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Unfortunately that will impact the value of the pistol as the stamping was done after the pistol left military arsenal.
 

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It could have been done at a smaller arsenal. Never underestimate a bored armorer with a hammer and letter stamp set.
 

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It could have been done at a smaller arsenal. Never underestimate a bored armorer with a hammer and letter stamp set.
:mummy: Never thought about that before. But it could be like you said, just hard to find out decades later unless there were enough samples out there.
 

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By the looks of the front sight the slide has lost all military collector value anyway, I have seen drivers licenses stamped like that or electro penciled onto beautiful firearms effectively destroying their value. A friend was given a very rare Grizzly Magnum once made in Dallas Texas ( like the old ruger square triggerguard magnum but no screws through the frame for hammer trigger etc.) took the grips off only to find a Texas drivers license carved into the frame. At least this one was under the grip panel.
 

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I remember an article or chapter in a book on the armorers at bases that would work on 1911s for their pistol teams. They fit NM barrels and did other mods. Basically, they built their team's guns.
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Someone try to stamp post war national match slide marking NM7791435 on a WWII Ithaca slide.

mlin,
Can you provide more info on the gun in your picture? The slide has serrations like a 70s NMGC. But clearly it is not that.
 

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I remember an article or chapter in a book on the armorers at bases that would work on 1911s for their pistol teams. They fit NM barrels and did other mods. Basically, they built their team's guns.
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AMU; 'Army Marksmanship Units'. There was a great gunsmith in my home area for many years who had been one of those armorers - Reuben Boatwright.
 

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mlin,
Can you provide more info on the gun in your picture? The slide has serrations like a 70s NMGC. But clearly it is not that.
USGI national match pistol built by Springfield military arsenal in 1960s. That particular slide was made by Colt under military contract. Frame is a WWII Ithaca. The picture is to make reference to OP's question about the slide marking.
 

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So, since some great knowledge is here: would one of those AMUs have used an Essex frame back in the days when frames were scarce?

What is the significance of the NM7791414 marking vs other numbers?

Attached is a couple pix of a friend's gun that has some trademarks of a military build match gun, and he has secondhand (or further removed) information that it was a match gun from the military.
 

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Anything is possible BUT it is extremely unlikely that the military would use a frame of unknown quality to build a match gun. The more likely story is the pistol is the work of a civilian gunsmith using surplus military parts on a Essex frame.
 

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NM7791414 (barrel), NM7267718 (bushing), and NM7791435 (slide) are parts number designated in post-war periods to standardize small parts inventory. During post-war periods, there were many more contractors making replacement 1911 parts for Uncle Sam, comparing to just a few during WWII. NM prefix represent match grade slide/barrel require gunsmith fitting.

There were also standard post-war USGI contract barrel (7791193) and slide (7790314) without NM designation. Those supposed to be interchangeable with WWII parts without fitting.
 

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Anything is possible BUT it is extremely unlikely that the military would use a frame of unknown quality to build a match gun. The more likely story is the pistol is the work of a civilian gunsmith using surplus military parts on a Essex frame.
Agree with this. Without provenance/ documentation to link to AMU, it's unlikely to be recognized as legit military built competition pistol. Other possibility is that an AMU smith built pistols on his own time with new frames and surplus parts and over time people get second hand information referring as USGI competition pistols?

Back then, it was cheap to buy DCM released surplus 1911(A1) pistols and lots of civilian gunsmith use those surplus pistols to build for competition shooting too.
 
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