but didn't cover the 1957 and 1968 flues - these two which in severity fall in-between the 1918 and swine flues...Just some additional perspective....We will survive this one today also with aplomb.

So far CV9 has the US at a relatively low 3,146 deaths
. Lets keep praying it stays relatively low.

https://www.cdc.gov/publications/panflu/stories/1957.html
The 1957 flu pandemic was deadly, but milder than the 1918 event. The virus caused an estimated 70,000 deaths in the United States. The stories presented in this section are retold by survivors from New York to California.
I've always wondered whether the 1918 influenza played a larger role in concluded WWI than is commonly discussed by historians. One reads of reports that soldiers on both the French and German sides were becoming less willing to follow commands to engage in battle, sensing little purpose in adding to the casualties of both combat and influenza. Due to passage of time, the answer may never be known and the history written by the Allied Powers will remain accepted as definitive.

I do not pretend to know answers to this question, but I'll admit to having some curiousity..
 

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I'm a Ruger man.
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Never really drank a lot of foreign beers. I am glad to be a Pabst Blue Ribbon Guy. I have no worries here in Alabama.



Harry!
Drop by some time and I'll introduce you to Shiner Bock.
 
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