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I'm pretty sure that all the military frames had serial numbers.

If the gun was shipped with a serial number before 1968 removing that serial number is a violation of Federal Law.

Some guns didn't have serial numbers. Remington 22 rifles come to mind.
 

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I'm pretty sure that all the military frames had serial numbers.

If the gun was shipped with a serial number before 1968 removing that serial number is a violation of Federal Law.
It did and you are correct, but we have at least one member that will say that it was made before 1968 and it doesn't matter if someone removed the original serial number.

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Something about the frame trigger cutouts aren’t correct. I’m wondering if this wasn’t a modified M1911 frame. Here’s a correct pic of how they should look.
611852
 

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Could it be? Maybe a modified North American frame? Look where they were made. Could that explain the R?


1945
North American Arms (M1911): (Return to top)
The North American Arms Co. Ltd., Quebec City, Quebec, Canada was awarded a contract on July 1 1918, to manufacture M1911 pistols at the rate of 2000 pistols per day, at a cost of $15.50 each.
NAA (North American Arms) leased the old Ross Rifle Plant in Quebec City for the manufacture of the pistol. Few details are known about the operation, and no pistols were delivered. The Company however did reach the pre-production stage of manufacturing, and approximately 100 toolroom/pre-production pistols were made. Pistol serial 46 was submitted to the Claims Board for inspection in the Spring of 1920. The claims board was set up to examine and settle any claims arising out of canceled contracts and the like. The board members included Colonel Gilbert H. Stewart, later Commanding Officer of Springfield Armory.
NAA pistols had all of the normal characteristics of the Colts made M1911s, but had different markings. The left slide legend had the manufacturers name and address. The serial number was marked on the slide just above the thumb safety, on the Left side of the trigger( sometimes inside the receiver), and on the receiver under the left grip. No inspection or acceptance marks. These pistols are of course quite rare and are seldom sold in original condition. Therefore establishing a value is mostly guess work. Reference Charles Clawsons “Colt .45 Service pistols”. Note: This is a very pricey gun when found in original condition, prices ranging from $10,000 to well over $20,000 have been reported. But be careful as it is one of the most copied/forged M1911s.
 

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Something about the frame trigger cutouts aren’t correct. I’m wondering if this wasn’t a modified M1911 frame. Here’s a correct pic of how they should look. View attachment 611852
The frame was narrowed while removing the markings, so the cutouts would be a slightly different shape.
 

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The finger relief cuts are not unusual for a USGI frame. Definitely not a Singer or US&S, since those had pretty distinctive profiles, but possibly a Remington Rand or Ithaca.
 

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That’s a Remington frame above it. I see a distinctive difference. However I am no expert. I do find this a intriguing thread though.
 

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That’s a Remington frame above it. I see a distinctive difference. However I am no expert. I do find this a intriguing thread though.
Definitely not a Colt frame. The finger reliefs look wonky because of the way the markings were removed, almost at an angle being that the inspector stamp is gone but the P proof is still intact

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That’s a Remington frame above it. I see a distinctive difference. However I am no expert. I do find this a intriguing thread though.
This was long before CNC machining, and there was a lot of variances in the outside cosmetics of the frame and other components. It was all subtle, but it was there. Colt was no different, but I can tell this isn't a Colt frame because the frame "ears" at the back are too short. Colt's were longer than those of the other contractors.
 

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The slide has Remington Rand stamped on the left. A "P" near the rear sight. And absolutely nothing on the right side.
The frame has the a "P" by the slide release on the left side but missing the FJA under the slide stop. Then on the right, where I think the serial number should be it has this mark "R S 1100" or maybe it's "R S 110 0" you can see in the pic.
An old WWII vet gave me the gun some 30 years ago. Never gave it a thought. Pulled it out today, June 6th, and thought how cool I have this history. Thought maybe I could get more info from the serial number but looking through databases of 1911's on the net there is nothing close to " R S ANYTHING" that I could find.
Is that a real serial number ? Any thoughts on where I might look next ?
If you go to the internet and enter 1911 Pistol Proof marks you will many of the Proof markings. RS may the initials for the person accepting the firearm. I have Remmington Rand 1911A1 with FJA which is Frank J. Atwood. The "P" is also listed in the proof marking. The 1100 numbers may be a rack number.
 

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Thank you BBBBill. Interesting thought on Replacement Serial. Going to wait a few days for more responses then if still in doubt contact ATF to see if they have that serial number in their books. And if it's got to go, I'll keep everything but the frame.
Replacement serial number . That is not an authorized method . You can have a another serial number proofed but must be recorded with proper documentation. RS was used by Robert Sears who accpted 1911A1 from Colt during the war years. Very Similar to FJA accepted 1911A1 from Remmington Rand & ithaca
 

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The pistol was a gift. For thirty years you've thought the pistol was legitimate. The frame is of indeterminate origin but is serial numbered. Calling the BATF doesn't determine provenance.
Replace the busted and missing grip screw bushings, the mag catch lock, maybe new springs (GI), clean, lubricate the pistol. Shoot it, enjoy it and set it aside for your son.
 

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The slide has Remington Rand stamped on the left. A "P" near the rear sight. And absolutely nothing on the right side.
The frame has the a "P" by the slide release on the left side but missing the FJA under the slide stop. Then on the right, where I think the serial number should be it has this mark "R S 1100" or maybe it's "R S 110 0" you can see in the pic.
An old WWII vet gave me the gun some 30 years ago. Never gave it a thought. Pulled it out today, June 6th, and thought how cool I have this history. Thought maybe I could get more info from the serial number but looking through databases of 1911's on the net there is nothing close to " R S ANYTHING" that I could find.
Is that a real serial number ? Any thoughts on where I might look next ?
I suspect it was a "Lunch Box Gun". If the frame is devoid of any proof marks or identifying roll marks, it was probably a frame that was stolen from the manufacturing facility. It happened more than you would think during the war.
 

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Replacement serial number . That is not an authorized method . You can have a another serial number proofed but must be recorded with proper documentation. RS was used by Robert Sears who accpted 1911A1 from Colt during the war years. Very Similar to FJA accepted 1911A1 from Remmington Rand & ithaca
Its extremely crude to be a replacement frame or anything else official.
 

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I suspect it was a "Lunch Box Gun". If the frame is devoid of any proof marks or identifying roll marks, it was probably a frame that was stolen from the manufacturing facility. It happened more than you would think during the war.
Lunch box gun .... it has the P proof next to the mag catch

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The P proofs were added during final inspection on all but Colt pistols, so it's doubtful that it's a lunchbox frame. Personally I hold a dim view of the entire "lunchbox gun" concept, considering the amount of wartime security in place at the time. If every gun like this that we see online and at gun shows was a lunchbox gun then 2/3 of the guns made somehow snuck out of the plants!
 

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Thank you tgt_USA. Attached more pics. Looking through threads it appears that without a serial number, this pistol would be illegal and I'm to dispose of it, perhaps give it to ATF. I want nothing to do with an illegal anything so if that's what I have to do I will but the "R S 100 0" on the right is clearly stamped. Always thought that was the serial number until I started looking for it on the net and realized it's not even close. Then again, that doesn't mean it's not a real serial number just different for some reason. I hope someone knows what it is, if it's legal, or can guide me further. I've no intention of selling it. My son joined the Army last week (shipped Memorial Day) and I'd hope he'd inherit this piece of history.
View attachment 611730 View attachment 611731 View attachment 611732 View attachment 611733 View attachment 611734 View attachment 611735 View attachment 611736
I live in Michigan where we have handgun registration. When a pistol has no serial number on it and you go to register it the State Police stamp a number on it and register it. This pistol probably got “happy feet” at the factory. The stamps they use look just like this. I have a Inglis HiPower marked EX 17, but it ain’t no experimental.
 

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The slide has Remington Rand stamped on the left. A "P" near the rear sight. And absolutely nothing on the right side.
The frame has the a "P" by the slide release on the left side but missing the FJA under the slide stop. Then on the right, where I think the serial number should be it has this mark "R S 1100" or maybe it's "R S 110 0" you can see in the pic.
An old WWII vet gave me the gun some 30 years ago. Never gave it a thought. Pulled it out today, June 6th, and thought how cool I have this history. Thought maybe I could get more info from the serial number but looking through databases of 1911's on the net there is nothing close to " R S ANYTHING" that I could find.
Is that a real serial number ? Any thoughts on where I might look next ?
Maybe I'm missing something, but I don't see anything suggesting that this is a Remington frame. Or that this is anything but a mixmaster parts gun.

That RS 1100 might be the serial number -- if you want a serial number you can certainly call that the serial number.

I'm sure you realize that guns were not required to have serial numbers until a little more than 50 years ago.
In the post-WWII era there were tons of 1911 parts available and tons of frames available to build those parts into guns. Larger companies marked their frames with the company name and a serial number but not all frames were marked or serialized. Some companies sold guns assembled from parts and frames. Other companies sold just frames and/or parts kits.
 
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